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Jing, J., Dahlberg, L., Canter, D. & Plater-Zyberk, E. (2024). The Role of Third Place concerning Loneliness in the Context of Ageing in Place: Three Neighbourhoods in Stockholm. Health & Social Care in the Community, 2024, Article ID 4172682.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Third Place concerning Loneliness in the Context of Ageing in Place: Three Neighbourhoods in Stockholm
2024 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 2024, article id 4172682Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is an increasing recognition of the impact of built environment in the neighbourhood on healthy ageing, especially in the context of ageing in place. This study examines perceptions of third place and its potential value for mitigating loneliness in older adults. Thirty participants aged 65-89, living in ordinary housing across three neighbourhoods in the city of Stockholm, Sweden, conducted the interview-based sorting procedures, namely, Multiple Sorting Tasks (MST). In each individual MST procedure, the participant was asked to sort twenty pictures into groups using his or her own categories. The data were analysed using Multidimensional Scalogram Analysis, integrating qualitative data input and quantitative statistical analysis of the categorisations. Accessible local third places, which facilitate physical activities (especially walking) and community building (meaningful social connections) and provide options for food (a medium for social interactions), were seen as vital resources to combat loneliness. Thus, these places are supportive built environment elements of healthy ageing and ageing in place. The management aspect in third places operated by municipalities, including designing diverse public programs and services, and the service mentality of the staff members play an important role in making these places feel safe, at home, and potentially lessen the experience of loneliness to some extent. This study adds an urban design and planning perspective that can be integrated into environmental approaches to combat loneliness among older adults living in the community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Limited, 2024
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-345746 (URN)10.1155/2024/4172682 (DOI)001197963400001 ()2-s2.0-85189980512 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240419

Available from: 2024-04-18 Created: 2024-04-18 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Jing, J. & Canter, D. (2023). Developing a mixed-methods digital Multiple Sorting Task procedure using Zoom and Miro. Methodological Innovations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing a mixed-methods digital Multiple Sorting Task procedure using Zoom and Miro
2023 (English)In: Methodological Innovations, ISSN 2059-7991Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the Multiple Sorting Task (MST) participants sort entities into their self-defined categories. The descriptions they provide of their categories provide qualitative data. Multi-dimensional scaling of sorting generates quantitative results. Relating the qualitative descriptions to the quantitative output creates integrated mixed methods. As part of the study of conceptions of public space an online MST was developed using Zoom and Miro, supported by Email and Smartphone where necessary. Twenty adult participants performed the MST with 20 pictures of public spaces in Stockholm. Results demonstrate the viability of the novel digital MST. The MST’s benefits, challenges, and applications in its digital form as an integrated mixed-methods are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Picture sorting, multiple sorting tasks, digital sorting, photo elicitation, public space
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Urban and Regional Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326948 (URN)10.1177/20597991231181016 (DOI)
Projects
A part of the doctoral thesis
Note

QC 20230707

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-07-07Bibliographically approved
Jing, J. (2023). See and Be Seen: An Inquiry into the Role of Public Space in Combating Loneliness. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>See and Be Seen: An Inquiry into the Role of Public Space in Combating Loneliness
2023 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Se och bli sedd : En undersökning av det offentiliga rummets roll i att bekämpa ensamhet
Abstract [en]

Loneliness in cities has been an issue of great concern in public discourse, particularly during and in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. The detrimental impact of loneliness on health and well-being is well documented and has recently become a rising priority for governments worldwide. Recent literature on the impact of the built environment on loneliness has primarily focused on aspects related to neighborhood and mobility. This thesis makes a novel contribution to the understanding of how to mitigate loneliness in cities by focusing on public space. Urban design and planning play a role in shaping inclusive and accessible public spaces, which promote social interactions in various forms needed to tackle loneliness.

This thesis aims to inform how urban design and planning strategies can potentially impact levels of loneliness experienced in cities. It presents five articles that provide new insights, methods and theoretical frameworks for urban design and planning to tackle loneliness. The cover essay synthesizes key learnings, potential applications of findings, and next steps to advance the research agenda to address urban loneliness.

Case studies at the neighborhood and city levels were performed to explore both direct and indirect linkages between loneliness and public space. The empirical work carried out in the City of Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich underscores the spatial dimension of care practice in the everyday life of older adults. Several key common findings have emerged across the case studies. First, public space is an environmental resource that holds the potential to mitigate loneliness in all settings, but its management must be aligned with the local specificness and cultural context. This understanding also suggests that reduced access to desired public spaces may contribute to heightened loneliness. Second, the design, management, and use of public space affect the objective quality of public space and influence its perceived quality. Planning must therefore consider the complexity of how people perceive public space, including their responses to the physical, action, and cognitive facets of place. Third, this study reveals some useful key constructs, such as nature, walking, physical activities, seeing/meeting people, commercial, and ambivalence, which are the underlying components associated with place that can be relevant to the desirability of spending time in a place for those experiencing loneliness.

The Stockholm case studies highlight that easily accessible local third places can support feelings of independence and safety, and facilitate social and physical activities for community building (meaningful social connection). As such, these are found to be positive resources for combating loneliness among older adults. Familiarity, and related constructs, such as homeness and neighborhood attachment, are also significant for both young and older adults when they consider places to go during times of feeling lonely. Urban design and planning can help transform neighborhood streetscapes to serve as social infrastructure, delivering higher social and well-being values for all.

Collectively, these findings offer nuanced insights to improve the understanding of loneliness from an environmental approach. Urban policymaking, investment, design, planning, and development should consider public space as a promising pathway to combat loneliness. Place-based intervention strategies focused on enabling thriving public spaces will be critical for urban areas to reduce loneliness worldwide.

Abstract [sv]

Ensamheten i städer har blivit en viktig fråga i samhällsdebatten, särskilt i efterdyningarna av covid-19. De skadliga effekter ensamhet har på hälsa och välbefinnande är väl dokumenterade och har nyligen börjat ges allt högre prioritet av regeringar världen över. Senare forskning om den byggda miljöns inverkan på ensamhet har främst tittat på den byggda miljöns påverkan på ensamhet genom aspekter relaterade till grannskap (lokalsamhället) och framkomlighet. Denna avhandling bidrar med nya aspekter kring kunskapen om hur man kan minska ensamhet i städer genom att fokusera på det offentliga rummet (staden mellan rummen). Urban design och stadsplanering är betydelsefullt vid utformning av inkluderande och lättillgängliga offentliga rum, vilket främjar olika former av den sociala interaktion som behövs för att bekämpa ensamhet utifrån ett helhetsperspektiv.  

Syftet med den här avhandlingen är att ge information om hur urbana design- och stadsplaneringsstrategier potentiellt kan påverka de upplevda nivåerna av ensamhet i städer. Den innehåller fem separata artiklar som bidrar med nya empiriska insikter, metoder och teoriutveckling, för att bekämpa ensamhet utifrån urban design och planering. Kappan kompletterar artikelsamlingen med en sammanställning av viktiga lärdomar, slutsatser och rekommendationer samt en framtida forskningsagenda avseende den byggda miljöns påverkan på ensamhet. 

Med det inbördes sambandet mellan människa och miljö som ramverk har jag i denna avhandling genomfört fallstudier på stads- och stadsdelsnivå (grannskap) för att undersöka både direkta och indirekta kopplingar mellan ensamhet och det offentliga rummet. Det empiriska arbete som har utförts i Stockholm, Wien och Zürich har markerat den rumsliga dimensionen av omsorgspraktik i äldre vuxnas vardag. Flera viktiga gemensamma fynd har framkommit i fallstudierna. För det första är det offentliga rummet en resurs med potential att minska ensamhet i alla miljöer. Förvaltningen av det offentliga rummet måste dock överensstämma med den lokala särarten och det kulturella sammanhanget genom design. Denna insikt tyder även på att minskad tillgänglighet till det önskade offentliga rummet kan bidra till att ensamheten ökar. För det andra påverkar det offentliga rummets design, förvaltning och användning både den objektiva kvaliteten på det offentliga rummet och den uppfattade kvaliteten. Vid stadsplaneringen måste man därför ta hänsyn till komplexiteten och subjektiviteten i människors uppfattningar om det offentliga rummet, vilket inbegriper deras reaktioner på platsens fysiska, aktiviteter och kognitiva aspekter. För det tredje tydliggör en uppsättning kritiska begrepp vilka underliggande komponenter förknippade med platser som kan påverka hur önskvärt det är för de som upplever ensamhet att vistas på en viss plats. Det kan vara begrepp som natur, promenera, aktiviteter, träffa/möta människor, shopping och ambivalent känslor.  

Fallstudierna från Stockholm visar att lättillgängliga lokala tredjeplatser kan stödja självständighet och säkerhet, och främja fysiska och sociala aktiviteter för gemenskapsbyggande (meningsfulla sociala kontakter). Dessa är positiva resurser för att bekämpa ensamhet bland äldre vuxna. Samhörighet, och begrepp relaterade till detta som hemkänsla och att känna samhörighet med grannskap, är också viktigt för både yngre och äldre vuxna när de känner ensamhet och överväger platser att vistas på. Urban design kan bidra till att transformera det offentliga rummet, till exempel gatorna i grannskap (lokalområden i stadsdelen), så att de fungerar som sociala infrastrukturer som utöver själva transportfunktionen även ger ett högt värde ur både socialt och hälsomässigt perspektiv för alla. 

Sammantaget tillhandahåller dessa slutsatser en nyansering som kan förbättra kunskapen om ensamhet ur ett miljöperspektiv. I den här avhandlingen argumenterar jag för att man i urban politik, investering, planering och utveckling bör se det offentliga rummet som en lovande väg för att bekämpa ensamhet. Platsbaserade interventionsstrategier med fokus på att möjliggöra attraktiva offentliga rum kommer att vara ytterst viktiga för att minska ensamhet världen över.    

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2023. p. 92
Series
TRITA-ABE-DLT ; 2327
Keywords
Loneliness, social isolation, public space, third place, social infrastructure, streetscapes, care, aging, age-friendly, theory of place, built environment, social interaction, sense of community, belonging, neighborhood attachment, sorting, mixed-methods, urban design, urban planning, intervention, Ensamhet, social isolering, offentliga rum, tredje plats, social infrastruktur, gatumiljöer, omsorg, åldrande, äldrevänlig, teori om plats, byggd miljö, umgås, känsla av gemenskap, tillhörighet, tillgivenhet mot grannskap, sortering, mixade metoder, urban design, stadsbyggnad och stadsplanering, bekämpa ensamhet
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Urban and Regional Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326951 (URN)978-91-8040-600-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2023-06-08, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, KTH Campus, https://kth-se.zoom.us/j/63196912013, Stockholm, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Axel and Margaret Ax:son Johnson Foundation, H71890
Note

QC 230516

Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-05-17Bibliographically approved
Jing, J. (2022). Seeing Streetscapes as Social Infrastructure: A Paradigmatic Case Study of Hornsbergs Strand, Stockholm. Urban Planning, 7(4), 510-522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seeing Streetscapes as Social Infrastructure: A Paradigmatic Case Study of Hornsbergs Strand, Stockholm
2022 (English)In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 510-522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban streets are an integral part of the public realm. Streets are commonly planned following normative design prin-ciples focused on the connectivity of road networks and urban morphology. Beyond their function as mobility infras-tructure, streetscapes' aesthetic, social, and cultural qualities also have an important impact on the experience of the overall urban environment and human well-being. This study explores how urban design and planning can facilitate the design, management, and use of streetscapes that consider their role as social infrastructure. A paradigmatic case study of Hornsbergs Strand in the City of Stockholm is performed, incorporating spatial and temporal aspects. The case study area is chosen because it is both an attractive and "overcrowded" public space frequently discussed in the Swedish media. Data sources for the study include reviews of public documents such as Stockholm's city planning strategies, local media reports, a report from a resident workgroup, as well as walk-through observations and semi-structured expert interviews. The results highlight the potential of urban design strategies to develop streetscapes as social infrastructure through both permanent design measures and temporary design interventions. The tendency of the change in people's perception and attitude toward the place over time illustrates that design interventions are a continual process. The implications for pub-lic policy, urban development and investment in social infrastructure employing place strategies and design interventions are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogitatio, 2022
Keywords
physical activities, place value, public space, social interaction, streetscape, Sweden, temporal design intervention, well-being
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-323414 (URN)10.17645/up.v7i4.5776 (DOI)000905291000012 ()2-s2.0-85146276050 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230201

Available from: 2023-02-01 Created: 2023-02-01 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Gabauer, A., Glaser, M., Christensen, L., Lehner, J., Jing, J. & Lundberg, S. (2021). Geographies of Aging: Hidden Dimensions of Care in Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich. In: Angelika Gabauer, Sabine Knierbein, Nir Cohen, Henrik Lebuhn, Kim Trogal, Tihomir Viderman, Tigran Haas (Ed.), Care and the City: (pp. 171-182). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geographies of Aging: Hidden Dimensions of Care in Stockholm, Vienna, and Zurich
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Care and the City / [ed] Angelika Gabauer, Sabine Knierbein, Nir Cohen, Henrik Lebuhn, Kim Trogal, Tihomir Viderman, Tigran Haas, Routledge, 2021, p. 171-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With a growing share of older people in cities, “aging in place“ has turned into a central element in cities’ planning and health policy on ageing. Researchers agree that beyond the private home, the urban environment plays a crucial role in self-determined living. This focus has been further promoted since the WHO launched the Global Age-Friendly Cities project. While the provision of care infrastructures such as nearby medical centres and care-services to enhance age-friendly cities are widely acknowledged as urban planning approaches, there is a lack of knowledge on the importance of neighborhood networks and informal settings of encounter in late life as everyday dimensions of care with and among older people. This dimension and the implementation in city planning are especially important when taking Agenda 2030 into account. The chapters reflect on a broader concept of care as a complex process that visualizes the interrelations of public and private life and involves affective and active agencies of practical and material consequence. For this, we ask what are the hidden dimensions of care at the intersection of public and private life that go beyond the formalized care services and facilities for older people. The aim of the article is to promote a novel approach to seeing relationships among the built environment, nature, and humans to illustrate the heterogeneous, multiple everyday care practices of older people in order to advance our understanding of what age-friendly cities require. 

The chapter reflects on a broader concept of care as a complex process that connects the interrelations of public and private life and involves affective and active agencies of practical and material consequences. For this, we ask what the “hidden” dimensions of care with its informal settings at the intersection of public and private life that goes beyond the formalized urban facilities for older people are. The aim of the article is to promote a novel approach to seeing relationships among built environment, nature, and humans to illustrate the multiple everyday care practices of older people in order to draw a critical concept of age-friendly cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
Keywords
care, care ethics, age-friendly city, ageing in place, third place, public space, neighbourhood, built environment
National Category
Social Sciences Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326934 (URN)10.4324/9781003031536-17 (DOI)2-s2.0-85136634750 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230516

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-05-16Bibliographically approved
Jing, J., Canter, D. & Haas, T. (2019). Conceptualizing Public Space Using a Multiple Sorting Task–Exploring the Links between Loneliness and Public Space. Urban Science, 3(4), 1-22, Article ID 107.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizing Public Space Using a Multiple Sorting Task–Exploring the Links between Loneliness and Public Space
2019 (English)In: Urban Science, ISSN 2413-8851, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 1-22, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tests the viability of multiple sorting tasks (MST) as a method to explore perceptions of public space and its potential for people that are vulnerable to loneliness. The procedure integrates qualitative and quantitative aspects and obviates the challenge of people articulating how they interact with their surroundings, especially being aware of what features of their environment are influencing them. Two samples, each with six participants of varying ages and backgrounds, viewed 20 photographs of public spaces in Stockholm. They sorted these into categories based upon the activities they anticipated would occur there. Within each sample, a multidimensional scaling procedure was used to reveal the underlying structure across the combination of the six responses. The results showed coherent structures with interesting variations between people. A set of general multi-purpose places are identified, with others being differentiated in terms of whether they were ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ and ‘open’ or ‘enclosed’. The study also found that people conceptualized public space differently when loneliness was the focus during the sorting process. An assemblage of public spaces relevant for loneliness is also illustrated. This demonstrates the utility of the MST and provides theoretical and practical implications for urban planning and design that addresses loneliness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
public space; multiple sorting task; loneliness; social interaction; theory of place; environmental probabilism; urban planning; urban design
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Architecture, Urban Design; Planning and Decision Analysis, Urban and Regional Studies; Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326927 (URN)10.3390/urbansci3040107 (DOI)000621639500007 ()2-s2.0-85150646913 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20230516

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-05-16Bibliographically approved
Jing, J. (2018). Micro Urban Renewal: Community Gardens in Shanghai (1ed.). In: Danenberg R.; Doumpa, V. & Karssenberg, H. (Ed.), The City at Eye Level for Kids: (pp. 185-188). Stipo
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Micro Urban Renewal: Community Gardens in Shanghai
2018 (English)In: The City at Eye Level for Kids / [ed] Danenberg R.; Doumpa, V. & Karssenberg, H., Stipo , 2018, 1, p. 185-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the rapid urbanization of Chinese cities, improving urban living quality is a shared priority of Chinese citizens and their government. For cities like Shanghai, its green area in the high-density central city area has seen near zero growth during the past years.(Liu, Yin, et. al 2017). Innovations across different sectors and professions are needed to build more sustainable and livable urban environments.. The two case studies following provide us a peek of how community gardens are used as a catalyst for public participation and community empowerment that benefit its local residents, including children, directly in the Chinese context. The analysis will take the perspective of orgware to illustrate the procedures and outcomes of building community garden. Although Chinese community gardens are fairly young, its implementation procedures and enforcement mechanisms differ from the western community garden developed earlier (Liu 2016). Child’s participation and the child-friendliness are highlighted in the practice of community garden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stipo, 2018 Edition: 1
Keywords
Community garden, intergenerational design, sustainability, high-density, child-friendly, Shanghai
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Architecture, Urban Design; Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-282940 (URN)978-91-7729-838-0 (ISBN)
Projects
Book chapter
Note

QC 20201012

Available from: 2020-10-02 Created: 2020-10-02 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Iqbal, A., Uittenborgaard, C. & Jing, J. (2018). Vem Äger City? Och Spelar Det Någon Roll?. In: Ann Pålsson (Ed.), Stockholm City: Stadskultur, demokrati och spekulation (pp. 205-211). Stockholm: Samfundet S:t Erik
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vem Äger City? Och Spelar Det Någon Roll?
2018 (Swedish)In: Stockholm City: Stadskultur, demokrati och spekulation / [ed] Ann Pålsson, Stockholm: Samfundet S:t Erik , 2018, p. 205-211Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Samfundet S:t Erik, 2018
Series
Samfundet S:t Eriks årsbok
National Category
Architecture
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-280474 (URN)978-91-7545-790-1 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20200909

Available from: 2020-09-09 Created: 2020-09-09 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Jing, J. & Haas, T. (2015). The Built Environment for Children: Stockholm Experience. In: : . Paper presented at 52nd International Making Cities Livable Conference on Achieving Green, Healthy Cities in Bristol, UK, June 29 – July 3, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Built Environment for Children: Stockholm Experience
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The enjoyment of, and impact on children from the built environment is a very significant aspect of “social sustainability”, but it is relatively underrepresented in the discourse on sustainable development. Despite significant advancements in the understanding of the relationship between the built environment and child health and development made over the past several decades, many argue that contemporary urban (and sub-urban) environments in developed countries are having negative repercussions on child health and development.

 

Stockholm, featuring both advancements as child-friendly city which reflects Sweden’s national branding as “child-friendly” nation (Swedish Institute, 2012) and challenges as to its radical urban transformation which in combination with a relative shortage of housing that places great pressure on city planning. The paper draws importance to the phenomenon of public space regeneration, with particular focus on understanding how public spaces can be built and adapted to provide children with environments that stimulate their social, educational and physical development. The high levels of activities to modify, expand, and build new areas in the city to accommodate more people, including more children, provides a dynamic and robust setting for case study.  This paper reviews the built environment for pre-school aged children (age 0-6) in the city of Stockholm and investigate how planners, architects and designers account for children as users of the spaces and places that they plan and design. A series of case studies on child-friendly design are provided in order to produce learning materials for architects, planners and policy makers based upon the Stockholm experience.

Keywords
Urban Design, Architecture, Cities, Children
National Category
Architecture Design
Research subject
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-165798 (URN)
Conference
52nd International Making Cities Livable Conference on Achieving Green, Healthy Cities in Bristol, UK, June 29 – July 3, 2015
Note

QC 20150504

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Jing, J., Dahlberg, L., Canter, D. & Plater-Zyberk, E. The Role of Third Place Concerning Loneliness in the  Context of Ageing in Place: Three Neighbourhoods in Stockholm Revisited.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Third Place Concerning Loneliness in the  Context of Ageing in Place: Three Neighbourhoods in Stockholm Revisited
(English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
public space; loneliness; wellbeing; ageing in place, age-friendly city; urban design
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-326944 (URN)
Note

QC 20230516

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-05-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2207-8143

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