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Karpouzoglou, Timon
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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Termeer, C. J. A., Feindt, P. H., Karpouzoglou, T., Poppe, K. J., Hofstede, G. J., Kramer, K., . . . Meuwissen, M. P. M. (2019). Institutions and the resilience of biobased production systems: the historical case of livestock intensification in the Netherlands. Ecology & society, 24(4), Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutions and the resilience of biobased production systems: the historical case of livestock intensification in the Netherlands
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2019 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 24, no 4, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disconnects between farming and urban systems are widely seen as impairing the resilience of biobased production systems (BBPSs). However, the institutional mechanisms that underlie these resilience problems are not well understood. In this explorative paper, which integrates elements from institutional and resilience theory, we develop a framework to analyze how institutionally shaped patterns of connects and disconnects affect the resilience of BBPs along the dimensions of robustness, adaptability, and transformability. This framework is applied to the historical case of pig livestock intensification in the Netherlands from 1870 to 2017. The case shows that institutions, successfully established in earlier periods, shape connects and disconnects in subsequent periods, thereby enabling and constraining resilience. A combination of perturbations, institutional layering, and shifts in ideational power is an important institutional mechanism for resilience. We conclude that building resilience requires a variety of reconnecting institutions and refraining from a focus on local reconnects or certification only.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Resilience Alliance, 2019
Keywords
biobased production system, connects, institutions, livestock, resilience
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-263310 (URN)10.5751/ES-11206-240415 (DOI)
Note

QC 20191106

Available from: 2019-11-05 Created: 2019-11-05 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Regmi, S. R., Gurung, P., Zulkafli, Z., Karpouzoglou, T., Tocachi, B. O., Buytaert, W. & Mao, F. (2019). Learning to cope with water variability through participatory monitoring: the case study of the mountainous region , Nepal. Meteorology Hydrology and Water Management, 7(2), 49-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning to cope with water variability through participatory monitoring: the case study of the mountainous region , Nepal
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2019 (English)In: Meteorology Hydrology and Water Management, ISSN 2299-3835, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Participatory monitoring allows communities to understand the use and management of local water resources and at the same time develop a sense of ownership of environmental information. The data generated through participatory monitoring of stream flow and rainfall generate evidences to corroborate local people's experiences with changing water resources patterns. In this study we evaluate the potential of participatory monitoring of hydrological variables to improve scarce water supply utilization in agriculture. The case study site is the Mustang district in Nepal, which is located in the upper Kaligandaki river basin in the Himalayas with unique and complex geographical and climatic features. This region is characterized by a semi-arid climate with total annual precipitation of less than 300 mm. Water supply, agricultural land, and livestock grazing are the key ecosystem services that underpin livelihood security of the local population, particularly socio-economically vulnerable groups. An analysis of the measured stream flow data indicate that annual flow of water in the stream can meet the current crop irrigation water needs for the agricultural land of the research site. The data provide local farmers a new way of understanding local water needs. Participatory monitoring would contribute to an optimization of the use of ecosystem services to support economic development and livelihood improvement.

Keywords
accepted 28 march 2019, agriculture, ecosystem services, irrigation, nepal, participatory monitoring, revised 16 december 2018, submitted 29 august 2018, water
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-251749 (URN)10.26491/mhwm/106021 (DOI)
Note

QC 20190627

Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Grainger, S., Hommes, L., Karpouzoglou, T., Perez, K., Buytaert, W. & Dewulf, A. (2019). The development and intersection of highland-coastal scale frames: a case study of water governance in central Peru. JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & PLANNING, 21(4), 373-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development and intersection of highland-coastal scale frames: a case study of water governance in central Peru
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2019 (English)In: JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & PLANNING, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 373-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scale framing makes an important difference to how complex environmental policy issues are defined and understood by different groups of actors. Increasing urban water demand and uncertain future climatic conditions in the Andes present major water governance challenges for the coastal regions of Peru. An understudied dimension of Peruvian water governance is how scale framing shapes the way problems are defined, and solutions are pursued. Here, we aim to strengthen the understanding of scale framing as it relates to highland-coastal interactions in central Peru between 2004 and 2015. By analysing this period of significant water governance reforms, we identify five prominent water-related frame dimensions and three differently scaled policy storylines and reveal how they developed and intersected over time. The storylines, supported by particular visualisations, either foreground 'urbanshed'-level investment in water supply infrastructure, community-level cultural restoration for improved local agricultural production, or nationwide watershed-level financial mechanisms for highland ecosystem conservation. Our study shows how the intersection of these storylines at different moments during the policy process often had a strengthening effect, creating a coalition of actors who were then able to generate sufficient momentum and support within the Peruvian government for the implementation of conservation-based watershed investments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
Scale framing, visualisations, highland watershed conservation, urban water supply, water governance, Peru
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259460 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2019.1566057 (DOI)000482498100005 ()2-s2.0-85062329551 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190920

Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Dewulf, A., Karpouzoglou, T., Warner, J., Wesselink, A., Mao, F., Vos, J., . . . Buytaert, W. (2019). The power to define resilience in social–hydrological systems: Toward a power-sensitive resilience framework. Paper presented at 2019/09/27. WIREs Water, Article ID e1377.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The power to define resilience in social–hydrological systems: Toward a power-sensitive resilience framework
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2019 (English)In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, article id e1377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Since the early work on defining and analyzing resilience in domains such as engineering, ecology and psychology, the concept has gained significant traction in many fields of research and practice. It has also become a very powerful justification for various policy goals in the water sector, evident in terms like flood resilience, river resilience, and water resilience. At the same time, a substantial body of literature has developed that questions the resilience concept's systems ontology, natural science roots and alleged conservatism, and criticizes resilience thinking for not addressing power issues. In this study, we review these critiques with the aim to develop a framework for power-sensitive resilience analysis. We build on the three faces of power to conceptualize the power to define resilience. We structure our discussion of the relevant literature into five questions that need to be reflected upon when applying the resilience concept to social?hydrological systems. These questions address: (a) resilience of what, (b) resilience at what scale, (c) resilience to what, (d) resilience for what purpose, and (e) resilience for whom; and the implications of the political choices involved in defining these parameters for resilience building or analysis. Explicitly considering these questions enables making political choices explicit in order to support negotiation or contestation on how resilience is defined and used. This article is categorized under: Human Water > Water Governance. Engineering Water > Planning Water.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2019
Keywords
power, resilience, social–hydrological systems
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260356 (URN)10.1002/wat2.1377 (DOI)000485624200001 ()
Conference
2019/09/27
Note

QC 20191001

Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T., Tri, V. A., Ahmed, F., Warner, J. & Hoang, L. (2019). Unearthing the ripple effects of power and resilience in large river deltas. Environmental Science and Policy, 98(March 2018), 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unearthing the ripple effects of power and resilience in large river deltas
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 98, no March 2018, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historically, flood resilience in large river deltas has been strongly tied to institutional and infrastructural interventions to manage flood risk (such as building of embankments and drainage structures). However, the introduction of infrastructural works has inevitably brought unforeseen, major consequences, such as biodiversity and accelerated land subsidence, endangering the fertile characteristics that made them interesting places to live in in the first place. These ripple effects have sparked, a reconsideration of what deltas are, questioning the very separation and control between nature and culture, and how deltas are to be dealt with. These effects have further sparked changing modalities of power that tend to be overlooked by delta and resilience scholars alike. As a result, there is a real risk that future interventions to increase resilience, will in fact amplify unequal power relations in deltas as opposed to alleviating them. If the system as a whole has achieved some level of flood resilience (partly due to the flood defence mechanisms in place), does infrastructure have a differential effect on people's mobility under flood conditions? Are some groups experiencing less rather than more security, as water accumulates in some places but not others? This paper presents theoretical insights on the relationship between power and resilience in delta regions supported by two case studies, the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta in Bangladesh and the Mekong delta in Vietnam.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Bangladesh, Flood, Power, Resilience, River Deltas, Vietnam
National Category
Social Sciences Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-251423 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2019.04.011 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065206725 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190610

Available from: 2019-05-14 Created: 2019-05-14 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T. (2018). Reconciling equity and resilience of food systems in major river deltas of South East Asia. In: : . Paper presented at Greening Agri-food Systems, Ensuring Rural Sustainability and Promoting Healthy Socioeconomic Transformation in Southeast Asia, Bangkok, Chulalongkorn University.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconciling equity and resilience of food systems in major river deltas of South East Asia
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-240311 (URN)
Conference
Greening Agri-food Systems, Ensuring Rural Sustainability and Promoting Healthy Socioeconomic Transformation in Southeast Asia, Bangkok, Chulalongkorn University
Note

QC 20181217

Available from: 2018-12-15 Created: 2018-12-15 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T., Marshall, F. & Mehta, L. (2018). Towards a peri-urban political ecology of water quality decline. Land Use Policy, 70(November 2017), 485-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a peri-urban political ecology of water quality decline
2018 (English)In: Land Use Policy, Vol. 70, no November 2017, p. 485-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent years have witnessed an expanding body of peri-urban and urban scholarship. However, recent scho- larship has yet to adequately address the central role of politics and power shaping water quality decline. The article focuses on the trans-Hindon region which is part of Ghaziabad city, close to India’s capital, Delhi. We draw upon urban political ecology and peri-urban scholarship to explain the role of politics and power shaping water quality decline. We argue in favour of creating stronger synergy between peri-urban and UPE debates as part of conceptualizing water quality decline. The article shows that as a complex socio-political challenge, water quality decline is centrally shaped by the intensifying linkages between urban and peri-urban forms of development and as a result deserves central attention as part of both these debates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239697 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2017.11.004 (DOI)000419416600047 ()2-s2.0-85035314906 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181217

Available from: 2018-12-01 Created: 2018-12-01 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T. & Mao, F. (2018). What lies ahead? The future of Earth and Society as an adaptive system.. In: Eustathios Chiotis (Ed.), Climate Changes in the Holocene: Impacts and Human Adaptation. London: CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What lies ahead? The future of Earth and Society as an adaptive system.
2018 (English)In: Climate Changes in the Holocene: Impacts and Human Adaptation / [ed] Eustathios Chiotis, London: CRC Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: CRC Press, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-252754 (URN)9780815365938 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20190819

Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T. & Pereira, L. M. (2017). Bridging ICTs with governance capabilities for food – energy – water sustainability. In: Food, Energy and Water Sustainability Emergent Governance Strategies: . London & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging ICTs with governance capabilities for food – energy – water sustainability
2017 (English)In: Food, Energy and Water Sustainability Emergent Governance Strategies, London & New York: Routledge , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Routledge, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239695 (URN)10.4324/9781315696522 (DOI)2-s2.0-8504997449 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20181213

Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T. & Vij, S. (2017). Waterscape: a perspective for understanding the contested geography of water. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waterscape: a perspective for understanding the contested geography of water
2017 (English)In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The waterscape is a perspective that has captured the imagination of diverse scholars interested in the interaction of water and society. This includes the way water travels in time and space and is shaped by culture and geography. In this article, we pay particular attention to the study of the waterscape in the political ecology tradition. Scholars following this tradition have placed strong emphasis on understanding the role of power and the contested nature of water in diverse rural, urban, and periurban landscapes. The article provides a brief account of the main strands of literature and serves the purpose of an introductory overview of the waterscape for beginners. We focus both on major works that have helped define the waterscape as a perspective in political ecology and recent studies on the role of unequal power and gender relationships, informal water practices, and local water flows such as ponds and wastewater.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239700 (URN)10.1002/wat2.1210 (DOI)
Note

QC 20181217

Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
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