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Lewandowski, Vincent
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Elblaus, L., Tsaknaki, V., Lewandowski, V., Bresin, R., Hwang, S., Song, J., . . . Taylor, A. (2015). Demo Hour. interactions, 22(5), 6-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demo Hour
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2015 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactivity is a unique forum of the ACM CHI Conference that showcases hands-on demonstrations, novel interactive technologies, and artistic installations. At CHI 2015 in Seoul we hosted more than 30 exhibits, including an invited digital interactive art exhibit. Interactivity highlights the diverse group of computer scientists, sociologists, designers, psychologists, artists, and many more who make up the CHI community.

Keywords
novel interactive technologies, artistic installation
National Category
Design Performing Art Studies Computer Sciences
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-184681 (URN)10.1145/2807918 (DOI)
Note

QC 20190509

Available from: 2016-04-03 Created: 2016-04-03 Last updated: 2022-06-23Bibliographically approved
Elblaus, L., Tsaknaki, V., Lewandowski, V. & Bresin, R. (2015). Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics. In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI 2015 (pp. 275-278). New York, NY, USA: ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY, USA: ACM , 2015, p. 275-278Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present Nebula, a prototype for examining the properties of textiles, fashion accessories, and digital technologies to arrive at a garment design that brings these elements together in a cohesive manner. Bridging the gap between everyday performativity and enactment, we aim at discussing aspects of the making process, interaction and functional aesthetics that emerged. Nebula is part of the Sound Clothes project that aims at exploring the expressive potential of wearable technologies creating sound from motion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2015
Series
CHI EA '15
Keywords
design process, fashion, music computation, wearable technology
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170399 (URN)10.1145/2702613.2725454 (DOI)2-s2.0-84954230456 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3146-3 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI 2015
Projects
SoundClothes
Note

QC 20150630

Available from: 2015-06-30 Created: 2015-06-30 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Šimbelis, V., Lundström, A., Höök, K., Solsona, J. & Lewandowski, V. (2014). Metaphone: Machine aesthetics meets interaction design. In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2014; Toronto, ON; Canada; 26 April 2014 through 1 May 2014 (pp. 1-10). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metaphone: Machine aesthetics meets interaction design
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2014 (English)In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1-10Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Through our art project, Metaphone, we explored a particular form of aesthetics referred to in the arts tradition as machine aesthetics. The Metaphone machine collects the participant's bio-data, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Heart Rate (HR), creating a process of movement, painting and sound. The machine behaves in machine-like, aesthetically evocative ways: A shaft on two large wheels rotates on the floor, carrying paint that is dripped onto a large sheet of aquarelle paper on the floor according to bio-sensor data. A soundscape rhythmically follows the bio-sensor data, but also has its own machine-like sounds. Six commentators were invited to interact with the machine. They reported a strangely relaxing atmosphere induced by the machine. Based on these experiences we discuss how different art styles can help to describe aesthetics in interaction design generally, and how machine aesthetics in particular can be used to create interesting, sustained, stylistically coherent interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014
Keywords
Affective Computing, Bodily Interaction, Interaction Design, Interactive Arts, Machine Aesthetics, Media Arts
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-146798 (URN)10.1145/2556288.2557152 (DOI)000773858600001 ()2-s2.0-84900433599 (Scopus ID)978-145032473-1 (ISBN)
Conference
32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2014; Toronto, ON; Canada; 26 April 2014 through 1 May 2014
Note

QC 20140616

Available from: 2014-06-16 Created: 2014-06-16 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
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