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Airborne Wear Particles Generated from Conductor Rail and Collector Shoe Contact: Influence of Sliding Velocity and Particle Size
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1291-8778
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2145-3650
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2489-0688
2016 (English)In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 64, no 3, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mechanical wear of train components is one of the main sources of airborne particles in subway air. A certain contribution is suspected to derive from third-rail systems due to the sliding of two metallic surfaces between conductor rail and collector shoe during operation. In this study, a pin-on-disc apparatus was used to simulate the friction between such two sliding partners (shoe-to-rail). Airborne particles generated from the sliding contact were measured by particle counters (a fast mobility particle sizer spectrometer and an optical particle sizer) and were collected by an electrical low-pressure impactor for physical and chemical analysis. Interface temperature for each test was measured by a thermocouple. The influence of sliding velocity and temperature on particulate number concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition was investigated. Atomic absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy measurements were carried out to determine the chemical compositions. Results show that increasing sliding velocity results in a higher temperature at the frictional interface and a higher concentration of ultrafine particles. The ratio of manganese to iron surface oxides increased strongly with smaller particle size. A copper compound was observed in some particle samples, probably gerhardite (Cu2NO3(OH)(3)) formed due to high temperature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2016. Vol. 64, no 3, article id 40
Keywords [en]
Sliding wear, Third-rail tribology, Particle emissions, Airborne wear particle, Oxidative wear
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-199514DOI: 10.1007/s11249-016-0775-7ISI: 000389604800008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84993992738OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-199514DiVA, id: diva2:1066024
Note

QC 20170117

Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Hedberg, YolandaOlofsson, Ulf

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