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Lingegård, S. & von Oelreich, K. (2023). Implementation and management of a circular public procurement contract for furniture. Frontiers in Sustainability, 4, Article ID 1136725.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation and management of a circular public procurement contract for furniture
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 4, article id 1136725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Circular public procurement (CPP) is one way to increase sustainability and circularity in public spending. As previous research focuses primarily on procurement, more insight is needed on the latter stages CPP. Real-life examples of CPP implementation are also required to promote the concept to practitioners, improve governance, and add depth to the literature. This study, therefore, provides in-depth knowledge of CPP implementation and management by analyzing a case of circular furniture flows and its implications for the procuring organization. The focus on furniture is motivated by the large volumes sent to landfills every year despite its remanufacturing potential, as well as the large environmental impact for production, a potentially long lifetime, and an often-high purchasing price. The results show that strategic decisions to prioritize sustainability are necessary when resource efficiency and cost reductions do not align in a short-term perspective. A more centralized governance structure facilitates decisions on reuse, remanufacturing and disposal in an organization, e.g., coordination of products for remanufacturing, pooling products for reuse, and standardization of design choices. Follow-up and inventory systems are crucial tools for integrating previously installed products with CPP, keeping track of circular flows, and providing feedback to improve subsequent procurements. Crucial elements in the follow-up include adaptation to circularity in the economy system and accounting for the prolonged life and reuse of furniture. The study's results emphasize how an organization's prerequisites play an essential part in the implementation of CPP and that contextual solutions are needed for circular challenges. The study contributes to the fields of policy implementation, CPP, and the use of circular business models in a public context, as well as to the less explored field of procurement in a circular economy context. Suggestions for future research include studies on product categories with other environmental impact profiles, and on waste management regulations that can make or break circular systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA, 2023
Keywords
circular economy (CE), furniture, organizational change, product-service systems (PSS), public procurement, remanufacturing
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-331581 (URN)10.3389/frsus.2023.1136725 (DOI)2-s2.0-85158918518 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20231122

Available from: 2023-07-13 Created: 2023-07-13 Last updated: 2023-11-22Bibliographically approved
Nathaniel, H., Franzén, D., Lingegård, S., Franzen, F., Soderqvist, T. & Gröndahl, F. (2023). Using stakeholder perceptions to deepen the understanding of beachcast governance and management practices on Gotland, Sweden. Ocean and Coastal Management, 239, Article ID 106583.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using stakeholder perceptions to deepen the understanding of beachcast governance and management practices on Gotland, Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 239, article id 106583Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326876 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2023.106583 (DOI)000968662300001 ()2-s2.0-85151027595 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230515

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Söderqvist, T., Nathaniel, H., Franzén, D., Franzén, F., Hasselström, L., Gröndahl, F., . . . Thomas, J.-B. (2022). Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region. Ambio, 51(5), 1302-1313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region
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2022 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 1302-1313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Harvesting beach-cast can help mitigate marine eutrophication by closing land-marine nutrient loops and provide a blue biomass raw material for the bioeconomy. Cost–benefit analysis was applied to harvest activities during 2009–2018 on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, highlighting benefits such as nutrient removal from the marine system and improved recreational opportunities as well as costs of using inputs necessary for harvest. The results indicate that the activities entailed a net gain to society, lending substance to continued funding for harvests on Gotland and assessments of upscaling of harvest activities to other areas in Sweden and elsewhere. The lessons learnt from the considerable harvest experience on Gotland should be utilized for developing concrete guidelines for carrying out sustainable harvest practice, paying due attention to local conditions but also to what can be generalized to a wider national and international context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Beach recreation, Beach wrack, Bioeconomy, Circular economy, Eutrophication, Nutrient loops, biomass, cost-benefit analysis, marine environment, pollutant removal, spatiotemporal analysis, Atlantic Ocean, Baltic Sea, Gotland, Sweden, nitrogen, Baltic States, cost benefit analysis, Nutrients
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-313251 (URN)10.1007/s13280-021-01641-8 (DOI)000719717500001 ()34787831 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119203226 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220613

Available from: 2022-06-13 Created: 2022-06-13 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Eriksson, P. E., Lingegård, S. & Järvenpää, A.-T. -. (2022). Innovation outcomes and processes in infrastructure projects–a co mparative study of Design-Build and Design-Build-Maintenance contracts. Construction Management and Economics, 40(2), 142-156
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation outcomes and processes in infrastructure projects–a co mparative study of Design-Build and Design-Build-Maintenance contracts
2022 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 142-156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Innovation is often seen as essential for long-term development in the construction industry, but its actual outcomes and processes in construction projects require more attention. Many studies on procurement strategies and delivery systems have focussed on the public transport infrastructure sector, whereas most construction innovation scholars have addressed the innovation phenomenon in construction generally. Thus, the purpose of this study is to compare how two delivery systems, design-build (DB) and design-build-maintenance (DBM), influence project-level innovation. Findings are based on empirical data from a multiple case study of six infrastructure projects, three with DB contracts and three with DBM contracts, in which 12 innovations are identified, described, and compared. The findings show that various kinds of innovations in terms of outcomes and processes are implemented in infrastructure projects, and that the delivery system do effect both dimensions. Long maintenance responsibilities tend to spur contractors to engage in early exploration of sustainable solutions that could be of long-term benefit. The research contributes to procurement literature by exemplifying how delivery systems influence both the outcomes and processes of project-level innovations. It also increases our knowledge about construction innovation as a multi-dimensional phenomenon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa UK Limited, 2022
Keywords
case study, construction innovation, delivery system, design-build, life-cycle perspective, maintenance, Project-level, Construction industry, Life cycle, Model buildings, Case-studies, Delivery systems, Design designs, Design/build, Infrastructure project, Life cycle perspectives, Long-term development, Maintenance contracts, Project levels, comparative study, design method, infrastructure, innovation, project management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-319163 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2021.2024864 (DOI)000743322000001 ()2-s2.0-85122850870 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220928

Available from: 2022-09-28 Created: 2022-09-28 Last updated: 2022-09-28Bibliographically approved
Lingegård, S., Havenvid, M. I. & Eriksson, P.-E. (2021). Circular Public Procurement through Integrated Contracts in the Infrastructure Sector. Sustainability, 13(21), 11983
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circular Public Procurement through Integrated Contracts in the Infrastructure Sector
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 21, p. 11983-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Public clients’ procurement strategies are central in facilitating innovation towards sustainability. In the infrastructure sector, the three main project activities—design, production, and maintenance—are traditionally not procured in an integrated way, which results in sub-optimizations and a lack of life cycle perspective. As project actors are accustomed to traditional, non-integrated forms of contract, implementing integrated contracts imposes fundamental changes to the interdependencies among actors, resources, and activities. This study analyzes the interfaces among key project actors and the related interdependencies across design, production, and maintenance in Design–Build–Maintain contracts, and initiates a discussion on how to manage these interdependencies when implementing integrated contracts. This study of circular public procurement (CPP) focused on three infrastructure projects using integrated contracting and applied the industrial network approach (INA) to analyze interdependencies in how they may influence innovation and sustainable development. The study found significant obstacles to clients obtaining the benefits of integrated contracting and concludes that understanding interdependencies is necessary to implement integrated contracts successfully. The study contributes to the construction management literature by adapting the INA to contracting, and to the CPP literature by providing empirical evidence of sustainability and circularity in infrastructure projects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2021
Keywords
circular public procurement; interdependencies; integrated contracts; design–build–maintain; infrastructure projects; industrial network approach; sustainability; life cycle perspective; sustainable public procurement
National Category
Environmental Management Environmental Engineering Construction Management
Research subject
Real Estate and Construction Management; Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-305167 (URN)10.3390/su132111983 (DOI)000720039200001 ()2-s2.0-85118159079 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 254-2013-1837Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2016-126
Note

QC 20211124

Available from: 2021-11-22 Created: 2021-11-22 Last updated: 2023-03-02Bibliographically approved
Lingegård, S., Olsson, J. A., Kadefors, A. & Uppenberg, S. (2021). Sustainable Public Procurement in Large Infrastructure Projects—Policy Implementation for Carbon Emission Reductions. Sustainability, 13(20), 11182-11182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Public Procurement in Large Infrastructure Projects—Policy Implementation for Carbon Emission Reductions
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 20, p. 11182-11182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The infrastructure construction sector is a significant source of carbon emissions, and more stringent procurement requirements are central to meeting reduction targets in this demand-led and project-based industry. This paper aims to analyze the implementation of international policies for reducing carbon emissions in infrastructure construction, focusing on the interaction between policy ambitions and procurement practices. Based on case studies of large projects and their contexts in five countries worldwide: Australia, the Netherlands, Sweden, the UK, and the US, a cross-country comparison is performed of how policies and practices for carbon reduction develop across multiple implementation levels. Three levels are included in the analysis: policy, industry, and project level. We identify the projects as either drivers of policy goals, frontrunners in industry-level development processes, or translators of national policy. These roles, and the associated pathways for carbon emission reduction, are context-specific and depend on the policy ambitions at the national or regional level, the maturity of the supplier market, and, often, on the strategies of individual champions at the project level. Long-term learning processes, both within and between the various levels, are essential for advancing carbon reduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2021
Keywords
policy implementation; sustainable public procurement; infrastructure; CO2 reduction; carbon emissions; cross-country comparison; green public procurement; case studies
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Real Estate and Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-304322 (URN)10.3390/su132011182 (DOI)000712427300001 ()2-s2.0-85117206160 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 254-2013-1837
Note

QC 20211117

Available from: 2021-11-01 Created: 2021-11-01 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Kadefors, A., Lingegård, S., Uppenberg, S., Alkan-Olsson, J. & Balian, D. (2020). Designing and implementing procurement requirements for carbon reduction in infrastructure construction–international overview and experiences. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing and implementing procurement requirements for carbon reduction in infrastructure construction–international overview and experiences
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon emissions emanating from infrastructure construction are substantial, and public infrastructure clients have begun to include carbon reduction goals in their procurement requirements. This is a new and complex field where practices vary and are still developing. Based on project documentation and interviews we map and analyze the design and implementation of carbon reduction requirements in projects by leading infrastructure clients in Australia, the Netherlands, Sweden, the US and the UK. Procurement requirements were influenced by concerns for tender competition, transaction costs and innovation, and further adapted to project delivery models, market maturity and client capabilities. Increasing awareness of practical and contextual constraints often led to modified strategies. This paper identifies factors that should be considered when designing carbon policies and requirements. This knowledge is important for clients and governments in order to develop more effective strategies for learning between contexts. Policies and future research should address client capabilities to drive long-term innovation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2020
Keywords
Embodied carbon mitigation, construction industry, cross-country study, green public procurement, transport infrastructure
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-285030 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2020.1778453 (DOI)000560472000001 ()2-s2.0-85089566680 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20201230

In press

Available from: 2020-12-30 Created: 2020-12-30 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, P.-E., Volker, L., Kadefors, A., Lingegård, S., Larsson, J. & Rosander, L. (2019). Collaborative procurement strategies for infrastructure projects: a multiple-case study. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Management, procurement and law, 172(5), 197-205, Article ID 1900016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative procurement strategies for infrastructure projects: a multiple-case study
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Management, procurement and law, ISSN 1751-4304, Vol. 172, no 5, p. 197-205, article id 1900016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the announcement to tender a project, several strategic decisions are made that have significant impact on the innovation and efficiency potential of a project. The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare how different types of integrative and collaborative procurement strategies may enhance the opportunities for improved efficiency and innovation in infrastructure projects. Hence, it contributes to the scientific debate on buyer-supplier relationships in relation to project performance. Furthermore, it guides public client organisations in steering explicitly for integration and innovation in their projects. Interview-based case studies of ten public infrastructure projects procured based on four different types of collaborative procurement strategies in Sweden and the Netherlands were conducted. The findings indicate that the duration of the collaboration is fundamental in setting the limits for innovation and that early involvement and long-term commitments in maintenance open up opportunities for more innovation. Naturally, the potential for increased efficiency is higher than for innovation and also occurs in collaborations with limited duration. The findings confirm the importance of a learning perspective on procurement strategies for public client organisations and show the importance of explicit considerations on incentives and project governance issues in the front-end phase of a project.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ICE PUBLISHING, 2019
Keywords
procurement, public-private partnerships
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-264868 (URN)10.1680/jmapl.19.00016 (DOI)000495072300003 ()2-s2.0-85074640148 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20191217

Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2024-05-20Bibliographically approved
Kadefors, A., Uppenberg, S., Alkan-Olsson, J., Balian, D. & Lingegård, S. (2019). Procurement Requirements for Carbon Reduction in Infrastructure Construction Projects: An International Case Study. Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Procurement Requirements for Carbon Reduction in Infrastructure Construction Projects: An International Case Study
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2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Executive Summary

Introduction

Following alarming reports from the IPCC, climate change has engaged policymakers world-wide to chart policies at different administrative levels to mitigate increasing greenhouse gas emissions. The construction sector causes a substantial part of all greenhouse gas emissions, primarily carbon dioxide. Traditionally in this sector, the focus of carbon reduction measures has been on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. Further, various sustainability assessment schemes (BREEAM, LEED, Green Star, etc.) have been developed to assess sustainability performance. More recently, awareness has increased of the considerable greenhouse gas emissions arising from the manufacturing of construction materials and components, and also from construction processes and transport. Consequently, the infrastructure construction sector is now considered as a major source of greenhouse gases. In the UK, The Infrastructure Carbon Review has estimated that the construction, maintenance and operations of infrastructure assets account for 16% of the nation’s total carbon dioxide emissions. It is widely acknowledged that these emissions need to be significantly reduced if the international and national reduction targets are to be met.

About the project

This research project has investigated the institutional and organisational contexts, policies, procurement requirements and implementation strategies used to drive greenhouse gas reduction in large infrastructure projects in five countries world-wide: Australia, The Netherlands, Sweden, the UK and the US (see below for an overview of case study projects). The study is based on interviews with key partners on the client side and in the supply chain of each project. To provide a contextual understanding of the strategies used in these projects, we further include descriptions of the policy background that underlies current strategies and ambitions. Thus, the project traces the pathway from political and organisational goals to actual realisation in projects.

Overview of case studies in the Impres project

Country

Impres case studies

Australia

Sydney Metro Northwest

Newcastle Light Rail

The Netherlands

Motorway A6 Almere

Sweden

Results from the Swedish Transport Administration research project Control Station 2018 - an evaluation of carbon procurement requirements in Swedish infrastructure projects.

UK

High Speed 2

Anglian Water (Grafham WTW Resilience and Dalton Piercy WTW) 

USA

California High-Speed Rail

SFO AirTrain Extension

 

The title of this research project is Implementation of procurement requirements for sustainable collaboration in infrastructure projects, also referred to as Impres. The project is a collaboration between the engineering consultancy firm WSP, the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Lund University and the construction company Skanska. The project is co-financed by Construction Climate Challenge (CCC), a sustainability research fund and network initiated by Volvo Construction Equipment, and the Swedish Research Council Formas. The latter funding comes through a grant for the Strong Research Environment ProcSIBE, Procurement for Sustainable Innovation in the Built Environment[1].

We expect that results from this research project will be useful for decision-makers on the client side that are in charge of developing policies, procurement strategies and procurement requirements to reduce carbon emissions in the construction sector. Further, client and contractor project managers, environmental specialists and procurement staff responsible for implementing policies will be interested in experiences gained in similar initiatives in other countries. In parallel with this report, scientific articles are being developed by the authors to analyse and discuss the results described in this report more thoroughly in relation to other studies and to theory.

Conclusions

In all countries studied, there is an ongoing process to develop and implement policies for carbon reduction in infrastructure projects, with raised ambitions over time. In some cases, the development has initially been driven by a few dedicated individuals, but today there are frameworks and executive mandates in place that would make it hard to avoid carbon reduction commitments. National and regional reduction policies were found to be important in encouraging clients to develop ambitious carbon requirements that can contribute to setting new industry standards.

Carbon reduction measures such as optimisation of constructions, minimised transport, reuse of excavated material and cement clinker replacement are applied in the studied cases. However, most of these measures are also cost efficient and would – or should – have been undertaken in a normal design and construction optimisation process. The positive side of this is that considerable carbon reductions may be achieved within existing budgets, and in most cases will even reduce cost, and that an increased focus on carbon may contribute to finding more such options. However, it also raises the question of what constitutes a relevant reference case, or baseline. Further, to meet the target levels of the Paris agreement, costly measures will also be needed, and this research identified only a few examples of such policies being implemented. 

Goals for carbon reduction are still new to many in the sector, and both clients and industry partners need time to adjust and develop new competencies. In countries with a longer history of carbon management, procurement strategies and requirements have advanced through continuous interaction between clients and industry actors over longer periods of time. Clients are wary of introducing requirements that may limit competition, and requirements to comply with rating schemes or to supply EPDs have been introduced successively to match the development of industry capacity. Award (MEAT) criteria related to carbon are used, but more often to increase awareness of carbon reduction rather than as a substantive basis for selection. Front-runner contractors and material suppliers were found to play important roles in reducing obstacles to innovation-oriented procurement. Moreover, the development of procurement requirements has been aligned with information and training initiatives, tool kits and guidelines to support low-carbon design and the calculation of emissions. In general, client environmental specialists have taken an active part in supporting the implementation of requirements in supply chains.

Procurement requirements are considered important in driving carbon reductions in all countries, but the preferred style of these requirements vary. This diversity was partly related to general carbon management maturity and partly to general contracting practice and policy culture in the country or region. All countries used some form of contract-level reduction requirements, in most cases set in relation to a carbon emissions baseline. Overall, reduction requirements are perceived to encourage innovation, but our results show that such requirements were often more complex than foreseen and associated with administrative costs. First, to produce change and avoid speculation it is important to set requirements and incentives at the right level, which requires awareness on the client side of both the supplier’s competence and of the opportunities for carbon reduction in the specific project. Also, sharp requirements call for equally sharp and transparent performance evaluation. Moreover, much time was spent on calculation and re-calculation of baselines which could detract from measures for actual reduction of carbon emissions. In effect, time constraints in the projects limited the opportunities to involve subcontractors and material suppliers, which meant that all possible reductions were not realised. We conclude that expectations for substantial and innovative carbon reductions through functional reduction requirements may be too high. To influence sub-contractors and suppliers directly, several clients use specific requirements.

Collaborative contracting models are a flexible option to encourage innovation and integrate knowledge of different participants. Many interviewees state the importance of breaking silo-thinking and integrating the supply chain in order to reach greater carbon reductions. Also, long-term alliances allow for continuous learning and more transformational innovation, including incentivising contractors to find ways of fulfilling client goals while building less. However, it should be emphasised that strong client leadership and commitment are essential both to legitimise collaborative contracting models and to achieve more fundamental behavioural change within collaborative projects and alliance schemes.

Clients in mega-projects perceive an obligation to conform to national policy goals and may also have ambitions to be industry-level change agents. Since such projects have vast budgets, last for long periods of time and engage highly competent firms and individuals, they are often expected to show high performance in the area of innovation. However, mega-projects have many goals to fulfil, are technically and organisationally complex and associated with high risks. Therefore, time and willingness to develop new ways of working or implement new technology may be lacking. Further, even large projects may not be long enough to encompass processes to develop, test and approve new solutions. Thus, to support more efficient innovation processes in the industry, a long-term system perspective is needed. Interviewees suggested using smaller pilot projects for quicker testing of new materials, tools and technologies and, once proven, use procurement requirements in large projects to implement these more widely in the market.

Overall, the study shows that the applicability of procurement requirements for carbon reduction is dependent on how well these requirements are aligned with culture, policies and capabilities in the local context. Inspiration may be sought from cutting-edge examples in other countries and regions, but practices may seldom be directly transferred. Also, it is clear that awareness, competence and capacity on the buyer (client) side is a key success factor. Such client capabilities involve constructive collaboration between procurement functions, environmental specialists and project managers. Further, policy makers need to acknowledge that measures to reduce carbon must align with existing procurement and innovation systems. To reach higher levels of ambition for carbon reduction, such institutional structures may also need to be changed.

Recommendations

Based on the findings, our recommendations to the target group of policy-makers and clients are:

Policy level – national, regional and organisational

  • ·         Set high-level goals and policies for carbon reduction in order to sanction ambitious initiatives that contribute to setting new industry standards.
  • ·         To reduce barriers for innovation-oriented procurement requirements, engage industry associations and encourage initiatives by supply-side front-runners.
  • ·         When developing organisational policies and strategies, address not only ambitions but also what roles the client and other parties should have in implementation.

 

Project level policies and procurement requirements

  • ·         When defining requirements, consider implementation costs for setting and following up requirements. In particular, be careful that focus stays on carbon mitigation measures and that calculation of baselines does not impact negatively on carbon management. Assess and mitigate behavioural risks associated with incentives.
  • ·         Ensure that requirements will be effective in influencing all relevant decision-makers in the supply chain (designing engineers, constructors and material suppliers). This implies that time, competence and resources should be available at relevant points in time.
  • ·        Apply a long-term learning perspective and acknowledge that different combinations of award and selection criteria, reduction requirements, specific requirements and rating schemes may be preferable over time.
    • ·         Align requirements and activities with general contracting models and encourage models that enable integration of knowledge and carbon management in the supply chain.

 

Innovation and learning

  • ·         Develop guidelines, tools and training programs to help build industry capabilities.
  • ·         Establish which organisations should drive development, for example commission, host and update guidelines, and provide training and support.
  • ·         Communicate plans for raised ambitions well in advance, for example requirements to comply with established carbon management standards and rating schemes.
  • ·         Orchestrate long-term innovation by combining small pilot projects to test new solutions with systematic implementation in larger projects to achieve wide market dissemination. 
  • ·         Establish transparent procedures for updating client standard specifications based on frontrunner initiatives, planned pilots and academic research.
  • ·         Innovation should also address contracting and business models: develop institutional capabilities that enable and legitimise long-term, strategic collaborative alliances.

 

[1]www.procsibe.se

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019. p. 118
Series
TRITA-ABE-RPT ; 198
Keywords
procurement, carbon reduction, infrastructure, construction, sustainability, megaprojects, policy, public, upphandling, koldioxid, klimat, infrastruktur, byggande, hållbarhet, styrmedel, offentlig upphandling
National Category
Civil Engineering
Research subject
Real Estate and Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253066 (URN)978-91-7873-194-7 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 254-2013-1837Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

QC 20190614

Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Karrbom Gustavsson, T., Kadefors, A., Lingegård, S., Laedre, O., Klakegg, O. J., Olsson, N. & Larsson, J. (2019). Procurement Research: Current State and Future Challenges in the Nordic Countries. In: Irene Lill, Emlyn Witt (Ed.), 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization (Emerald Reach Proceedings Series, Volume 2): . Paper presented at 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization (pp. 195-204). Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Procurement Research: Current State and Future Challenges in the Nordic Countries
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2019 (English)In: 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization (Emerald Reach Proceedings Series, Volume 2) / [ed] Irene Lill, Emlyn Witt, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019, Vol. 2, p. 195-204Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to map previous and current construction procurement research to further develop the research in the Nordic counties.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Mapping of previous and current research based on search in national database. The analysis is based on research perspectives, empirical contexts and research methods.

Findings

That the blind spots are partly overlapping, but that there is potential for knowledge transfer in some areas. There is also the potential for a Nordic research program on one or several of the blind spots.

Research Limitations/Implications

The study is limited to PhD and licentiate-thesis reports in Norway and Sweden. Further research should include the other Nordic countries and a more extensive literature review including journal articles to broaden the scope. Findings have implications on collaborative Nordic research initiatives, knowledge transfer and in a longer perspective on the level of procurement knowledge in industry and society.

Practical Implications

Findings provide a base for future research collaborations, initiatives and applications.

Originality/Value

Findings provide a comprehensive understanding of construction procurement research in the Nordic countries, starting with Norway and Sweden. This understanding is needed for developing research collaborations and applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Series
Emerald Reach Proceedings Series, ISSN 2516-2853
Keywords
Procurement research, Construction, Mapping, Project governance, Building, Infrastructure
National Category
Civil Engineering
Research subject
Real Estate and Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-253139 (URN)10.1108/S2516-285320190000002043 (DOI)2-s2.0-85102827526 (Scopus ID)
Conference
10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 254-2013-1837
Note

QC 20190819

Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6682-9239

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