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Nathaniel, H., Franzén, D., Lingegård, S., Franzen, F., Soderqvist, T. & Gröndahl, F. (2023). Using stakeholder perceptions to deepen the understanding of beachcast governance and management practices on Gotland, Sweden. Ocean and Coastal Management, 239, Article ID 106583.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using stakeholder perceptions to deepen the understanding of beachcast governance and management practices on Gotland, Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 239, article id 106583Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2023
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326876 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2023.106583 (DOI)000968662300001 ()2-s2.0-85151027595 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230515

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Söderqvist, T., Nathaniel, H., Franzén, D., Franzén, F., Hasselström, L., Gröndahl, F., . . . Thomas, J.-B. (2022). Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region. Ambio, 51(5), 1302-1313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost–benefit analysis of beach-cast harvest: Closing land-marine nutrient loops in the Baltic Sea region
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2022 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 1302-1313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Harvesting beach-cast can help mitigate marine eutrophication by closing land-marine nutrient loops and provide a blue biomass raw material for the bioeconomy. Cost–benefit analysis was applied to harvest activities during 2009–2018 on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, highlighting benefits such as nutrient removal from the marine system and improved recreational opportunities as well as costs of using inputs necessary for harvest. The results indicate that the activities entailed a net gain to society, lending substance to continued funding for harvests on Gotland and assessments of upscaling of harvest activities to other areas in Sweden and elsewhere. The lessons learnt from the considerable harvest experience on Gotland should be utilized for developing concrete guidelines for carrying out sustainable harvest practice, paying due attention to local conditions but also to what can be generalized to a wider national and international context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Beach recreation, Beach wrack, Bioeconomy, Circular economy, Eutrophication, Nutrient loops, biomass, cost-benefit analysis, marine environment, pollutant removal, spatiotemporal analysis, Atlantic Ocean, Baltic Sea, Gotland, Sweden, nitrogen, Baltic States, cost benefit analysis, Nutrients
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-313251 (URN)10.1007/s13280-021-01641-8 (DOI)000719717500001 ()34787831 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119203226 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20220613

Available from: 2022-06-13 Created: 2022-06-13 Last updated: 2023-11-09Bibliographically approved
Gröndahl, F. & Franzén, D. (2016). A Practical Approach to Integrating Research and Education: A Course Experiment from KTH, Sweden. In: Walter Leal Filho, Susan Nesbit (Ed.), New Developments in Engineering Education for Sustainable Development: (pp. 69-79). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Practical Approach to Integrating Research and Education: A Course Experiment from KTH, Sweden
2016 (English)In: New Developments in Engineering Education for Sustainable Development / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Susan Nesbit, Cham: Springer , 2016, p. 69-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study we evaluate a project-based learning course called Applied Ecology, within the master program Sustainable Technology at the Division of Industrial Ecology, at KTH—Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. The case study in the course is focused on the effects of a relatively large Bay, “Burgsviken”, situated on the island Gotland in the middle of the Baltic Sea, that has changed due to the eutrophication in the area. The eutrophication of the Bay has initiated bottom up processes of discussion and engagement among the stakeholders in the area, for the enhancement of the water quality and biological services of the bay, that would in turn improve fishing, swimming, biological diversity and tourism. There are several stakeholders involved in the project: a local non-profit organisation, farmers, entrepreneurs, authorities, permanent and seasonal inhabitants, researchers and others. The course is evaluated according to the methodology of Brundiers and Wiek (2013). Student evaluations have been conducted and analysed in relation to four phases: (1) Orienting phase, formulation of research question. (2) Framing phase, methodology and study planning. (3) Research phase, field study and other examinations. (4) Implementation phase, communication of the results with different stakeholders. The Applied Ecology course shares many of the positive features of other PPBL courses in the sustainability field—namely that it focuses on a real sustainability problem and that the student-centred learning approach and interactions between students and stakeholders make the student partnership in the project feel real, thus providing a practical insight of complex societal challenges. There are potential ways of improving all four phases of the course that were studied, but especially in the research phase and the implementation phase more efforts are needed. Feedback and reflections in the research phase could be improved by a clearer communication and to some extent changed pedagogical process through the course. All phases will be improved by increased communication before, during and after fieldwork between student, teachers and stakeholders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2016
Series
World Sustainability Series, ISSN 2199-7373, E-ISSN 2199-7381
Keywords
Applied ecology, Course evaluation, Engineering education, Project and problem-based learning, Sustainable development
National Category
Educational Sciences Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-262424 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-32933-8_7 (DOI)2-s2.0-85071491415 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-32932-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-32933-8 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20191024

Available from: 2019-10-24 Created: 2019-10-24 Last updated: 2022-06-26Bibliographically approved
Wu, J., Franzén, D. & Malmström, M. E. (2016). Anthropogenic phosphorus flows under different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden. Science of the Total Environment, 542, 1094-1105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthropogenic phosphorus flows under different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden
2016 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 542, p. 1094-1105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, concerns prevail about the unsustainable use of phosphorus and worldwide eutrophication, thus requiring efficient management of phosphorus flows. With increasing population and associated urban growth, urban management of phosphorus flows in the perspectives of recycling, eutrophication and total budget becomes increasingly important. This study mapped phosphorus flows for a reference year (2013) and a future year (2030) using different scenarios for the city of Stockholm, Sweden. The results indicated that the Swedish goal of recycling phosphorus from wastewater would cover the majority of the total phosphorus budget for Stockholm. However, in 2013, only 10% of phosphorus was recycled for agricultural use, around half of which was from sewage sludge and the other half from food waste. Almost 50% of total phosphorus was sent to landfill/mining waste capping with sewage sludge, for economic reasons and lack of market. Among the scenarios of upstream and downstream urban management options studied in combination with population growth, recovery of phosphorus from sewage sludge had the greatest potential to increase the fraction recycled to agriculture. However, only upstream measures, e.g. changed diet, were able to reduce the total phosphorus budget. Urban management of phosphorus flows based on the different perspectives of recycling, eutrophication or total budget was shown to potentially result in different preferred management actions and both upstream and downstream measures need to be considered. Moreover, management needs to pay attention to small but environmentally sensitive flows, particularly when setting city goals on phosphorus recycling by percentage in a large budget.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Phosphorus flow analysis, Scenarios, Phosphorus recycling, Total budget, Eutrophication
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-179256 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.09.024 (DOI)000365602300010 ()26442719 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84949320333 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160105

Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Wu, J., Franzén, D. & Malmström, M. E. (2016). Nutrient flows following changes in source strengths, land use and climate in an urban catchment, Råcksta Träsk in Stockholm, Sweden. Ecological Modelling, 338, 69-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutrient flows following changes in source strengths, land use and climate in an urban catchment, Råcksta Träsk in Stockholm, Sweden
2016 (English)In: Ecological Modelling, ISSN 0304-3800, E-ISSN 1872-7026, Vol. 338, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Managing nutrient flows to urban lakes is one of the main challenges to environmental sustainability in cities. Considering that future urban and climate changes may increase the challenge of handling future eutrophication, prediction of future nutrient loadings to aquatic environments in urban catchments has become increasingly important. Based on a new, innovative, structured Substance Flow Analysis (SFA) approach, where a source model was coupled to a Generalised Watershed Loading Functions (GWLF) model, this study investigated nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) delivery from sources to a water recipient for an urban catchment, using the case of Racksta Trask in Stockholm, Sweden, as an example. Potential effects from future changes in atmospheric deposition, vehicle volume and land use and from climate change (temperature and precipitation) were examined by comparing model scenarios in two periods (2000-2009 and 2050-2059). Model results suggested that climate change may have a greater impact on nitrogen loading to Racksta Trask lake than increasing vehicle volume and land use change. In addition, the results suggested that nitrogen loading to the lake may increase taking into account all changes examined, despite the expected decrease in background atmospheric deposition of nitrogen. In contrast, a marginal impact was found for phosphorus loading to the lake under all scenarios examined, resulting in only a slight increase in the combined scenario. From a nutrient pathways perspective, the results suggested that major pathways of nutrient loadings to the lake may not be much affected under most future scenarios examined, although groundwater was found to be a potentially sensitive pathway of nitrogen transport in the climate scenario. The model results provided important information for managers who need to plan for future nutrient handling in urban catchments, and the coupled SFA-GWLF model was suggested to be worthy of further testing at other sites and conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Climate change, Nutrient loadings, Stockholm, Substance flow analysis, Urban catchments, Urban change
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-186244 (URN)10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2016.08.001 (DOI)000383819200007 ()2-s2.0-84982847750 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20161018

Available from: 2016-05-07 Created: 2016-05-07 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Nathaniel, H., Gustafsson, J. P., Franzén, D. & Gröndahl, F.Cd accumulation in soil from beachcast application: A long-term prediction of its reintroduction for bio-fertilisation in Gotland, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cd accumulation in soil from beachcast application: A long-term prediction of its reintroduction for bio-fertilisation in Gotland, Sweden
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The ecological consequences of using beachcast compost as an agricultural resource input merit study. Using beachcast compost as a biofertiliser has multiple positive effects on agroecosystems, while also serving to remedy the negative effects on marine ecosystems caused by excessive beachcast production due to eutrophication. This process thus presents an opportunity to contribute to circular nutrient management and the development of sustainable agricultural, but it may also result in accumulation Cd (Cd) in the soil. In Gotland, Sweden, an example of cross-scale interaction between marine and agricultural domains has emerged from a national policy subsidising beachcast harvesting, which may help reintroduce the historical tradition of using beachcast in agriculture. To estimate potential risks, a field experiment and Cd mass balance were conducted to predict the rate of Cd accumulation, changes in soil Cd fractions, and potential beachcast application methods that avoid Cd soil accumulation. In the scenario where the maximum Cd input from beachcast compost is set to the same threshold as the level established for sewage sludge—0.75 g ha–1 year–1—beachcast compost with a Cd content of 1.5 mg kg–1 dw (the EU threshold for biofertilisers) could be applied in an amount of approximately 2000 kg ha–1 per year (one-tenth of the amount applied in this study). Therefore, the long-term effects of Cd soil accumulation resulting from continuous application of beachcast as fertiliser on agroecosystems cannot be disregarded and are of global relevance. 

 

Keywords
beachcast, biofertiliser, soil, cadmium, accumulation modelling
National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339416 (URN)
Note

QC 20231110

Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Nathaniel, H., Franzén, D. & Gröndahl, F.Regional variations in the chemical composition of fresh and composted beachcast on the island of Gotland, Sweden – considering future treatments.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional variations in the chemical composition of fresh and composted beachcast on the island of Gotland, Sweden – considering future treatments
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Harvesting beachcast from coastal zones to use the biomass in agriculture or horticulture could mitigate eutrophication while contributing to resource substitution of fossil-based inputs in food production. As such, beachcast holds great resource potential in a bio-based circular economy, but its chemical properties prove challenging, and more research is required to develop treatment techniques that will allow the realisation of such a system. We compiled results from chemical analyses of fresh beachcast from a database within the marine policy scheme, LOVA, in Gotland, Sweden, to study local and seasonal variations in macronutrients, C:N ratio, and Cd content. This data complemented with analyses of fresh and composted beachcast (passive pile treatment), for which the contents of macronutrient, ammonium, nitrate, and Cd, were measured, calculating C:N ratios and maturity indices (NH4+-N/NO3—N). The results confirm that regional variations in the above-mentioned properties require investments in treatment techniques and strategies to make beachcast usable. 

Keywords
beachcast, chemical composition, treatment, waste-to-resource conversion, sustainable resource management
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-339417 (URN)
Note

QC 20231110

Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6430-8993

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