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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Das, I., Chen, H., Maddalo, G., Wilhelm, M., Tuominen, R., Hoiom, V., . . . Brage, S. (2019). Elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the combination treatment effects of Afatinib (EGFR/HER2 inhibitor) and Crizotinib (MET inhibitor) in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Paper presented at 49th Annual Meeting of the European-Society-for-Dermatological-Research (ESDR), SEP 18-21, 2019, Bordeaux, FRANCE. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 139(9), S298-S298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the combination treatment effects of Afatinib (EGFR/HER2 inhibitor) and Crizotinib (MET inhibitor) in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM)
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 139, no 9, p. S298-S298Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2019
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261024 (URN)10.1016/j.jid.2019.07.539 (DOI)000485661500484 ()
Conference
49th Annual Meeting of the European-Society-for-Dermatological-Research (ESDR), SEP 18-21, 2019, Bordeaux, FRANCE
Note

QC 20191002

Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Edfors, F., Forsström, B., Vunk, H., Kotol, D., Fredolini, C., Maddalo, G., . . . Uhlén, M. (2019). Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics. Journal of Proteome Research, 18(7), 2706-2718
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 2706-2718Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The availability of proteomics resources hosting protein and peptide standards, as well as the data describing their analytical performances, will continue to enhance our current capabilities to develop targeted proteomics methods for quantitative biology. This study describes the analysis of a resource of 26,840 individually purified recombinant protein fragments corresponding to more than 16,000 human protein-coding genes. The resource was screened to identify proteotypic peptides suitable for targeted proteomics efforts, and we report LC-MS/MS assay coordinates for more than 25,000 proteotypic peptides, corresponding to more than 10,000 unique proteins. Additionally, peptide formation and digestion kinetics were, for a subset of the standards, monitored using a time-course protocol involving parallel digestion of isotope-labeled recombinant protein standards and endogenous human plasma proteins. We show that the strategy by adding isotope-labeled recombinant proteins before trypsin digestion enables short digestion protocols (<= 60 min) with robust quantitative precision. In a proof-of-concept study, we quantified 23 proteins in human plasma using assay parameters defined in our study and used the standards to describe distinct clusters of individuals linked to different levels of LPA, APOE, SERPINAS, and TFRC. In summary, we describe the use and utility of a resource of recombinant proteins to identify proteotypic peptides useful for targeted proteomics assay development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
Keywords
targeted proteomics, stable isotope standards, mass spectrometry, protein quantification, recombinant proteins, protein fragment, trypsin digestion, spectral library, assay generation, peptide formation
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-255390 (URN)10.1021/acs.jproteome.8b00924 (DOI)000474795500003 ()31094526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067403932 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190730

Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-07-30Bibliographically approved
Edfors, F., Hober, A., Linderbäck, K., Maddalo, G., Azimi, A., Sivertsson, Å., . . . Uhlén, M. (2018). Enhanced validation of antibodies for research applications. Nature Communications, 9, Article ID 4130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced validation of antibodies for research applications
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2018 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 4130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for standardized validation methods for antibody specificity and selectivity. Recently, five alternative validation pillars were proposed to explore the specificity of research antibodies using methods with no need for prior knowledge about the protein target. Here, we show that these principles can be used in a streamlined manner for enhanced validation of research antibodies in Western blot applications. More than 6,000 antibodies were validated with at least one of these strategies involving orthogonal methods, genetic knockdown, recombinant expression, independent antibodies, and capture mass spectrometry analysis. The results show a path forward for efforts to validate antibodies in an application-specific manner suitable for both providers and users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237096 (URN)10.1038/s41467-018-06642-y (DOI)000446566000016 ()30297845 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054574300 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20181030

Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-10-30Bibliographically approved
Jahn, M., Vialas, V., Karlsen, J., Maddalo, G., Edfors, F., Forsström, B., . . . Hudson, E. P. (2018). Growth of Cyanobacteria Is Constrained by the Abundance of Light and Carbon Assimilation Proteins. Cell reports, 25(2), 478-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth of Cyanobacteria Is Constrained by the Abundance of Light and Carbon Assimilation Proteins
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2018 (English)In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 478-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cyanobacteria must balance separate demands for energy generation, carbon assimilation, and biomass synthesis. We used shotgun proteomics to investigate proteome allocation strategies in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as it adapted to light and inorganic carbon (C-i) limitation. When partitioning the proteome into seven functional sectors, we find that sector sizes change linearly with growth rate. The sector encompassing ribosomes is significantly smaller than in E. coli, which may explain the lower maximum growth rate in Synechocystis. Limitation of light dramatically affects multiple proteome sectors, whereas the effect of C-i limitation is weak. Carbon assimilation proteins respond more strongly to changes in light intensity than to C-i. A coarse-grained cell economy model generally explains proteome trends. However, deviations from model predictions suggest that the large proteome sectors for carbon and light assimilation are not optimally utilized under some growth conditions and may constrain the proteome space available to ribosomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
et al., 2018
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237095 (URN)10.1016/j.celrep.2018.09.040 (DOI)000446691400020 ()30304686 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054193580 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceSwedish Research Council Formas, 2015-939Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RBP14-0013
Note

QC 20181029

Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2297-6488

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