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Balaam, Madeline
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Talhouk, R., Montague, K., Garbett, A., Araujo-Soares, V., Akik, C., Ghattas, H., . . . Balaam, M. (2019). A Call For Embedding Dignity In Humanitarian Technologies. In: Cech, F Tellioglu, H (Ed.), 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMMUNITIES & TECHNOLOGIES (C&T): . Paper presented at 9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies (C&T), Vienna Univ Technol, Vienna, AUSTRIA, JUN 03-07, 2019 (pp. 1-4). ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Call For Embedding Dignity In Humanitarian Technologies
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2019 (English)In: 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMMUNITIES & TECHNOLOGIES (C&T) / [ed] Cech, F Tellioglu, H, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019, p. 1-4Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increasingly, technologies are being designed to support refugees. While HCI research has explored several aspects of refugee experiences, the importance of embedding the principle of dignity within technological designs is yet to be explored. In this paper we focus on the theme of dignity that was a prominent theme across three research projects we conducted with Syrian refugee communities in Lebanon. We show that the experiences of refugee participants are characterised by a loss of dignity, as well as by attempts to maintain dignity that may be mediated by technology. By highlighting the value given to dignity by our participants we emphasise the need for designers and HCI researchers to consider how technologies may create a space in which dignity is maintained and dignified interaction may take place.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY, 2019
Keywords
Refugees, Dignity, Digital Humanitarianism, Design Research
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259479 (URN)10.1145/3328320.3328373 (DOI)000482174900001 ()2-s2.0-85067846252 (Scopus ID)
Conference
9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies (C&T), Vienna Univ Technol, Vienna, AUSTRIA, JUN 03-07, 2019
Note

QC 20190917

Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Almeida, T., Chen, K.-L., Comber, R. & Balaam, M. (2019). Dismantling Feminist Biology through the Design of eTextiles. In: Research through Design 2019: . Paper presented at Research through Design 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dismantling Feminist Biology through the Design of eTextiles
2019 (English)In: Research through Design 2019, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-241914 (URN)
Conference
Research through Design 2019
Note

QC 20190128

Available from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Balaam, M., Comber, R., Clarke, R. E., Windlin, C., Ståhl, A., Höök, K. & Fitzpatrick, G. (2019). Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design. In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK: . Paper presented at CHI 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design
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2019 (English)In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Experience Centred Design (ECD) implores us to develop empathic relationships and understanding of participants, to actively work with our senses and emotions within the design process. However, theories of experience-centred design do little to account for emotion work undertaken by design researchers when doing this. As a consequence, how a design researcher’s emotions are experienced, navigated and used as part of an ECD process are rarely published. So, while emotion is clearly a tool that we use, we don’t share with one another how, why and when it gets used. This has a limiting effect on how we understand design processes, and opportunities for training. Here, we share some of our experiences of working with ECD. We analyse these using Hochschild’s framework of emotion work to show how and where this work occurs. We use our analysis to question current ECD practices and provoke debate.

Keywords
emotion work, experience-centred design, design research
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252787 (URN)10.1145/3290605.3300832 (DOI)000474467907059 ()2-s2.0-85067599533 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI 2019
Projects
Affective Health, Innovative Training Network under Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 722022
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15- 0046Swedish Research Council, 2017-05133
Note

QC 20190624

Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
Windlin, C., Ståhl, A., Sanches, P., Tsaknaki, V., Karpashevich, P., Balaam, M. & Höök, K. (2019). Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences. In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019: . Paper presented at RTD 2019 - Research through Design Conference 2019, the Science Centre, Delft, on 19th to 22nd March 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Soma Bits are a prototyping toolkit that facilitates Soma Design. Acting as an accessible ‘sociodigital material’ Soma Bits allow designers to pair digital technologies, with their whole body and senses, as part of an iterative soma design process.The Soma Bits addresses the difficulty we experienced in past Soma Design processes — that articulating ofsensations we want to evoke to others, and thenmaintaining these experiences in memory throughout a design process. Thus, the Soma Bits enable designers to know and experience what a designmight ‘feel like’ and to share that with others.

The Soma Bits relate to three experiential qualities:‘feeling connected’, ‘feeling embraced’, and ‘being in correspondence’ with the interactive materials. The Soma Bits have a form factor and materiality thatallow actuators (heat, vibration, and shape-changing) to be placed on and around the body; they are easily configurable to enable quick and controllable creations of soma experiences which can be both part of a first-person approach as well as shared withothers. The Soma Bits are a living, growing library ofshapes and actuators. We use them in our own designpractices, as well as when engaging others in soma design processes.

Keywords
Somaesthetic Interaction Design, Design Process
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253818 (URN)10.6084/m9.figshare.7855799.v2 (DOI)
Conference
RTD 2019 - Research through Design Conference 2019, the Science Centre, Delft, on 19th to 22nd March 2019.
Projects
Affective Health, Innova- tive Training Network funded by the H2020 People Programme under Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 722022
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RIT15-0046
Note

QC 20190619

Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Vasilchenko, A., Cajander, A., Daniels, M. & Balaam, M. (2019). The self-flipped classroom concept: Underlying ideas and experiences. In: Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE: . Paper presented at 48th Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2018, 3 October 2018 through 6 October 2018. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The self-flipped classroom concept: Underlying ideas and experiences
2019 (English)In: Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the modern fast changing world no formal education is able to provide learners with a complete set of knowledge, skills and competences that they would need to successfully compete on tomorrow's job market. Therefore, the role of universities is increasingly shifting towards provision of an environment where students have a chance to acquire lifelong learning skills. This paper presents underlying ideas of, and practical experiences with, an innovative pedagogy that addresses the lifelong learning skills acquisition along with additional benefits for science and technology students. The proposed approach, called self-flipped classroom (SFC), is built on a synergy of two pedagogies: learning through making and flipped classroom. To unveil the construct of the SFC, we discuss each of its components individually presenting appropriate theoretical grounding. We also report on our experiences from self-flipped classroom implementations in two countries, UK and Sweden, and in three different educational settings. From our work with the SFC concept we have identified four different roles the students can assume in a SFC scenario: creators, collaborators, communicators, and learners. We present our observations regarding the identified roles that have been found in the studied settings. We also outline some implications for teaching using the SFC concept and future research directions in this space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2019
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252029 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2018.8658616 (DOI)000468396901002 ()2-s2.0-85063514202 (Scopus ID)
Conference
48th Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2018, 3 October 2018 through 6 October 2018
Note

QC 20190625

Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Jarusriboonchai, P., Meissner, J. L., Almeida, T. & Balaam, M. (2019). Understanding Children's Free Play in Primary Schools. In: Cech, F Tellioglu, H (Ed.), 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMMUNITIES & TECHNOLOGIES (C&T): . Paper presented at 9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies (C&T), Vienna Univ Technol, Vienna, AUSTRIA, JUN 03-07, 2019 (pp. 178-188). ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding Children's Free Play in Primary Schools
2019 (English)In: 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMMUNITIES & TECHNOLOGIES (C&T) / [ed] Cech, F Tellioglu, H, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019, p. 178-188Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Various technologies (e.g., tablets, toolkits, and digital toys) are used in schools. However, they are often designed to introduce new play practices for serving pre-defined learning purposes. In this study, we are interested in constructive play 'in the wild' and how technologies can be integrated more organically into the ways young school children are already playing. This paper presents 4 one-week ethnographic study in four early primary school classrooms (children aged 5-7). The aim is to gain insights in children's free play and identify design opportunities for technology serving children's constructive play. Our findings illustrate children's interactions with resources and peers during free play, which often involve imitations and dynamically change between being solitary and social. We observed that children's constructive play was often associated with other forms of play. On this basis, we suggest three design implications for technologies that support and encourage constructive play during fee play in schools.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY, 2019
Keywords
Early childhood, play, constructive play, free play, free-time activities, design implications, design opportunities, primary school
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259474 (URN)10.1145/3328320.3328384 (DOI)000482174900024 ()2-s2.0-85067844947 (Scopus ID)
Conference
9th International Conference on Communities and Technologies (C&T), Vienna Univ Technol, Vienna, AUSTRIA, JUN 03-07, 2019
Note

QC 20190917

Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Concannon, S. J., Balaam, M., Comber, R. & Simpson, E. (2018). Applying computational analysis to textual data from the wild: A feminist perspective. In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying computational analysis to textual data from the wild: A feminist perspective
2018 (English)In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With technologies that afford much larger-scale data collection than previously imagined, new ways of processing and interpreting qualitative textual data are required. HCI researchers use a range of methods for interpreting the 'full range of human experience' from qualitative data, however, such approaches are not always scalable. Feminist geography seeks to explore how diverse and varied accounts of place can be understood and represented, whilst avoiding reductive classification systems. In this paper, we assess the extent to which unsupervised topic models can support such a research agenda. Drawing on literature from Feminist and Critical GIS, we present a case study analysis of a Volunteered Geographic Information dataset of reviews about breastfeeding in public spaces. We demonstrate that topic modelling can offer novel insights and nuanced interpretations of complex concepts such as privacy and be integrated into a critically reflexive feminist data analysis approach that captures and represents diverse experiences of place.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Critical GIS, Data analysis, Feminism, Feminist GIS, Geodata, GIS, Human-data-interaction, Text analysis, Topic modelling
National Category
Other Social Sciences Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-228563 (URN)10.1145/3173574.3173800 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046973154 (Scopus ID)9781450356206 (ISBN)9781450356213 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018
Note

QC 20180528

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Strohmayer, A., Bellini, R., Meissner, J., Alabdulqader, E., Toombs, A., Finnigan, S. M. & Balaam, M. (2018). CHIversity: Implications for equality, diversity, and inclusion campaigns. In: Proceeding CHI EA '18 Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID alt03.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CHIversity: Implications for equality, diversity, and inclusion campaigns
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2018 (English)In: Proceeding CHI EA '18 Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id alt03Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this alt.chi paper, we reflect on #CHIversity; a grassroots campaign highlighting feminist issues related to diversity and inclusion at CHI2017, and in HCI more widely. #CHIversity was operationalised through a number of activities including: collaborative cross-stitch and ‘zine’ making events; the development of a ‘Feminist CHI Programme’; and the use of a Twitter hashtag ‘#CHIversity’. These events granted insight into how diversity discourses are approached within the CHI community. From these recognitions we provide examples of how diversity and inclusion can be promoted at future SIGCHI events. These include fostering connections between attendees, discussing ‘polarizing’ research in a conservative political climate, and encouraging contributions to the growing body of HCI literature addressing feminisms and related subjects. Finally, we suggest how these approaches and benefits can translate to HCI events extending beyond CHI, where exclusion may routinely go undetected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Activism, CHIversity, Conference, Diversity, Feminism, Inclusion, Subversion
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234128 (URN)10.1145/3170427.3188396 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052021661 (Scopus ID)9781450356206 (ISBN)9781450356213 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018
Note

QC 20180903

Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Vasilchenko, A., Qarabash, H., Tarawneh, G. & Balaam, M. (2018). Collaborative content creation: Impact of media type on author behavior. In: Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW: . Paper presented at 21st ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2018, 3 November 2018 through 7 November 2018 (pp. 341-344). Association for Computing Machinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative content creation: Impact of media type on author behavior
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018, p. 341-344Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Modern education incorporates strong elements of collaborative learning: activities that prompt students to collaborate on completing learning tasks. In this work we investigate the relationship between media type and student collaboration and attribution patterns during collaborative content creation. We run similarity analyses on text and video artifacts submitted by students as part of collaborative exercises in an undergraduate module. Our main finding is that the same cohort of students was significantly more likely to attribute non-original content to its sources when authoring text compared to video content and when this content is not produced by a peer student. Our preliminary results based on only two media suggest that media type has a considerable impact on student collaborative behavior. We conclude that media type must be taken into consideration when designing collaborative learning exercises and addressing issues of academic integrity and copyright infringements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2018
Keywords
Collaborative content creation, Collaborative learning, Copyright, Fair use, Remixing, User-generated content, Copyrights, Interactive computer systems, Students, Content creation, Groupware
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247103 (URN)10.1145/3272973.3274092 (DOI)000482113000086 ()2-s2.0-85058100179 (Scopus ID)9781450360180 (ISBN)
Conference
21st ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2018, 3 November 2018 through 7 November 2018
Note

QC 20190404

Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Kannabiran, G., Ahmed, A. A., Wood, M., Balaam, M., Tanenbaum, J. G., Bardzell, S. & Bardzell, J. (2018). Design for sexual wellbeing in HCI. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID W09.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design for sexual wellbeing in HCI
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2018 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id W09Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This workshop focuses on the design of digital interactive technology for promoting sexual wellbeing as a fundamental human rights issue and social justice concern in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Sexuality related topics have garnered much interest in recent years and there is a need to explicitly engage with the intersections of sexuality and social justice as applicable to the design and development of digital interfaces and interactive experiences. This one day workshop will raise interdisciplinary issues, identify research gaps, gather resources, and share innovation strategies for designing sociotechnical interfaces that promote sexual wellbeing in HCI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Design, Human rights, Sexual wellbeing, Social justice
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-234129 (URN)10.1145/3170427.3170639 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052017470 (Scopus ID)9781450356206 (ISBN)9781450356213 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2018, Montreal, Canada, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018
Note

QC 20180903

Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
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