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Characterization of an organic Rankine cycle system for waste heat recovery from heavy-duty engine coolant and exhaust
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. (Low temperature waste heat recovery)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6999-3969
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1033-9601
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

To meet the strict legislations imposed on carbon-dioxide emissions, organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery (WHR) technology is being extensively studied and applied in long haulage heavyduty (HD) truck engines. The focus of this paper isto characterize an ORC system of a HD long-haulage commercial truck engine that uses single and dual heat sources for WHR. The main objective of this work is to estimate the improvement in the system’s performance when the number of heat sources is increased. Two different WHR configurations: (i) integrated with the engine exhaust and (ii) integrated with both the engine coolant and the exhaust, are studied using the 1D simulation tool GT-Suite. Two types of scroll expanders, adopted from literature, are used in the ORC system configurations to analyze and compare their effect on the overall performance of the engine. Performance of the scroll expanders are generated from their semi-empirical models and R1233zD is used as the working fluid. With engine exhaust as the only heat source, both the expanders exhibit similar performance potentials at their optimum speeds. With two heat sources, fuel-saving is considerably improved, provided the coolant temperature is increased to 120°C and above. For the chosen conditions, expander A, at its optimum coolant temperature of 150oC, leads to around 5.7% fuel-saving; whereas, expander B, at its optimum coolant temperature of 130oC, leads to 5.5% fuel-saving. Further, this paper discusses the effect of expander speeds, expander volumes and superheating on the overall system efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. article id 159
Keywords [en]
Organic Rankine cycle, waste heat recovery, heavy-duty, volumetric expanders
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Machine Design; Machine Design; Machine Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-262825OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-262825DiVA, id: diva2:1362651
Conference
5th International symposium on ORC power systems, 9 – 11 September 2019, Athens
Projects
Low temperature waste heat recovery
Note

QC 20191024

Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-24Bibliographically approved

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Thantla, SandhyaFridh, JensChristiansen Erlandsson, Anders

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