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Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Ntostoglou, E., Ddiba, D. I., Khatiwada, D., Martin, V., Engström, R. E., Henrysson, M. & Lasaridi, K. (2024). Understanding the interactions between biowaste valorisation and the Sustainable Development Goals: insights from an early transition stage. International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development, 16(1), 53-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the interactions between biowaste valorisation and the Sustainable Development Goals: insights from an early transition stage
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2024 (English)In: International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development, ISSN 1946-3138, E-ISSN 1946-3146, ISSN 1946-3138, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 53-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The valorisation of urban biowaste can contribute to a circular and sustainable resource management. However, biowaste valorisation is not inherently sustainable. This study employs the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to investigate the sustainability implications of biowaste valorisation. A narrative literature review provided an overview of the current scientific knowledge on interactions between biowaste valorisation and selected SDG targets. Then stakeholder interviews yielded insights into such interactions in a national context. Our findings show the potential for 19 synergies and 11 trade-offs between biowaste valorisation and 20 selected SDG targets that are addressed in detail. Although the synergies outnumber the trade-offs, different context-dependencies influence the nature and strength of the interactions. We highlight three types of context-dependencies relating to governance. This study informs the scientific community and decision-makers on planning for sustainable biowaste valorisation that addresses context-dependencies. The insights can guide countries and cities at early transition stages towards biowaste valorisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2024
Keywords
biobased resource recovery and biorefinery, circular bioeconomy, organic fraction of municipal solid waste, SDG interactions, urban biowaste valorization
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-344543 (URN)10.1080/19463138.2024.2319795 (DOI)001185037800001 ()2-s2.0-85188118633 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20240325

Available from: 2024-03-20 Created: 2024-03-20 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Harahap, F., Mohammed, H., Henrysson, M., Franco, J. & Jenelius, E. (2023). Policy Tools for Electric Vehicle Adoption in Curitiba City. In: Proceedings of the International Conference “Sustainable Built Environment and Urban Transition”: . Paper presented at Sustainable Built Environment and Urban Transition, 12-13 October 2023, Växjö.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Policy Tools for Electric Vehicle Adoption in Curitiba City
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2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference “Sustainable Built Environment and Urban Transition”, 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The role of electric vehicles (EVs) in more sustainable cities is widely recognized, with their adoption increasing rapidly. Most governments have targets for continued EV adoption rate growth, and some plan to ban fossil-fuelled vehicles altogether. Yet, in most countries, including Brazil, the proportion of EVs among new vehicles sold remains low. EV adoption poses multiple technological, economic and social challenges that require targeted policy mechanisms. This study assesses policy measures to expedite EV adoption for road transport decarbonisation and sheds light on the critical role of EVs in sustainable urban development. We explore electric mobility challenges in urban areas, focusing on the case of Curitiba City in Brazil. We investigate existing challenges and barriers to policy implementation in Curitiba and successful interventions in cities worldwide to identify suitable policies for Curitiba. The study uses in-depth interviews with relevant stakeholders to examine policy tools, including financial, legal, knowledge-based, and societal instruments. The study recommends complementary instruments and measures to accelerate their adoption in Curitiba. Overall, the study's results, which identify criteria for policy design and implementation towards complete transport decarbonisation, should be valuable for decision-making in transport and mobility planning.

Keywords
electric vehicles, sustainable transport, urban policy, Curitiba
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-338083 (URN)
Conference
Sustainable Built Environment and Urban Transition, 12-13 October 2023, Växjö
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-04893
Note

Part of ISBN 978-91-8082-042-4

QC 20231016

Available from: 2023-10-13 Created: 2023-10-13 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved
Hendrickson, C. & Henrysson, M. (2023). Theories of Change and results-based management for the sustainable development agenda. In: Luca Simeone, David Drabble, Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen (Ed.), Strategic Thinking, Design and the Theory of Change: A Framework for Designing Impactful and Transformational Social Interventions (pp. 56-75). Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theories of Change and results-based management for the sustainable development agenda
2023 (English)In: Strategic Thinking, Design and the Theory of Change: A Framework for Designing Impactful and Transformational Social Interventions / [ed] Luca Simeone, David Drabble, Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2023, p. 56-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2023
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-334929 (URN)2-s2.0-85165670141 (Scopus ID)
Note

Part of ISBN 9781803927718, 9781803927701

QC 20230830

Available from: 2023-08-30 Created: 2023-08-30 Last updated: 2023-08-30Bibliographically approved
Vanhuyse, F., Rezaie, S., Englund, M., Jokiaho, J., Henrysson, M. & André, K. (2022). Including the social in the circular: A mapping of the consequences of a circular economy transition in the city of Umeå, Sweden. Journal of Cleaner Production, 380, Article ID 134893.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Including the social in the circular: A mapping of the consequences of a circular economy transition in the city of Umeå, Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 380, article id 134893Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The circular economy (CE) model, where resources are kept "in the loop" for as long as possible through a series of reusing, remanufacturing, recycling, and recovery strategies, has been acclaimed for reducing the environmental impacts of our current economic model substantially and has therefore been supported by a wide range of policymakers as one solution to tackling climate change. However, how circular transitions in cities impact people has been rarely researched, and even less attention has been paid to the negative consequences of CE transitions.

This paper presents the findings from a social impact assessment conducted in the city of Umeå, Sweden. We identified several negative impacts of a CE transition across seven social impact categories and explored three areas in depth with stakeholders in the city: employment, access to services and participation. We found that the negative impacts of the CE are perceived to be limited and that the CE interventions are mainly viewed as a win-win-win outcome, i.e., a win for the environment, the economy and people. This raises questions about the level to which societal consequences have been considered and whether all relevant stakeholders, in particular civil society, have participated in the design of the city's CE strategy. Our findings can inform other cities about possible negative consequences of CE transitions and provide insights into how to incorporate different stakeholders in the CE transition process to ensure that no one is left behind.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2022
Keywords
Circular economy, Urban transitions, Employment conditions, Participation, Intersectionality
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-320950 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2022.134893 (DOI)000883802400006 ()2-s2.0-85141278327 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Urban Circularity Assessment Framework
Funder
Vinnova, 2019–03237
Note

QC 20221206

Available from: 2022-11-03 Created: 2022-11-03 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Henrysson, M., Papageorgiou, A., Björklund, A., Vanhuyse, F. & Sinha, R. (2022). Monitoring progress towards a circular economy in urban areas: An application of the European Union circular economy monitoring framework in Umeå municipality. Sustainable cities and society, 87, 104245-104245, Article ID 104245.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring progress towards a circular economy in urban areas: An application of the European Union circular economy monitoring framework in Umeå municipality
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2022 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 87, p. 104245-104245, article id 104245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As cities worldwide implement strategies to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy (CE), there is an increasing need for tools to monitor progress. However, a standardised metric for CE monitoring in urban areas is lacking. This study examines the potential of the EU Circular Economy Monitoring Framework (CEMF), an established indicator-based framework for measuring national- and EU-level circularity performance, as a monitoring tool for urban areas. For this purpose, available data sources that can support the framework's application at the urban level are mapped, and data quality is assessed following the pedigree matrix approach. Next, the CEMF indicators are computed for the urban area of Umeå, Sweden. The mapping showed limited availability of urban-level data, necessitating the downscaling of national-level data using proxy factors. Most available urban-level data are of high quality, while the quality of national-level data is reduced when used to compute indicators at the urban level. The application of the CEMF in Umeå indicates that there are areas where the municipality performs well, though further improvements are needed. We conclude that the CEMF has potential as a monitoring tool for urban areas. However, improvements in CEMF...s scope and data availability are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Cities Circularity Indicators Resources Waste Sustainable urban transitions
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Engineering and Technologies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Environmental Strategic Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-320346 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2022.104245 (DOI)000876395200002 ()2-s2.0-85139840787 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019–03237
Note

QC 20221205

Available from: 2022-10-19 Created: 2022-10-19 Last updated: 2022-12-05Bibliographically approved
Vanhuyse, F., Haddaway, N. R. & Henrysson, M. (2021). Circular cities: an evidence map of research between 2010 and 2020. Discover Sustainability, 2(1), Article ID 50.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circular cities: an evidence map of research between 2010 and 2020
2021 (English)In: Discover Sustainability, E-ISSN 2662-9984, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Worldwide, cities are implementing circular economy (CE) strategies to reduce the resources they consume and their environmental impact. To understand the CE strategies and sectors cities have been focusing on, we have conducted an evidence map describing the literature published in the last ten years. The main outputs are a searchable database comprising 178 publications showing which cities have been discussed, what CE strategy they are focusing on, and the sectors under review. The results show that most research has focused on European countries. Those efforts mainly concentrate on waste and wastewater management, and recycling and recovery strategies are considered the “lower-level” strategies in the CE taxonomy. It highlights the potential for further research in other cities and regions, looking across sectors and analyzing strategies that tackle the “higher-level” CE strategies. Higher-level strategies include reducing, repurposing, remanufacturing and reusing opportunities to achieve the potential attributed to a CE model by governments across the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
General Medicine
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis; Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-304993 (URN)10.1007/s43621-021-00059-2 (DOI)000974774400001 ()2-s2.0-85124083414 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-03237Vinnova
Note

QC 20211122

Available from: 2021-11-18 Created: 2021-11-18 Last updated: 2023-09-21Bibliographically approved
Papageorgiou, A., Henrysson, M., Nuur, C., Sinha, R., Sundberg, C. & Vanhuyse, F. (2021). Mapping and assessing indicator-based frameworks for monitoring Circular Economy development at the city-level. Sustainable cities and society, 75, Article ID 103378.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping and assessing indicator-based frameworks for monitoring Circular Economy development at the city-level
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2021 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 75, article id 103378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The transition towards a circular economy (CE) is increasingly recognized as a promising pathway to tackle pressing sustainability challenges at the city-level. Indicator-based frameworks, that is, integrated systems of indicators, are considered as useful tools for monitoring this transition. Yet, studies that map and assess such frameworks are scanty. This article addresses this gap by assessing 15 indicator-based frameworks applicable to measure circularity at the city-level. The identified frameworks were assessed using eight criteria (transparency, stakeholder engagement, effective communication, ability to track temporal changes, applicability, alignment with CE principles, validity and relevance to sustainable development). Additionally, 12 validity requirements were defined to assess to what extent the indicators in the frameworks reflect CE aspects. The assessment reveals a wide variation regarding the extent to which the frameworks match the criteria with none of them satisfying all. In addition, in terms of validity criterion, none includes indicators that fulfill all the validity requirements. Furthermore, most frameworks consist mainly of environmental indicators and only three include indicators reflecting aspects related to the four pillars of sustainable development (environmental, social, economic and governance). Further research could develop a standardized framework for measuring circularity at the city-level and improving existing frameworks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2021
Keywords
Circular cities, Circularity, Indicators, indicators, Metrics, Monitoring and evaluation, Sustainable urban development
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-302983 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2021.103378 (DOI)000728571100006 ()2-s2.0-85116134733 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-03237
Note

QC 20211213

Available from: 2021-10-03 Created: 2021-10-03 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
Henrysson, M. & Hendrickson, C. (2021). Scope for Circular Economy Model in Urban Agri-Food Value Chains (1ed.). In: Ranjula Bali Swain and Susanne Sweet (Ed.), Sustainable Consumption and Production, Volume II: Circular Economy and Beyond (pp. 75-97). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scope for Circular Economy Model in Urban Agri-Food Value Chains
2021 (English)In: Sustainable Consumption and Production, Volume II: Circular Economy and Beyond / [ed] Ranjula Bali Swain and Susanne Sweet, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1, p. 75-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we discuss why in food waste and loss and energy debate community-led initiatives and alternative economies deserve to be looked at more seriously when considering support to circular economy approaches, modelling, and adaptation in the urban context. We focus on the emergence of two types of community-led initiatives in the energy and agri-food sectors. We draw parallels between their role in bringing variety to experimentation when applying circular economy principles in practice. To better understand the potential of combining alternative urban agri-food networks with community-led energy initiatives in sustainable transformation of urban production and consumption systems, it is important to recognize that the uptake of visions or strategies of circularity is affected by the availability and strength of social networks, driving forces behind their emergence and persistence, and technological solutions within and for these grassroots initiatives. We recognize three conditions to building resilient sustainable urban food networks: understanding of multiple urban flows from a coupled systems-perspective, the diversification of knowledge, and overcoming structural and cultural resistance to change. Different framings, such as in narrow terms of innovations focused on technological optimisation, can slow down recognition and reaping benefits from interdependencies of food and energy infrastructures, networks, and institutions. We argue that there is a need for better understanding of how can measures directed at minimizing food waste and loss and wider uptake of sustainable energy systems be coupled and complementary in a more circular urban economy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021 Edition: 1
Keywords
Urban circularity Community-led sustainable energy transition Food waste and loss Sector coupling
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-285924 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-55285-5_5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85111452425 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20201117

Available from: 2020-11-13 Created: 2020-11-13 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Vanhuyse, F., Fejzić, E., Ddiba, D. I. & Henrysson, M. (2021). The lack of social impact considerations in transitioning towards urban circular economies: a scoping review. Sustainable cities and society, 103394-103394, Article ID 103394.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lack of social impact considerations in transitioning towards urban circular economies: a scoping review
2021 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, p. 103394-103394, article id 103394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Worldwide, cities are implementing circular economy (CE) strategies to reduce the resources they consume and their environmental impact. However, the evidence of the intended and unintended social consequences of the transition to “circular cities” is scattered. The lack of a coherent overview of the evidence on the subject can hinder effective decision-making in policy and practice. This study examines the extent to which the current literature addresses the social impacts that a transition to a CE produces in cities. We used a methodological approach related to systematic mapping to collate the evidence published over the past decade globally. The study finds that social impacts have rarely been considered in studies of circular cities, and where they have been discussed, the scope has been quite limited, only covering employment (mostly of informal sector workers) and governance practices. This scoping review highlights the need to further analyse and integrate social impact considerations into decision-making connected to transitions towards circular cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV, 2021
Keywords
Transportation, Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment, Civil and Structural Engineering, Geography, Planning and Development
National Category
Social Sciences Economic Geography Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-303087 (URN)10.1016/j.scs.2021.103394 (DOI)000730253000007 ()2-s2.0-85116070305 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-03237
Note

QC 20211101

Available from: 2021-10-05 Created: 2021-10-05 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Henrysson, M. & Nuur, C. (2021). The Role of Institutions in Creating Circular Economy Pathways for Regional Development. Journal of Environment and Development (2), 127-148, Article ID 107049652199187.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Institutions in Creating Circular Economy Pathways for Regional Development
2021 (English)In: Journal of Environment and Development, ISSN 1070-4965, E-ISSN 1552-5465, no 2, p. 127-148, article id 107049652199187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the past decade, the circular economy has gained attention as a mechanism of transition toward a regenerative, low carbon, and resource-efficient society. As the history of previous radical transformations shows, successful transition toward the circular economy cannot take place without understanding the institutional features of industrial transformations. This article highlights the significance of institutions by placing the circular economy model in the context of the natural resource–based sector and discusses the importance of institutions in regional path development. The article identifies three institutional determinants of both endogenous and directed transformation toward the circular economy model in the regional context: (i) proximity of physical flows and assets, (ii) maturation and diversity of market networks, and (iii) inherent values and patterns of cooperation. This article offers a starting point for future studies of circular economy transitions and the role of institutions as en- abling, as well as at times obstructing transition environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications, 2021
Keywords
circular economy transition, institutions, natural resource–based sector, regional path development
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-291805 (URN)10.1177/1070496521991876 (DOI)000630795900001 ()2-s2.0-85102730452 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20210802

Available from: 2021-03-19 Created: 2021-03-19 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0253-3380

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