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Martín-Yerga, Daniel
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Martín-Yerga, D., Costa-García, A. & Unwin, P. R. (2019). Correlative Voltammetric Microscopy: Structure-Activity Relationships in the Microscopic Electrochemical Behavior of Screen Printed Carbon Electrodes.. ACS sensors
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlative Voltammetric Microscopy: Structure-Activity Relationships in the Microscopic Electrochemical Behavior of Screen Printed Carbon Electrodes.
2019 (English)In: ACS sensors, ISSN 2379-3694Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) are widely used for electrochemical sensors. However, little is known about their electrochemical behavior at the microscopic level. In this work, we use voltammetric scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), with dual-channel probes, to determine the microscopic factors governing the electrochemical response of SPCEs. SECCM cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements are performed directly in hundreds of different locations of SPCEs, with high spatial resolution, using a sub-µm sized probe. Further, the localized electrode activity is spatially-correlated to co-located surface structure information from scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. This approach is applied to two model electrochemical processes: hexaammineruthenium (III/II) ([Ru(NH3)6]3+/2+), a well-known outer-sphere redox couple; and dopamine (DA) which undergoes a more complex electron-proton coupled electro-oxidation, with complications from adsorption of both DA and side-products. The electrochemical reduction of [Ru(NH3)6]3+ proceeds fairly uniformly across the surface of SPCEs on the sub-µm scale. In contrast, DA electro-oxidation shows a strong dependence on the microstructure of the SPCE. By studying this process at different concentrations of DA, the relative contributions of (i) intrinsic electrode kinetics and (ii) adsorption of DA are elucidated in detail, as a function of local electrode character and surface structure. These studies provide major new insights on the electrochemical activity of SPCEs and further position voltammetric SECCM as a powerful technique for the electrochemical imaging of complex, heterogeneous and topographically rough electrode surfaces.

National Category
Physical Chemistry Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255718 (URN)10.1021/acssensors.9b01021 (DOI)000483440000027 ()31353890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071224853 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190902

Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Martín-Yerga, D., Henriksson, G. & Cornell, A. M. (2019). Effects of Incorporated Iron or Cobalt on the Ethanol Oxidation Activity of Nickel (Oxy)Hydroxides in Alkaline Media. Electrocatalysis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Incorporated Iron or Cobalt on the Ethanol Oxidation Activity of Nickel (Oxy)Hydroxides in Alkaline Media
2019 (English)In: Electrocatalysis, ISSN 1868-2529, E-ISSN 1868-5994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nickel (oxy)hydroxides (NiOxHy) are promising cost-effective materials that exhibit a fair catalytic activity for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) and could be used for sustainable energy conversion. Doping the NiOxHy structure with other metals could lead to enhanced catalytic properties but more research needs to be done to understand the role of the doping metal on the EOR. We prepared NiOxHy films doped with Fe or Co with different metallic ratios by electrodeposition and evaluated the EOR. We found a positive and negative effect on the catalytic activity after the incorporation of Co and Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that Ni atoms are the active sites for the EOR since Tafel slopes were similar on the binary and pristine nickel (oxy)hydroxides and that the formal potential of the Ni(II)/Ni(III) redox couple is a good descriptor for the EOR activity. This work also highlights the importance of controlled metal doping on catalysts and may help in the design and development of improved materials for the EOR.

National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255716 (URN)10.1007/s12678-019-00531-8 (DOI)000486206000004 ()2-s2.0-85065205442 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190828

Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Martín-Yerga, D. (2019). Electrochemical Detection and Characterization of Nanoparticles with Printed Devices. Biosensors, 9(2), Article ID 47.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrochemical Detection and Characterization of Nanoparticles with Printed Devices
2019 (English)In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 47Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Innovative methods to achieve the user-friendly, quick, and highly sensitive detection of nanomaterials are urgently needed. Nanomaterials have increased importance in commercial products, and there are concerns about the potential risk that they entail for the environment. In addition, detection of nanomaterials can be a highly valuable tool in many applications, such as biosensing. Electrochemical methods using disposable, low-cost, printed electrodes provide excellent analytical performance for the detection of a wide set of nanomaterials. In this review, the foundations and latest advances of several electrochemical strategies for the detection of nanoparticles using cost-effective printed devices are introduced. These strategies will equip the experimentalist with an extensive toolbox for the detection of nanoparticles of different chemical nature and possible applications ranging from quality control to environmental analysis and biosensing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
biosensing, electrochemical detection, electrochemistry, environmental analysis, low-cost analytical devices, nanoparticles, printed electrodes
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Physical Chemistry Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255717 (URN)10.3390/bios9020047 (DOI)000477008100001 ()30925772 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063933306 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190809

Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Pereira da Silva Neves, M. M. & Martín-Yerga, D. (2018). Advanced Nanoscale Approaches to Single-(Bio)entity Sensing and Imaging. Biosensors, 8(4), Article ID 100.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advanced Nanoscale Approaches to Single-(Bio)entity Sensing and Imaging
2018 (English)In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 100Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individual (bio)chemical entities could show a very heterogeneous behaviour under the same conditions that could be relevant in many biological processes of significance in the life sciences. Conventional detection approaches are only able to detect the average response of an ensemble of entities and assume that all entities are identical. From this perspective, important information about the heterogeneities or rare (stochastic) events happening in individual entities would remain unseen. Some nanoscale tools present interesting physicochemical properties that enable the possibility to detect systems at the single-entity level, acquiring richer information than conventional methods. In this review, we introduce the foundations and the latest advances of several nanoscale approaches to sensing and imaging individual (bio)entities using nanoprobes, nanopores, nanoimpacts, nanoplasmonics and nanomachines. Several (bio)entities such as cells, proteins, nucleic acids, vesicles and viruses are specifically considered. These nanoscale approaches provide a wide and complete toolbox for the study of many biological systems at the single-entity level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
single-entity, single-molecule, single-cell, nanoprobes, nanopores, nanoimpacts, nanoplasmonics, nanomachines
National Category
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-241338 (URN)10.3390/bios8040100 (DOI)000454821900014 ()30373209 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055665738 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190121

Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Martín-Yerga, D., Perez-Junquera, A., Begona Gonzalez-Garcia, M., Hernandez-Santos, D. & Fanjul-Bolado, P. (2018). In Situ Spectroelectrochemical Monitoring of Dye Bleaching after Electrogeneration of Chlorine-Based Species: Application to Chloride Detection. Analytical Chemistry, 90(12), 7442-7449
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In Situ Spectroelectrochemical Monitoring of Dye Bleaching after Electrogeneration of Chlorine-Based Species: Application to Chloride Detection
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2018 (English)In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 90, no 12, p. 7442-7449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spectroelectrochemical techniques are becoming increasingly versatile tools to solve a diverse range of analytical problems. Herein, the use of in situ real-time luminescence spectroelectrochemistry to quantify chloride ions is demonstrated. Utilizing the bleaching effect of chlorine-based electrogenerated products after chloride oxidation, it is shown that the fluorescence of the rhodamine 6G dye decreases proportionally to the initial chloride concentration in solution. A strong decrease of fluorescence is observed in acidic media compared to a lower decrease in alkaline media, which suggests that Cl-2, favorably generated at low pH, could be the main species responsible for the fluorescence loss. This fact is corroborated with chronoamperometric measurements where the complete loss of fluorescence for the bulk solution is achieved. A fast mass transfer is needed to explain this behavior, in agreement with the generation of gaseous species such as Cl-2. Chloride detection was performed in artificial sweat samples in less than 30 s with great accuracy. This electrochemical/optical combined approach allows us to quantify species that are difficult to measure by electrochemistry due to the inadequate resolution of their redox processes or being without significant optical properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240227 (URN)10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00942 (DOI)000436028800050 ()29775045 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049046566 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181214

Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Martín-Yerga, D., Pérez-Junquera, A., González-García, M. B., Hernández-Santos, D. & Fanjul-Bolado, P. (2018). Towards single-molecule: In situ electrochemical SERS detection with disposable substrates. Chemical Communications, 54(45), 5748-5751
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards single-molecule: In situ electrochemical SERS detection with disposable substrates
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2018 (English)In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 54, no 45, p. 5748-5751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dynamic time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry demonstrates the strong influence of nanostructuring and surface charge of in situ activated disposable substrates for SERS detection. Under specific conditions, a large enhancement factor and estimated calculations agree with the feasible detection of only a few molecules, approaching the limit of single-entity detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-230057 (URN)10.1039/c8cc02069h (DOI)000434314500018 ()2-s2.0-85047905130 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180612

Available from: 2018-06-12 Created: 2018-06-12 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
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