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Making Magic Machines
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2639-2175
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

How can we design experiences that explore ideas and notions of the unknown? The aim of the work outlined here is to create short, intense, workshop-like experiences that generate strong commitments, and expose underlying personal desires as drivers for new ideas. I would like to propose a material practice, which uses open-ended making to engage in the imagination of new things. Informed by a concern or a longing, this exploration employs familiar yet mundane materials - such as candy and cardboard - through which several planes collide: the possible, the unknown, the feared and the desired. The process is aimed at allowing a broad range of knowledge to materialise - through ways that are less normative, and less constrained by commercial and technological concerns, and to emerge instead as far-fetched ideas that offer a kind of knowledge, which belongs to no one. The format has evolved over time, from relatively elaborate workshops for technology prototyping, towards the point where they are now focussed on the making of work that is about technology, rather than of technology.

Abstract [sv]

Hur kan vi iscensätta upplevelser som tillåter oss att utforska och skapa idéer för det som vi ännu inte vet något om? Genom att engagera deltagare i korta, intensiva, workshop-liknande upplevelser har jag lyckats få dem att öppna sig, uttrycka personliga drivkrafter och önskemål, vilket i sin tur gör det möjligt för dem att skapa helt nya designkoncept. Mitt bidrag är en ny materiell praktik där skapande-processen görs öppen och därmed låter deltagarna fantisera fram helt nya möjliga saker. Praktiken är grundad i deltagarnas djupt kända personliga drivkrafter och önskemål, men vi ber dem uttrycka dem i prosaiska fysiska material - såsom godis eller kartong - där motsatsförhållandet mellan dessa båda leder till att olika synsätt kan komma till ytan och ställas mot varandra: det möjliga, det okända, det fruktade och det önskade. Praktiken öppnar för att ge ett brett spektrum av kunskap fysisk form - och då vi gör det på ett icke-normativt sätt, där vi undviker att begränsas av kommersiella eller tekniska förutsättningar, skapar vi en grund för att få fram idéer bortom de självklara - idéer som egentligen inte tillhör någon av oss och samtidigt alla. Formatet har utvecklats över en lång tidsrymd, från workshops där vi skapade prototyper i tekniska material, till den form de har idag som fokuserar på att uttrycka idéer om teknik snarare än i teknik.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. , p. 129
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214017ISBN: 978-91-7729-508-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-214017DiVA, id: diva2:1139682
Public defence
2017-10-06, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, Stockholm, 14:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20170911

Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Circles and props: making unknown technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circles and props: making unknown technology
2012 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 60-65Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The OWL Circles are hosted in a neutral, utilitarian space containing a large, shared worktable with a selection of tools and various neatly organized recycled materials. The Circle workshop experience takes the participant through a rapid series of formalized conceptual shifts, each drawing on work in theater and performance theory, game play, psychology, and other areas. The introduction functions as the drawing of a circle or the beginning of a game, and as such it serves a number of roles. In a theatrical sense it declares that a game is beginning. The switch between an abstract desire, defined very strictly by someone else and the feeling that this word does indeed reside within your body, allows the participants to begin to work. As a postscript to the overall workshop experience, each participant is debriefed before leaving the workshop space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: ACM Press, 2012
National Category
Computer Sciences
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-213996 (URN)10.1145/2168931.2168944 (DOI)2-s2.0-84860515614 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170913

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
2. Making Magic Machines
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making Magic Machines
2013 (English)In: 10th European Academy of Design Conference  - Crafting the Future, Gothenburg, Sweden, 17 – 19 April 2013: Crafting the Future, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is becoming increasingly common to include design methodology into innovation processes, but this is still mostly done to problem-solve or user-test technologies that are already at a late stage of innovation. This paper describes an attempt to use a fine art sculptural process to access unspoken desires and fears of the new and unknown: an exploratory children's workshops aimed at uncovering new technological objects and needs using craft and embodied making. The workshop uses the notion of magic and machine as substitute for technology to allow a broader range of response. We ask questions like: How do we design magic? What is magical to you? If you could make anything at all, what would it be? The responses are low-fi objects built from paper, cardboard, wood, string and plastic. These objects are in turn treated as props in a process of enacting a future scenario-of-use. The paper describes the process itself as well as a small selection of the resulting objects and suggests some tentative guidelines for using this type of workshop format.

Keywords
Machine, magic, children, innovation
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214008 (URN)
Conference
10th European Academy of Design Conference
Note

QC 20170913

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
3. The deliberate cargo cult
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The deliberate cargo cult
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems (DIS '14), New York, USA: ACM Press, 2014, p. 627-636Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Taking it’s origin from the notion of the cargo cult as anelaborate misunderstanding, this paper suggests a series ofexploratory design methods to support users in generatingrequirements and scenarios-of-use for technological objectsthat do not yet exist. Strategies from fields such as art andperformance are used to create experiences of userinvolvementcentered on the making of non-functionalmock-ups. These can then act as props through which theparticipant can express their intuitions and concerns with agiven technological notion. The processes described makesuse of a broad range of cultural drivers to engage users inplayful misunderstandings that facilitate new, out of theordinary, interpretations of objects. The paper outlines thebasis of three projects, discusses the drivers behind eachproject and suggests guidelines for creating these kinds ofexploratory embodied experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: ACM Press, 2014
Keywords
Future technology; magic; prototyping; cargo cult; experience
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214010 (URN)10.1145/2598510.2598596 (DOI)2-s2.0-84904512067 (Scopus ID)
Conference
DIS
Note

QC 20170913

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
4. The Instrument as the Source of New in New Music
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Instrument as the Source of New in New Music
2017 (English)In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 37-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How can we treat technological matter as yet another material from which our notions of possible future instruments can be constructed, intrinsically intertwined with, and informed by a practice of performance? We strive to develop musical-performance instruments not only by creating technology, but also in developing them as aesthetic and cultural objects. A musical instrument is not an interface and should not be designed as such; instead, new instruments are the source of new in new music. Like any traditional instrument, a new instrument's potential for producing quality musical sound can only be revealed when it is played. We present an instrument-design process conducted by a visionary and an agenda-setting musician. The resulting objects are experimental prototypes of technological matter, which allow analysis and meaning to be specified through physical and tactile interaction with the objects themselves. As the instruments evolve through various stages, their capability is continually enhanced, making them all the more desirable for musicians to play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2017
Keywords
instrument, embodied, making, improvisation, performance, prototype
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214011 (URN)10.1162/DESI_a_00450 (DOI)000404998600005 ()2-s2.0-85022094590 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20170913

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
5. The Dial: Exploring Computational Strangeness
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Dial: Exploring Computational Strangeness
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA '16), New York, USA: ACM Press, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the process of a computational ideaemerging from a process of user engagement: algorithmicrecommendations as artistic obstructions in creativework. Through a collaboration between HCI and Music InformationRetrieval, we conducted open-ended interviewswith professional makers of Electronic Dance Music. Wedescribe how the idea emerged from this process, and considerhow algorithmic recommendation systems could bere-considered as tools for artistic inspiration. We proposethe concept of a “Strangeness Dial,” which allows the gradualadjustment of the degree of desired otherness, which istested through the use of a non-functional prop and a seriesof interviews.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: ACM Press, 2016
Keywords
Participatory; recommendation; defamiliarisation; interviews; creativity
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214012 (URN)10.1145/2851581.2892439 (DOI)2-s2.0-85003618669 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI 2016
Projects
GiantSteps
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 610591
Note

QC 20170913

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
6. Anti-Solutionist Strategies: Seriously Silly Design Fiction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-Solutionist Strategies: Seriously Silly Design Fiction
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '16), New York, USA: ACM Press, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Much of the academic and commercial work that seeks toinnovate around technology has been dismissed as“solutionist” because it solves problems that don’t exist orignores the complexity of personal, political andenvironmental issues. This paper traces the “solutionism”critique to its origins in city planning and highlights theoriginal concern with imaging and representation in thedesign process. It is increasingly cheap and easy to createcompelling and seductive images of concept designs, whichsell solutions and presume problems. We consider a rangeof strategies, which explicitly reject the search for“solutions”. These include design fiction and critical designbut also less well-known techniques, which aim forunuseless, questionable and silly designs. We present twoexamples of “magic machine” workshops whereparticipants are encouraged to reject realistic premises forpossible technological interventions and create absurdpropositions from lo-fi materials. We argue that suchpractices may help researchers resist the impulse towardssolutionism and suggest that attention to representationduring the ideation process is a key strategy for this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: ACM Press, 2016
Keywords
Design fiction, well being, older people
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214014 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858482 (DOI)000380532904088 ()2-s2.0-84997357867 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CHI 2016
Note

QC 20170919

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
7. 821 words and 20 images
Open this publication in new window or tab >>821 words and 20 images
2014 (English)In: No Patent Pending: self-made performative media, Germany: iii editions with MER. Paper Kunsthalle , 2014Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Germany: iii editions with MER. Paper Kunsthalle, 2014
National Category
Performing Arts
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214016 (URN)978 94 9177 567 3 (ISBN)
Note

QC 20170929

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2017-09-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf