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Pitt, Christine
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Pitt, C., Plangger, K. A., Botha, E., Kietzmann, J. & Pitt, L. (2019). How employees engage with B2B brands on social media: Word choice and verbal tone. Industrial Marketing Management, 81, 130-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How employees engage with B2B brands on social media: Word choice and verbal tone
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2019 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 81, p. 130-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marketing scholars and practitioners are keenly interested in brand engagement in social media because brand engagement has strong links to brand equity. However, much of the marketing literature focuses on customer brand engagement and often in a consumer market setting. This paper advances this literature in two ways by (1) focusing on employees, not customers, as important stakeholders who frequently engage with brands on social media, and by (2) observing brand engagement in a business-to-business context. We develop a conceptual framework based on a theory of word choice and verbal tone to understand the content of engagement observations (i.e., reviews) that breaks into five content dimensions-activity, optimism, certainty, realism, commonality-and four calculated dimensions-insistence, embellishment, variety, and complexity. Then, we examine over 6300 job reviews authored by employees of B2B firms to explore the differences in the way employees engage with both highly-ranked, and-rated brands versus low-ranked and-rated brands. We find that there are significant differences in nearly all the theoretical dimensions, yet the effect sizes are much larger between high versus low review ratings compared to high versus low B2B brand ranking. We close with some important managerial implications and future research directions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2019
Keywords
B2B brand engagement, Employee-based brand equity, Social media engagement, Review content analysis, Word choice and verbal tone
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261340 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.09.012 (DOI)000486357200013 ()2-s2.0-85034608422 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191007

Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Mills, A. J., Pitt, C. & Ferguson, S. L. (2019). The Relationship between Fake News And Advertising Brand Management in the Era Of Programmatic Advertising and Prolific Falsehood. Journal of Advertising Research, 59(1), 3-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Relationship between Fake News And Advertising Brand Management in the Era Of Programmatic Advertising and Prolific Falsehood
2019 (English)In: Journal of Advertising Research, ISSN 0021-8499, E-ISSN 1740-1909, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ADVERTISING RESEARCH FOUNDATION, 2019
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247826 (URN)10.2501/JAR-2019-007 (DOI)000460287300002 ()
Note

QC 20190326

Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Pitt, C., Botha, E., Ferreira, J. J. & Kietzmann, J. (2018). Employee brand engagement on social media: Managing optimism and commonality. Business Horizons, 61(4), 635-642
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employee brand engagement on social media: Managing optimism and commonality
2018 (English)In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 635-642Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers how employees engage with B2B firms on social media, a topic that is largely overlooked in the extant brand engagement literature. Using the results from a large-scale study of employee brand engagement on social media, we identify two key drivers of employee brand engagement using the content analysis tool DICTION-namely, optimism and commonality. Employees of top-ranked and -rated firms express higher levels of optimism and commonality in their reviews of their employers on social media than do their counterparts in bottom-ranked and -rated firms. This permits the construction of a 2 x 2 matrix that allows managers to diagnose strategies for increasing or improving employee brand engagement. This creates four different kinds of employee brand engagement situations, and offers human resources and marketing managers different strategies in each case. We demonstrate how practitioners and scholars can shed new light on the way stake-holders engage with brands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
B2B brand engagement, Social media analytics, Employee brand engagement, Employer marketing, Human resource management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232620 (URN)10.1016/j.bushor.2018.04.001 (DOI)000438002100014 ()2-s2.0-85047405650 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20180731

Available from: 2018-07-31 Created: 2018-07-31 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Pitt, C., Mulvey, M. & Kietzmann, J. (2018). Quantitative insights from online qualitative data: An example from the health care sector. Psychology & Marketing, 35(12), 1010-1017
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative insights from online qualitative data: An example from the health care sector
2018 (English)In: Psychology & Marketing, ISSN 0742-6046, E-ISSN 1520-6793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1010-1017Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Among the deluge of online data generated by users in the form of text on social media sites, health care reviews are among the most common, and potentially, the most insightful. Patients review and comment on the experiences with procedures as varied as hysterectomies, colonoscopies, and chemotherapy. In their attempts to reduce the uncertainty associated with medical treatments, many patients nowadays also turn to social media, where they rely on the experiences articulated by other patients. In this study, IBM Watson is used to examine how knee replacement patients talk about their emotions and express sentiment through their comments online. Then, a latent class cluster modeling procedure is used to segment these patients into distinct groups, according to their emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise), sentiment, and their overall satisfaction with knee replacement surgery. The findings show how qualitative online data can be transformed into quantitative insights regarding underlying market segments, which could then be targeted through different strategies by both marketers and health care practitioners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2018
Keywords
artificial intelligence, credence goods, health care, latent class (LC) cluster modeling, sentiment analysis
National Category
Applied Psychology Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239467 (URN)10.1002/mar.21152 (DOI)000449717300012 ()2-s2.0-85055994129 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181126

Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
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