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Edfors, Fredrik
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Uhlén, M., Karlsson, M., Zhong, W., Abdellah, T., Pou, C., Mikes, J., . . . Brodin, P. (2019). A genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of protein-coding genes in human blood cells. Science, 366(6472), 1471-+, Article ID eaax9198.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of protein-coding genes in human blood cells
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2019 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 366, no 6472, p. 1471-+, article id eaax9198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood is the predominant source for molecular analyses in humans, both in clinical and research settings. It is the target for many therapeutic strategies, emphasizing the need for comprehensive molecular maps of the cells constituting human blood. In this study, we performed a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of protein-coding genes in sorted blood immune cell populations to characterize the expression levels of each individual gene across the blood cell types. All data are presented in an interactive, open-access Blood Atlas as part of the Human Protein Atlas and are integrated with expression profiles across all major tissues to provide spatial classification of all protein-coding genes. This allows for a genome-wide exploration of the expression profiles across human immune cell populations and all major human tissues and organs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-266527 (URN)10.1126/science.aax9198 (DOI)000503861000045 ()31857451 (PubMedID)
Note

QC 20200205

Available from: 2020-02-05 Created: 2020-02-05 Last updated: 2020-02-05Bibliographically approved
Hober, A., Edfors, F., Ryaboshapkina, M., Malmqvist, J., Rosengren, L., Percy, A. J., . . . Miliotis, T. (2019). Absolute Quantification of Apolipoproteins Following Treatment with Omega-3 Carboxylic Acids and Fenofibrate Using a High Precision Stable Isotope-labeled Recombinant Protein Fragments Based SRM Assay. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 18(12), 2433-2446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Absolute Quantification of Apolipoproteins Following Treatment with Omega-3 Carboxylic Acids and Fenofibrate Using a High Precision Stable Isotope-labeled Recombinant Protein Fragments Based SRM Assay
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2019 (English)In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 2433-2446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptides are used as internal standards in targeted proteomics to provide robust protein quantification, which is required in clinical settings. However, SIS peptides are typically added post trypsin digestion and, as the digestion efficiency can vary significantly between peptides within a protein, the accuracy and precision of the assay may be compromised. These drawbacks can be remedied by a new class of internal standards introduced by the Human Protein Atlas project, which are based on SIS recombinant protein fragments called SIS PrESTs. SIS PrESTs are added initially to the sample and SIS peptides are released on trypsin digestion. The SIS PrEST technology is promising for absolute quantification of protein biomarkers but has not previously been evaluated in a clinical setting. An automated and scalable solid phase extraction workflow for desalting and enrichment of plasma digests was established enabling simultaneous preparation of up to 96 samples. Robust high-precision quantification of 13 apolipoproteins was achieved using a novel multiplex SIS PrEST-based LC-SRM/MS Tier 2 assay in non-depleted human plasma. The assay exhibited inter-day coefficients of variation between 1.5% and 14.5% (median = 3.5%) and was subsequently used to investigate the effects of omega-3 carboxylic acids (OM3-CA) and fenofibrate on these 13 apolipoproteins in human plasma samples from a randomized placebo-controlled trial, EFFECT I (NCT02354976). No significant changes were observed in the OM3-CA arm, whereas treatment with fenofibrate significantly increased apoAII and reduced apoB, apoCI, apoE and apoCIV levels. The reduction in apoCIV following fenofibrate treatment is a novel finding. The study demonstrates that SIS PrESTs can facilitate the generation of robust multiplexed biomarker Tier 2 assays for absolute quantification of proteins in clinical studies. Applications of LC-SRM in clinical research are still limited. SIS PrEST are a novel class of standards added prior to trypsinization. We have developed a semi-automated sample preparation workflow and a SIS PrEST LC-SRM/MS Tier 2 assay for absolute quantification of 13 apolipoproteins in human plasma and applied it on clinical samples from the EFFECT I study. We demonstrate, for the first time, that SIS PrEST can be applied for exploratory biomarker research in clinical settings and capture drug effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SOC BIOCHEMISTRY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INC, 2019
Keywords
Clinical trials, assay development, targeted mass spectrometry, selected reaction monitoring, absolute quantification, apolipoproteins, fenofibrate and omega-3 carboxylic acids, NAFLD, SIS PrEST
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-266286 (URN)10.1074/mcp.RA119.001765 (DOI)000501288700007 ()31591263 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075958078 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20200108

Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Remnestål, J., Nellgård, B., Vunk, H., Kotol, D., Edfors, F., . . . Fredolini, C. (2019). Development of parallel reaction monitoring assays for cerebrospinal fluid proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease. Clinica Chimica Acta, 494, 79-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of parallel reaction monitoring assays for cerebrospinal fluid proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease
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2019 (English)In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 494, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Detailed knowledge of protein changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) across healthy and diseased individuals would provide a better understanding of the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we selected 20 brain-enriched proteins previously identified in CSF by antibody suspension bead arrays (SBA) to be potentially biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and verified these using an orthogonal approach. We examined the same set of 94 CSF samples from patients affected by AD (including preclinical and prodromal), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), non-AD dementia and healthy individuals, which had previously been analyzed by SBA. Twenty-eight parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assays were developed and 13 of them could be validated for protein quantification. Antibody profiles were verified by PRM. For seven proteins, the antibody profiles were highly correlated with the PRM results (r > 0.7) and GAP43, VCAM1 and PSAP were identified as potential markers of preclinical AD. In conclusion, we demonstrate the usefulness of targeted mass spectrometry as a tool for the orthogonal verification of antibody profiling data, suggesting that these complementary methods can be successfully applied for comprehensive exploration of CSF protein levels in neurodegenerative disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
AD, Alzheimer's disease, Biomarkers, Cerebrospinal fluid, Parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), Suspension bead array (SBA), alpha 1 aantitrypsin, alpha 1 antichymotrypsin, apolipoprotein, biological marker, cathepsin D, cholecystokinin, creatine kinase B type, dickkopf related protein 3, fibrinogen alpha, fructose bisphosphate aldolase C, glucose regulated protein 94, inter alpha trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1, leucine rich alpha 2 glycoprotein, neurobeachin, neurofilament medium polypeptide, neuromodulin, plasminogen, prosaposin, protein S100B, SPARC like protein 1, unclassified drug, vascular cell adhesion protein 1, adult, aged, Alzheimer disease, Article, clinical article, cohort analysis, controlled study, correlational study, disease course, female, human, male, mass spectrometry, middle aged, mild cognitive impairment, multiple reaction monitoring, priority journal, protein blood level, protein cerebrospinal fluid level, protein microarray, suspension bead array, very elderly
National Category
Medical Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252444 (URN)10.1016/j.cca.2019.03.243 (DOI)000470950400013 ()2-s2.0-85063002689 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190715

Available from: 2019-07-15 Created: 2019-07-15 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Edfors, F., Forsström, B., Vunk, H., Kotol, D., Fredolini, C., Maddalo, G., . . . Uhlén, M. (2019). Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics. Journal of Proteome Research, 18(7), 2706-2718
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 2706-2718Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The availability of proteomics resources hosting protein and peptide standards, as well as the data describing their analytical performances, will continue to enhance our current capabilities to develop targeted proteomics methods for quantitative biology. This study describes the analysis of a resource of 26,840 individually purified recombinant protein fragments corresponding to more than 16,000 human protein-coding genes. The resource was screened to identify proteotypic peptides suitable for targeted proteomics efforts, and we report LC-MS/MS assay coordinates for more than 25,000 proteotypic peptides, corresponding to more than 10,000 unique proteins. Additionally, peptide formation and digestion kinetics were, for a subset of the standards, monitored using a time-course protocol involving parallel digestion of isotope-labeled recombinant protein standards and endogenous human plasma proteins. We show that the strategy by adding isotope-labeled recombinant proteins before trypsin digestion enables short digestion protocols (<= 60 min) with robust quantitative precision. In a proof-of-concept study, we quantified 23 proteins in human plasma using assay parameters defined in our study and used the standards to describe distinct clusters of individuals linked to different levels of LPA, APOE, SERPINAS, and TFRC. In summary, we describe the use and utility of a resource of recombinant proteins to identify proteotypic peptides useful for targeted proteomics assay development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
Keywords
targeted proteomics, stable isotope standards, mass spectrometry, protein quantification, recombinant proteins, protein fragment, trypsin digestion, spectral library, assay generation, peptide formation
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255390 (URN)10.1021/acs.jproteome.8b00924 (DOI)000474795500003 ()31094526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067403932 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190730

Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Uhlén, M., Karlsson, M. J., Hober, A., Svensson, A.-S., Scheffel, J., Kotol, D., . . . Sivertsson, Å. (2019). The human secretome. Science Signaling, 12(609), Article ID eaaz0274.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The human secretome
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2019 (English)In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 12, no 609, article id eaaz0274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The proteins secreted by human cells (collectively referred to as the secretome) are important not only for the basic understanding of human biology but also for the identification of potential targets for future diagnostics and therapies. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of proteins predicted to be secreted in human cells, which provides information about their final localization in the human body, including the proteins actively secreted to peripheral blood. The analysis suggests that a large number of the proteins of the secretome are not secreted out of the cell, but instead are retained intracellularly, whereas another large group of proteins were identified that are predicted to be retained locally at the tissue of expression and not secreted into the blood. Proteins detected in the human blood by mass spectrometry-based proteomics and antibody-based immuno-assays are also presented with estimates of their concentrations in the blood. The results are presented in an updated version 19 of the Human Protein Atlas in which each gene encoding a secretome protein is annotated to provide an open-access knowledge resource of the human secretome, including body-wide expression data, spatial localization data down to the single-cell and subcellular levels, and data about the presence of proteins that are detectable in the blood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-265462 (URN)10.1126/scisignal.aaz0274 (DOI)000499099300003 ()31772123 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075677906 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191218

Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Edfors, F., Hober, A., Linderbäck, K., Maddalo, G., Azimi, A., Sivertsson, Å., . . . Uhlén, M. (2018). Enhanced validation of antibodies for research applications. Nature Communications, 9, Article ID 4130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced validation of antibodies for research applications
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2018 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 4130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for standardized validation methods for antibody specificity and selectivity. Recently, five alternative validation pillars were proposed to explore the specificity of research antibodies using methods with no need for prior knowledge about the protein target. Here, we show that these principles can be used in a streamlined manner for enhanced validation of research antibodies in Western blot applications. More than 6,000 antibodies were validated with at least one of these strategies involving orthogonal methods, genetic knockdown, recombinant expression, independent antibodies, and capture mass spectrometry analysis. The results show a path forward for efforts to validate antibodies in an application-specific manner suitable for both providers and users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237096 (URN)10.1038/s41467-018-06642-y (DOI)000446566000016 ()30297845 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054574300 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20181030

Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Jahn, M., Vialas, V., Karlsen, J., Maddalo, G., Edfors, F., Forsström, B., . . . Hudson, E. P. (2018). Growth of Cyanobacteria Is Constrained by the Abundance of Light and Carbon Assimilation Proteins. Cell reports, 25(2), 478-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth of Cyanobacteria Is Constrained by the Abundance of Light and Carbon Assimilation Proteins
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2018 (English)In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 478-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cyanobacteria must balance separate demands for energy generation, carbon assimilation, and biomass synthesis. We used shotgun proteomics to investigate proteome allocation strategies in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as it adapted to light and inorganic carbon (C-i) limitation. When partitioning the proteome into seven functional sectors, we find that sector sizes change linearly with growth rate. The sector encompassing ribosomes is significantly smaller than in E. coli, which may explain the lower maximum growth rate in Synechocystis. Limitation of light dramatically affects multiple proteome sectors, whereas the effect of C-i limitation is weak. Carbon assimilation proteins respond more strongly to changes in light intensity than to C-i. A coarse-grained cell economy model generally explains proteome trends. However, deviations from model predictions suggest that the large proteome sectors for carbon and light assimilation are not optimally utilized under some growth conditions and may constrain the proteome space available to ribosomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
et al., 2018
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237095 (URN)10.1016/j.celrep.2018.09.040 (DOI)000446691400020 ()30304686 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054193580 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceSwedish Research Council Formas, 2015-939Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RBP14-0013
Note

QC 20181029

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
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