kth.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
3D printable composites of modified cellulose fibers and conductive polymers and their use in wearable electronics
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9113-8413
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
Karolinska Inst, Med Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6167-6432
Show others and affiliations
2023 (English)In: APPLIED MATERIALS TODAY, ISSN 2352-9407, Vol. 30, article id 101703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are many bioelectronic applications where the additive manufacturing of conductive polymers may be of use. This method is cheap, versatile and allows fine control over the design of wearable electronic devices. Nanocellulose has been widely used as a rheology modifier in bio-based inks that are used to print electrical components and devices. However, the preparation of nanocellulose is energy and time consuming. In this work an easy-to-prepare, 3D-printable, conductive bio-ink; based on modified cellulose fibers and poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), is presented. The ink shows excellent printability, the printed samples are wet stable and show excellent electrical and electrochemical performance. The printed structures have a conductivity of 30 S/cm, high tensile strains (>40%), and specific capacitances of 211 F/g; even though the PEDOT:PSS only accounts for 40 wt% of the total ink composition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and Raman spectroscopy data show that the modified cellulose fibers induce conformational changes and phase separation in PEDOT:PSS. It is also demonstrated that wearable supercapacitors and biopotential-monitoring devices can be prepared using this ink.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV , 2023. Vol. 30, article id 101703
Keywords [en]
Dialcohol-modified cellulose fibers, 3D printing, Conducting polymer, PEDOT:PSS, Bioelectronics
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-323583DOI: 10.1016/j.apmt.2022.101703ISI: 000912019800001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85143488124OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-323583DiVA, id: diva2:1735304
Note

QC 20230208

Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2023-02-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Jain, KarishmaWang, ZhenEngel, EmileCiftci, Göksu CinarFager, CeciliaLarsson, Per A.Wågberg, Lars

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jain, KarishmaWang, ZhenEngel, EmileCiftci, Göksu CinarFager, CeciliaLarsson, Per A.Wågberg, Lars
By organisation
Fibre TechnologyFibre- and Polymer TechnologyWallenberg Wood Science Center
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric MaterialsMaterials Chemistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 214 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf