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On using the thin fluid-layer approach at ultrasonic frequencies for characterising grout propagation in an artificial fracture
(Uppsala University, Dep. of Earth Sciences, Geophysics)
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5394-3868
(Uppsala University, Dep. of Earth Sciences, Geophysics)
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Rock Mechanics And Mining Sciences, ISSN 1365-1609, E-ISSN 1873-4545, Vol. 89, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigate the ultrasonic transport properties of such an idealised fracture whose 100 µm aperture is about 0.02 the wavelength, and filled with various fluids flowing under external forcing. As the artificial fracture is made of two solid and parallel walls separated by a thin fluid layer, we use the thin fluid layer concept to study the compressional (P-) wavefield transmitted across and reflected off the fracture, with no mode-conversion considered. We demonstrate that air and various fluids (water, grouts of varied w/c – water to cement ratio) can be distinguished when injected into the fracture, both at atmospheric pressure or under over-pressure as done in real grouting cases in the field. Then, using an analytical solution, we verify our experimental data and predict the results that can be obtained with a different fracture aperture. Our results illustrate that replicating such ultrasonic measurements both in space and time would allow successfully monitoring the grout propagation within an artificial fracture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 89, p. 68-74
Keywords [en]
Fracture, Grout, Monitoring, Reflection, Thin fluid layer, Ultrasonic, w/c ratio, Air, Atmospheric pressure, Grouting, Mortar, Ultrasonics, Artificial fracture, External forcing, Fracture apertures, Mode conversions, Thin fluids, Ultrasonic frequency, Water to cement (binder) ratios, Transport properties
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Geotechnical Engineering
Research subject
Civil and Architectural Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-195214DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2016.07.010ISI: 000387519300007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84984817998OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-195214DiVA, id: diva2:1047466
Funder
Rock Engineering Research Foundation (BeFo)Swedish Transport AdministrationSBUF - Sveriges Byggindustriers Utvecklingsfond
Note

QC 20161117

Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved

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Nejad Ghafar, AliDraganovic, AlmirLarsson, Stefan

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Soil and Rock Mechanics
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International Journal of Rock Mechanics And Mining Sciences
Earth and Related Environmental SciencesGeotechnical Engineering

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