Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Crafting Experience: Designing Digital Musical Instruments for Long-Term Use in Artistic Practice
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2659-0411
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis collects a series of publications that all present work where digital musical instruments (DMIs) played a central role. While the papers focus on the individual projects where the DMIs where created, the first part of this thesis describes patterns and insights arrived at by comparing the projects and the DMIs, as well as discuss them in the context of other contemporary research.

The projects described in the included papers all are quite different, but the role I performed in them was consistent in many ways. I position my- self as a craftsperson, and trace the practice of crafting digital musical instru- ments through the projects. As a working metaphor, I present the idea of the DMI-craftsperson as a translator between different domains. This requires a broader outlook than the mechanics of the instruments themselves, including some working understanding of the domains that the DMI interacts with.

The relationship between DMIs and contemporary musical practice is a thread that runs through the work. I criticise the practice of exclusively performing laboratory based evaluations, and the concept of rigid and requirements based evaluations of artistic artefacts. Instead, I argue, relying on Sonic Interaction Design and embodied aesthetics, that the complexities and nuances of perfor- mance can only be fully explored by engaging in long-term artistic practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2018. , p. 82
Series
TRITA-EECS-AVL
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-227247ISBN: 978-91-7729-761-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-227247DiVA, id: diva2:1203913
Public defence
2018-05-25, F3, KTH-Campus, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 14:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20180507

Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Artistically directed prototyping in development and in practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artistically directed prototyping in development and in practice
2012 (English)In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 377-387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of technology in artistic contexts presents interestingchallenges regarding the processes in which engineers, artists andperformers work together. The artistic intent and goals of the participantsare relevant both when shaping the development practice, and in definingand refining the role of technology in practice. In this paper wepresent strategies for structuring the development process, basedon iterative design and participatory design. The concepts are describedin theory and examples are given of how they have been successfullyapplied. The cases make heavy use of different types of prototypingand this practice is also discussed. The development cases all relateto a single artifact, a gestural voice processing instrument calledThe Throat. This artifact has been in use since it was developed,and from that experience, three cases are presented. The focus ofthese cases is on how artistic vision through practice can recontextualizetechnology, and, without rebuilding it, redefine it and give it anew role to play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2012
Keywords
Usability, Design
National Category
Computer Sciences Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-109390 (URN)10.1080/09298215.2012.738233 (DOI)000312443400008 ()2-s2.0-84871141307 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20130118. QC 20160115

Available from: 2013-01-02 Created: 2013-01-02 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
2. Singing Interaction: Embodied Instruments for Musical Expression in Opera
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Singing Interaction: Embodied Instruments for Musical Expression in Opera
2014 (English)In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 24, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the opera Sing the Body Electric! A Corporatorio, artists from the disciplines of opera, dance and the development of new musical instruments collaborated to create an onstage fusion of different technologies and artistic practices that connected performer, scenography and instrument. Gestures and movements of singers were captured by custom-built technologies. The singers also used custom-built technologies for transforming their vocal qualities and for creating synthesized accompaniment in real time. In this way the singers’ bodily musical processes further extended their vocal performances, rooted in operatic praxis, allowing for heightened expressivity and emergent scenic subjects.

National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction; Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158993 (URN)10.1162/LMJ_a_00187 (DOI)000347788700003 ()
Note

QC 20150119

Available from: 2015-01-19 Created: 2015-01-19 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
3. Modes of sonic interaction in circus: Three proofs of concept
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modes of sonic interaction in circus: Three proofs of concept
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of Sound and Music Computing Conference 2014, Athens, 2014, p. 1698-1706Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The art of circus is a vibrant and competitive culture that embraces new tools and technology. In this paper, a series of exploratory design processes resulting in proofs of concepts are presented, showing strategies for effective use of three different modes of sonic interaction in contemporary circus. Each design process is based on participatory studio work, involving professional circus artists. All of the proofs of concepts have been evaluated, both with studio studies and public circus performances, taking the work beyond theoretical laboratory projects and properly engaging the practice and culture of contemporary circus.The first exploration uses a contortionist’s extreme bodily manipulation as inspiration for sonic manipulations in an accompanying piece of music. The second exploration uses electric amplification of acoustic sounds as a transformative enhancement of existing elements of circus performance. Finally, a sensor based system of real-time sonification of body gestures is explored and ideas from the sonification of dance are translated into the realm of circus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athens: , 2014
National Category
Computer Sciences Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158166 (URN)2-s2.0-84908891914 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Sound and Music Computing Conference 2014
Note

QC 20150224

Available from: 2014-12-30 Created: 2014-12-30 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
4. Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads
2017 (English)In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 27, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the medieval tradition of ballads, a recurring theme is that of transformation. In a staged concert for chamber orchestra, singers and dancers called Varelser och Ballader (Beings and Ballads), we explored this theme using ballads coupled with contemporary poetry and new music. The performance made use of custom-made digital musical instruments, using video analysis and large-scale physical interfaces for transformative purposes. In this article, we describe the piece itself as well as how uncanny qualities of the digital were used to emphasize eerie themes of transformation and deception by the supernatural beings found in the medieval ballads.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2017
National Category
Music
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-220476 (URN)10.1162/LMJ_a_01020 (DOI)000416826400023 ()2-s2.0-85037632721 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20171221

Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
5. SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Sound and Music Computing 2016, SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK , 2016, p. 79-84Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

 In this paper we present a string-based, interactive, largescale installation for a new museum dedicated to performing arts, Scenkonstmuseet, which will be inaugurated in 2017 in Stockholm, Sweden. The installation will occupy an entire room that measures 10x5 meters. We aim to create a digital musical instrument (DMI) that facilitates intuitive musical interaction, thereby enabling visitors to quickly start creating music either alone or together. The interface should be able to serve as a pedagogical tool; visitors should be able to learn about concepts related to music and music making by interacting with the DMI. Since the lifespan of the installation will be approximately five years, one main concern is to create an experience that will encourage visitors to return to the museum for continued instrument exploration. In other words, the DMI should be designed to facilitate long-term engagement. Finally, an important aspect in the design of the installation is that the DMI should be accessible and provide a rich experience for all museum visitors, regardless of age or abilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK, 2016
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Media Engineering Interaction Technologies Music Performing Arts
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192919 (URN)978-3-00-053700-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Sound and Music Computing 2016
Projects
Ljudskogen
Note

QC 20160926

Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
6. Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY, USA: ACM , 2015, p. 275-278Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present Nebula, a prototype for examining the properties of textiles, fashion accessories, and digital technologies to arrive at a garment design that brings these elements together in a cohesive manner. Bridging the gap between everyday performativity and enactment, we aim at discussing aspects of the making process, interaction and functional aesthetics that emerged. Nebula is part of the Sound Clothes project that aims at exploring the expressive potential of wearable technologies creating sound from motion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2015
Series
CHI EA '15
Keywords
design process, fashion, music computation, wearable technology
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170399 (URN)10.1145/2702613.2725454 (DOI)2-s2.0-84954230456 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3146-3 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI 2015
Projects
SoundClothes
Note

QC 20150630

Available from: 2015-06-30 Created: 2015-06-30 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(7873 kB)97 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 7873 kBChecksum SHA-512
ec91c5e0be7322e87041eb9050d57ec2441619fe23f191653d8b5336945e1fb027e6f223e58664ff5add449d440ef9a12f5fc48928cf8083d0ef687e225457a0
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Elblaus, Ludvig
By organisation
Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 97 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 591 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf