Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Juul Sondergaard, Marie LouiseORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9884-0205
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Parviainen, E. & Juul Sondergaard, M. L. (2020). Experiential Qualities of Whispering with Voice Assistants. In: Proceedings of CHI 2019: . Paper presented at CHI’20, April 25–30, 2020, Honolulu, HI, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiential Qualities of Whispering with Voice Assistants
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of CHI 2019, 2020Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present a Research through Design project that explores how whispering influences the ways people experience and interact with voice assistants. The research project includes a co-speculation workshop and the use of a design probe, which culminated in the production of a design fiction short film. Our design-led inquiry contributes with experiential qualities of whispering with voice assistants: creepiness, trust, and intimacy. Furthermore, we present how whispering opens up new dimensions of how and when voice interaction could be used. We propose that designers of whispering voice assistants should reflect on how they facilitate the experiential qualities of creepiness, trust, and intimacy, and reflect on the potential challenges whispering brings to the relation between a user and a voice assistant.

Keywords
Whispering, voice assistants, design fiction, research through design, voice interaction, experiential qualities
National Category
Design
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-267718 (URN)10:1145/3313831:3376187 (DOI)
Conference
CHI’20, April 25–30, 2020, Honolulu, HI, USA
Note

QC 20200217

Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Campo Woytuk, N., Juul Sondergaard, M. L., Ciolfi Felice, M. & Balaam, M. (2020). Touching and Being in Touch with the Menstruating Body. In: : . Paper presented at CHI 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touching and Being in Touch with the Menstruating Body
2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We describe a Research through Design project—Curious Cycles—a collection of objects and interactions which encourage people to be in close contact with their menstruating body. Throughout a full menstrual cycle, five participants used Curious Cycles to look at their bodies in unfamiliar ways and to touch their bodily fluids, specifically, menstrual blood, saliva, and cervical mucus. The act of touching and looking led to the construction of new knowledge about the self and to a nurturing appreciation for the changing body. Yet, participants encountered and reflected upon frictions within themselves, their home, and their social surroundings, which stem from societal stigma and preconceptions about menstruation and bodily fluids. We call for and show how interaction design can engage with technologies that mediate self-touch as a first step towards reconfiguring the way menstruating bodies are treated in society.

Keywords
Menstrual cycles; research through design; menstruation; feminist HCI; women’s health; touching
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-266768 (URN)
Conference
CHI 2020
Note

This is a pre-print of the paper to be published at CHI 2020. QCR 20200121

Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-21Bibliographically approved
Luu, T., van den Broeck, M. & Juul Sondergaard, M. L. (2018). Data Economy: Interweaving Storytelling and World Building in Design Fiction. In: In: NORDICHI'18: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 10TH NORDIC CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION, ACM Digital Library, 2018: . Paper presented at 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2018; Oslo; Norway; 29 September 2018 through 3 October 2018 (pp. 771-786). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data Economy: Interweaving Storytelling and World Building in Design Fiction
2018 (English)In: In: NORDICHI'18: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 10TH NORDIC CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION, ACM Digital Library, 2018, ACM Digital Library, 2018, p. 771-786Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we explore the design of a design fiction as an iterative process of interweaving storytelling and world building. With the design fiction Data Economy, we present how we have imagined and externalized a data obsessed future through a protagonist, narratives, plots and diegetic prototypes; this includes the short stories Memoirs of Jesse, the short film Data Economy and a number of designed objects. Data Economy explores how far people are willing to go to satisfy their individualistic hunger to consume by creating a tension between consumerism and data collection. By analyzing the design fiction, we discuss social and ethical issues of data privacy. With a focus on narratives, plots, protagonists and diegetic prototypes, we argue that the designerly potential of design fiction lies in its ability to interweave the literary methods of storytelling with the designerly methods of world building.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2018
Series
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259178 (URN)10.1145/3240167.3240270 (DOI)000455775700076 ()2-s2.0-85056577672 (Scopus ID)9781450364379 (ISBN)
Conference
10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2018; Oslo; Norway; 29 September 2018 through 3 October 2018
Note

QC 20190912

Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Juul Sondergaard, M. L. (2018). Staying with the Trouble through Design: Critical-feminist Design of Intimate Technology. (Doctoral dissertation). Aarhus, Denmark: AU Library Scholarly Publishing Services
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staying with the Trouble through Design: Critical-feminist Design of Intimate Technology
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aarhus, Denmark: AU Library Scholarly Publishing Services, 2018
Series
Ph.D. dissertations
Keywords
Interaction design, intimacy, intimate technology, trouble, taboo, gender, speculative design, design fiction, feminist HCI, women's health
National Category
Interaction Technologies Design
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259194 (URN)10.7146/aul.289.203 (DOI)978-87-7507-436-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-13 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Juul Sondergaard, M. L. & Hedegård Schiølin, K. (2017). Bataille’s bicycle: execution and/as eroticism. In: Helen Pritchard, Eric Snodgrass, Magda Tyżlik-Carver (Ed.), Executing Practices: (pp. 179-197). Brooklyn, New York: Open Humanities Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bataille’s bicycle: execution and/as eroticism
2017 (English)In: Executing Practices / [ed] Helen Pritchard, Eric Snodgrass, Magda Tyżlik-Carver, Brooklyn, New York: Open Humanities Press , 2017, p. 179-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brooklyn, New York: Open Humanities Press, 2017
Series
DATA Browser
Keywords
execution, computation, artistic research
National Category
Interaction Technologies Design
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259188 (URN)9781570273216 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20190923

Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Juul Sondergaard, M. L. & Hansen, L. K. (2017). Designing with Bias and Privilege?. In: Proceedings of the 7th Bi-Annual Nordic Design Research Society Conference - Design + Power: . Paper presented at Nordic Design Research conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing with Bias and Privilege?
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th Bi-Annual Nordic Design Research Society Conference - Design + Power, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Focusing on the relation between design and power requires us to understand the designer’s role and position. Based on an understanding of design as ideological and political, we focus on the designer’s position from an intersectional feminist perspective. We present two design objects that aim to critically intervene into agency and power structures, and we analyse how the designer’s position impacts this intervention. With this case, we demonstrate how a simple argument – that what you design is always influenced by your (lack of) privilege – becomes complex when understood in the concrete design practice. The paper contributes with a critical reflection on how a designer is always part of a construction of power and privilege.

National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-258814 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Design Research conference
Note

QC 20190912

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Balaam, M., Hansen, L. K., D’Ignazio, C., Simpson, E., Almeida, T., Kuznetsov, S., . . . Juul Sondergaard, M. L. (2017). Hacking Women’s Health. In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA — May 06 - 11, 2017: . Paper presented at The 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA — May 06 - 11, 2017 (pp. 476-483). ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hacking Women’s Health
Show others...
2017 (English)In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA — May 06 - 11, 2017, ACM , 2017, p. 476-483Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this two-day workshop is to bring together a nascent community of researchers to share research, ideas, methods and tools that can encourage, inspire and strengthen those of us working on digital women's health. Our workshop aims to take a pro-active stance, offering participants the opportunity to critique, design and hack existing and new women's digital health experiences. Or, in other words, to get their hands dirty. Through our hack-led event we aim to face headon issues related to digital women's health, such as taboo, power and prejudice. This workshop will address current gaps in research and practice by enabling us to develop the confidence, networks and strategies that can facilitate researchers/designers/technologists to work within this space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM, 2017
Series
CHI EA ’17
Keywords
digital technology, intimate care, taboo, women’s health
National Category
Interaction Technologies Design
Research subject
Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-259177 (URN)10.1145/3027063.3027085 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019604680 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4656-6 (ISBN)
Conference
The 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA — May 06 - 11, 2017
Note

QC 20190913

Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Juul Sondergaard, M. L. (2017). Intimate Design: Designing Intimacy As a Critical-Feminist Practice. In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2017; Denver; United States; 6 May 2017 through 11 May 2017 (pp. 320-325). ACM Publications, F127655
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intimate Design: Designing Intimacy As a Critical-Feminist Practice
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Publications, 2017, Vol. F127655, p. 320-325Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Intimate aspects of everyday life are increasingly being connected to and interacted with through digital technologies; this impacts the ways of being in the world and how bodies come to matter. From an interdisciplinary perspective at the intersections of feminist HCI, art, and interaction design I examine how design can reflect on and critically discuss political and cultural issues of intimate technologies, such as gender and identity, embodied experiences, privacy, intimate data and sharing. In presenting my PhD project's background, research objectives, hypothesis and methodological approach, as well as its current and future state and research contributions, I discuss how it is possible to research design of intimate technologies from a critical-feminist perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Publications, 2017
Series
CHI EA ’17
Keywords
IoT, critical design, design fiction, feminist HCI, intimacy, research-through-design, self-tracking, speculative design, wearables
National Category
Design Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-258810 (URN)10.1145/3027063.3027138 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019584575 (Scopus ID)9781450346566 (ISBN)
Conference
2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2017; Denver; United States; 6 May 2017 through 11 May 2017
Note

QC 20190912

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Juul Sondergaard, M. L. & Hansen, L. K. (2017). "It's not that it will kill me": Living with electromagnetic hypersensitivity. In: Nordes 2017; Design + Power: . Paper presented at Nordes 2017: Design + Power - The Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway Duration: 15 Jun 2017 → 17 Jun 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It's not that it will kill me": Living with electromagnetic hypersensitivity
2017 (English)In: Nordes 2017; Design + Power, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

While the future visions of Internet of Things are slowly being implemented, the wireless and networked infrastructures that enable these connections already intervene and matter in people’s everyday lives in powerful ways. In this paper, we present a case study of a woman living with electromagnetic hypersensitivity; the heightened sensitivity of electromagnetic fields. We describe how her daily activities and everyday habits are both enabled and constrained by digital technologies. Through this narrative, we reflect on how this case has impact for design research regarding how the objects we design matter in people’s everyday life in unpredictable and uncomfortable ways - also those that are not wirelessly connected.

National Category
Interaction Technologies Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-258818 (URN)
Conference
Nordes 2017: Design + Power - The Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway Duration: 15 Jun 2017 → 17 Jun 2017
Note

QC 20190912

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Juul Sondergaard, M. L. & Hansen, L. K. (2016). PeriodShare: A Bloody Design Fiction. In: Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: . Paper presented at NordiCHI 2016 Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. a113). ACM Press, 23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PeriodShare: A Bloody Design Fiction
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, ACM Press, 2016, Vol. 23, p. a113-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present PeriodShare, a speculative design proposing a wireless menstrual cup that automatically quantifies and shares menstrual data on social networks. We suggest that PeriodShare is a design fiction that uses both crowd-funding rhetoric and the form of a rather clumsy DIY project to create a particular fictional universe that (1) speculates on a potential near future of quantification of menstruation, and through this (2) encourages to reflection on the dynamics of contemporary technology paradigms like the politics and culture of self-tracking, sharing, and intimate data. As a research through design project and by using these communication threads, PeriodShare thus uses menstruation as a trope to investigate social, cultural and political issues of intimate technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2016
Series
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series ; 23
Keywords
Design fiction, menstruation, research through design, self tracking
National Category
Interaction Technologies Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-258811 (URN)10.1145/2971485.2996748 (DOI)000390298600113 ()2-s2.0-84997173097 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4763-1 (ISBN)
Conference
NordiCHI 2016 Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Note

QC 20190912

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9884-0205

Search in DiVA

Show all publications