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Wang, Zhen
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Li, H., Asta, N., Wang, Z., Pettersson, T. & Wågberg, L. (2024). Reevaluation of the adhesion between cellulose materials using macro spherical beads and flat model surfaces. Carbohydrate Polymers, 332, 121894-121894, Article ID 121894.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reevaluation of the adhesion between cellulose materials using macro spherical beads and flat model surfaces
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2024 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 332, p. 121894-121894, article id 121894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions between dry cellulose were studied using model systems, cellulose beads, and cellulose films, usingcustom-built contact adhesion testing equipment. Depending on the configuration of the substrates in contact,Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film, cellulose films spin-coated either on PDMS or glass, the interaction showsthree distinct processes. Firstly, molecular interlocking is formed between cellulose and cellulose when there is asoft PDMS thin film backing the cellulose film. Secondly, without backing, no initial attraction force between thesurfaces is observed. Thirdly, a significant force increase, ΔF, is observed during the retraction process for cel­lulose on glass, and there is a maximum in ΔF when the retraction rate is increased. This is due to the kinetics of acontacting process occurring in the interaction zone between the surfaces caused by an interdigitation of a finefibrillar structure at the nano-scale, whereas, for the spin-coated cellulose surfaces on the PDMS backing, there isa more direct adhesive failure. The results have generated understanding of the interaction between cellulose-rich materials, which helps design new, advanced cellulose-based materials. The results also show thecomplexity of the interaction between these surfaces and that earlier mechanisms, based on macroscopic materialtesting, are simply not adequate for molecular tailoring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2024
Keywords
Interaction, Cellulose thin film, Cellulose bead, Contact adhesion testing
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-344920 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2024.121894 (DOI)001183175200001 ()38431407 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184997085 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20240408

Available from: 2024-04-03 Created: 2024-04-03 Last updated: 2024-04-08
Jain, K., Wang, Z., Garma, L. D., Engel, E., Ciftci, G. C., Fager, C., . . . Wågberg, L. (2023). 3D printable composites of modified cellulose fibers and conductive polymers and their use in wearable electronics. APPLIED MATERIALS TODAY, 30, Article ID 101703.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D printable composites of modified cellulose fibers and conductive polymers and their use in wearable electronics
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2023 (English)In: APPLIED MATERIALS TODAY, ISSN 2352-9407, Vol. 30, article id 101703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are many bioelectronic applications where the additive manufacturing of conductive polymers may be of use. This method is cheap, versatile and allows fine control over the design of wearable electronic devices. Nanocellulose has been widely used as a rheology modifier in bio-based inks that are used to print electrical components and devices. However, the preparation of nanocellulose is energy and time consuming. In this work an easy-to-prepare, 3D-printable, conductive bio-ink; based on modified cellulose fibers and poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), is presented. The ink shows excellent printability, the printed samples are wet stable and show excellent electrical and electrochemical performance. The printed structures have a conductivity of 30 S/cm, high tensile strains (>40%), and specific capacitances of 211 F/g; even though the PEDOT:PSS only accounts for 40 wt% of the total ink composition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and Raman spectroscopy data show that the modified cellulose fibers induce conformational changes and phase separation in PEDOT:PSS. It is also demonstrated that wearable supercapacitors and biopotential-monitoring devices can be prepared using this ink.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
Keywords
Dialcohol-modified cellulose fibers, 3D printing, Conducting polymer, PEDOT:PSS, Bioelectronics
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-323583 (URN)10.1016/j.apmt.2022.101703 (DOI)000912019800001 ()2-s2.0-85143488124 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230208

Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2023-02-08Bibliographically approved
Wang, Z., Heasman, P., Rostami, J., Benselfelt, T., Linares, M., Li, H., . . . Wågberg, L. (2023). Dynamic Networks of Cellulose Nanofibrils Enable Highly Conductive and Strong Polymer Gel Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries. Advanced Functional Materials, 33(30), Article ID 2212806.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Networks of Cellulose Nanofibrils Enable Highly Conductive and Strong Polymer Gel Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries
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2023 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 30, article id 2212806Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tunable dynamic networks of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are utilized to prepare high-performance polymer gel electrolytes. By swelling an anisotropically dewatered, but never dried, CNF gel in acidic salt solutions, a highly sparse network is constructed with a fraction of CNFs as low as 0.9%, taking advantage of the very high aspect ratio and the ultra-thin thickness of the CNFs (micrometers long and 2–4 nm thick). These CNF networks expose high interfacial areas and can accommodate massive amounts of the ionic conductive liquid polyethylene glycol-based electrolyte into strong homogeneous gel electrolytes. In addition to the reinforced mechanical properties, the presence of the CNFs simultaneously enhances the ionic conductivity due to their excellent strong water-binding capacity according to computational simulations. This strategy renders the electrolyte a room-temperature ionic conductivity of 0.61 ± 0.12 mS cm−1 which is one of the highest among polymer gel electrolytes. The electrolyte shows superior performances as a separator for lithium iron phosphate half-cells in high specific capacity (161 mAh g−1 at 0.1C), excellent rate capability (5C), and cycling stability (94% capacity retention after 300 cycles at 1C) at 60 °C, as well as stable room temperature cycling performance and considerably improved safety compared with commercial liquid electrolyte systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2023
Keywords
cellulose nanofibrils, composites, energy storages, lithium-ion batteries, polymer electrolytes
National Category
Materials Chemistry Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-338472 (URN)10.1002/adfm.202212806 (DOI)000973324900001 ()2-s2.0-85152801974 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20231115

Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2023-11-15Bibliographically approved
Li, H., Kruteva, M., Dulle, M., Wang, Z., Mystek, K., Ji, W., . . . Wågberg, L. (2022). Understanding the Drying Behavior of Regenerated Cellulose Gel Beads: The Effects of Concentration and Nonsolvents. ACS Nano, 16(2), 2608-2620
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the Drying Behavior of Regenerated Cellulose Gel Beads: The Effects of Concentration and Nonsolvents
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2022 (English)In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 2608-2620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The drying behavior of regenerated cellulose gel beads swollen with different nonsolvents (e.g., water, ethanol, water/ethanol mixtures) is studied in situ on the macroscopic scale with an optical microscope as well as on nanoscale using small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques. Depending on the cellulose concentration, the structural evolution of beads during drying follows one of three distinct regimes. First, when the cellulose concentration is lower than 0.5 wt %, the drying process comprises three steps and, regardless of the water/ethanol mixture composition, a sharp structural transition corresponding to the formation of a cellulose II crystalline structure is observed. Second, when the cellulose concentration is higher than 5.0 wt %, a two-step drying process is observed and no structural transition occurs for any of the beads studied. Third, when the cellulose concentration is between 0.5 and 5.0 wt %, the drying process is dependent on the nonsolvent composition. A three-step drying process takes place for beads swollen with water/ethanol mixtures with a water content higher than 20%, while a two-step drying process is observed when the water content is lower than 20%. To describe the drying behavior governed by the cellulose concentration and nonsolvent composition, a simplified phase diagram is proposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2022
Keywords
regenerated cellulose, gel bead, drying kinetics, nonsolvent, cellulose concentration
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-311536 (URN)10.1021/acsnano.1c09338 (DOI)000776691400078 ()35104108 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124278208 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220429

Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-29 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Wang, Z., Ouyang, L., Li, H., Wågberg, L. & Hamedi, M. M. (2021). Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Strong Thin Films with High Lithium Ion Conductance for Batteries and Beyond. Small, 17(32), 2100954, Article ID 2100954.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Strong Thin Films with High Lithium Ion Conductance for Batteries and Beyond
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2021 (English)In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 17, no 32, p. 2100954-, article id 2100954Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most widely used polymeric ion conductors which has the potential for a wide range of applications in energy storage. The enhancement of ionic conductivity of PEO-based electrolytes is generally achieved by sacrificing the mechanical properties. Using layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly with a nanoscale precision, mechanically strong and self-healable PEO/polyacrylic acid composite thin films with a high Li+ conductivity of 2.3 ± 0.8 × 10−4 S cm−1 at 30 °C, and a strength of 3.7 MPa is prepared. These values make the LbL composite among the best recorded multifunctional solid electrolytes. The electrolyte thin film withstands at least 1000 cycles of striping/plating of Li at 0.05 mA cm−2. It is further shown that the LbL thin films can be used as separators for Li-ion batteries to deliver a capacity of 116 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C in an all-LbL-assembled lithium iron phosphate/lithium titanate battery. Finally, it is demonstrated that the thin films can be used as ion-conducting substrates for flexible electrochemical devices, including micro supercapacitors and electrochemical transistors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2021
Keywords
ionic conduction, lithium-ion batteries, mechanical strength, self-assembly, Energy storage, Ions, Iron compounds, Lithium compounds, Nanocomposite films, Polyethylene oxides, Self assembly, Solid electrolytes, Thin film lithium ion batteries, Composite thin films, Electrochemical transistors, Electrolyte thin film, Layer by layer self assembly, Layer-by-layer assemblies, Lithium iron phosphates, Micro supercapacitors, Polyethylene oxide (PEO), Thin films
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-310407 (URN)10.1002/smll.202100954 (DOI)000668744600001 ()34212496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85109300382 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220331

Available from: 2022-03-31 Created: 2022-03-31 Last updated: 2022-12-07Bibliographically approved
Wang, Z., VahidMohammadi, A., Ouyang, L., Erlandsson, J., Tai, C.-W., Wågberg, L. & Hamedi, M. (2021). Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Nanostructured Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries. Small, 17(6), Article ID 2006434.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Nanostructured Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries
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2021 (English)In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 17, no 6, article id 2006434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gaining control over the nanoscale assembly of different electrode components in energy storage systems can open the door for design and fabrication of new electrode and device architectures that are not currently feasible. This work presents aqueous layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly as a route towards design and fabrication of advanced lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with unprecedented control over the structure of the electrode at the nanoscale, and with possibilities for various new designs of batteries beyond the conventional planar systems. LbL self-assembly is a greener fabrication route utilizing aqueous dispersions that allow various Li+ intercalating materials assembled in complex 3D porous substrates. The spatial precision of positioning of the electrode components, including ion intercalating phase and electron-conducting phase, is down to nanometer resolution. This capable approach makes a lithium titanate anode delivering a specific capacity of 167 mAh g−1 at 0.1C and having comparable performances to conventional slurry-cast electrodes at current densities up to 100C. It also enables high flexibility in the design and fabrication of the electrodes where various advanced multilayered nanostructures can be tailored for optimal electrode performance by choosing cationic polyelectrolytes with different molecular sizes. A full-cell LIB with excellent mechanical resilience is built on porous insulating foams. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2021
Keywords
3D electrodes, compressible batteries, energy storage, nanomaterials, self-assembly, Electrodes, Fabrication, Ions, Lithium compounds, Nanotechnology, Polyelectrolytes, Substrates, Advanced lithium-ion batteries, Cationic polyelectrolyte, Conventional slurries, Device architectures, Energy storage systems, Multilayered nanostructures, Nano-structured electrodes, Nanometer resolutions, Lithium-ion batteries
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-292535 (URN)10.1002/smll.202006434 (DOI)000603151700001 ()33373094 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85098124739 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20210409

Available from: 2021-04-09 Created: 2021-04-09 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
Ouyang, L., Buchmann, S., Benselfelt, T., Musumeci, C., Wang, Z., Khaliliazar, S., . . . Hamedi, M. (2021). Rapid prototyping of heterostructured organic microelectronics using wax printing, filtration, and transfer. Journal of Materials Chemistry C, 9(41), 14596-14605
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid prototyping of heterostructured organic microelectronics using wax printing, filtration, and transfer
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 14596-14605Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), 2021
National Category
Organic Chemistry Materials Chemistry Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-307127 (URN)10.1039/d1tc03599a (DOI)000698441100001 ()34765224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118600456 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 715268
Note

QC 20220128

Available from: 2022-01-13 Created: 2022-01-13 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Francon, H., Wang, Z., Marais, A., Mystek, K., Piper, A., Granberg, H., . . . Wågberg, L. (2020). Ambient-Dried, 3D-Printable and Electrically Conducting Cellulose Nanofiber Aerogels by Inclusion of Functional Polymers. Advanced Functional Materials, 30(12), Article ID 1909383.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambient-Dried, 3D-Printable and Electrically Conducting Cellulose Nanofiber Aerogels by Inclusion of Functional Polymers
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2020 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 12, article id 1909383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study presents a novel, green, and efficient way of preparing crosslinked aerogels from cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) and alginate using non-covalent chemistry. This new process can ultimately facilitate the fast, continuous, and large-scale production of porous, light-weight materials as it does not require freeze-drying, supercritical CO2 drying, or any environmentally harmful crosslinking chemistries. The reported preparation procedure relies solely on the successive freezing, solvent-exchange, and ambient drying of composite CNF-alginate gels. The presented findings suggest that a highly-porous structure can be preserved throughout the process by simply controlling the ionic strength of the gel. Aerogels with tunable densities (23-38 kg m(-3)) and compressive moduli (97-275 kPa) can be prepared by using different CNF concentrations. These low-density networks have a unique combination of formability (using molding or 3D-printing) and wet-stability (when ion exchanged to calcium ions). To demonstrate their use in advanced wet applications, the printed aerogels are functionalized with very high loadings of conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate (PEDOT:TOS) polymer by using a novel in situ polymerization approach. In-depth material characterization reveals that these aerogels have the potential to be used in not only energy storage applications (specific capacitance of 78 F g(-1)), but also as mechanical-strain and humidity sensors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2020
Keywords
aerogels, cellulose, nanofibers, organic electronics, poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene)
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-300715 (URN)10.1002/adfm.201909383 (DOI)000510685400001 ()2-s2.0-85078930679 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20210903

Available from: 2021-09-03 Created: 2021-09-03 Last updated: 2023-03-01Bibliographically approved
Wang, Z., Zou, W., Zhao, H., Guo, J., Qian, Z., Li, R., . . . Xu, J. (2020). Dual-Tunable Structural Colors from Liquid-Infused Aerogels. Advanced Optical Materials, 8(7), Article ID 1901825.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual-Tunable Structural Colors from Liquid-Infused Aerogels
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2020 (English)In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 1901825Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Herein, dual-tunable structural colors generated from liquid-infused, robust silsesquioxane aerogels due to the specific light scattering by the aerogel skeleton in liquids with matching refractive indices, are reported. The colors are tunable by changing the temperature and the composition of the liquid that roots from the coherence between the colors and the refractive index of the infused liquid. The finding provides new insights and tools for constructing structural colors and light management. It also opens applications of stimuli-responsive smart windows, displays, and sensors. Taking advantage of the penetrable light of selected wavelength, the 3D structures of aerogel skeletons are reconstructed by an optical method, which provides a facile alternative approach to characterizing aerogel structure and will be instrumental to the understanding of the relationship between skeleton structure and mechanical property of porous 3D structures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2020
Keywords
aerogels, Mie's scattering, refractive indices, stimuli response, structural colors, Color, Light scattering, Liquids, Musculoskeletal system, Refractive index, Aerogel structures, Light management, Optical methods, Skeleton structure, Stimuli-responsive, Structural color
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-277258 (URN)10.1002/adom.201901825 (DOI)000511238100001 ()2-s2.0-85079074411 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20200630

Available from: 2020-06-30 Created: 2020-06-30 Last updated: 2022-12-07Bibliographically approved
Hajian, A., Wang, Z., Berglund, L. A. A. & Hamedi, M. M. (2019). Cellulose Nanopaper with Monolithically Integrated Conductive Micropatterns. Advanced Electronic Materials, 5(3), Article ID 1800924.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellulose Nanopaper with Monolithically Integrated Conductive Micropatterns
2019 (English)In: Advanced Electronic Materials, E-ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1800924Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work presents a route to fabricate micropatterned conductive structures where the conductors are monolithically integrated with nanocellulose-based paper. To fabricate conductive features, microstructures are patterned on filter papers using wax-printing, followed by vacuum filtration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or silver nanowires (AgNWs) dispersed in aqueous cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). These patterns are then laminated onto a pure CNF substrate (both in gel-state) and dried to form cellulose nanopapers with integrated conductive micropatterns. Resolutions of the conductive features are shown down to 400 µm wide, 250 nm thick, and with conductivity values of 115 ± 5 S cm −1 for the CNF–CNT and 3770 ± 230 S cm −1 for the CNF–AgNW micropatterns. The nanopaper and the conductive patterns both constitute random fibrous networks, and they display similar ductility and swelling behavior in water. Thus, the integrated conductive micropatterns can withstand folding, as well as wetting cycles. This stability of the micropatterns makes them useful in various devices based on nanocellulose substrates. As an example, an electroanalytical nanopaper device that operates in wet conditions is demonstrated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
Keywords
carbon nanotubes, nanocelluloses, nanopapers, nanowires, printed electronics
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246492 (URN)10.1002/aelm.201800924 (DOI)000461544600030 ()2-s2.0-85060195677 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190319

Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
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