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Changes in brain architecture are consistent with altered fear processing in domestic rabbits
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
Univ Porto, Ctr Invest Biodiversidade & Recursos Genet CIBIO, InBIO, P-4485661 Vairao, Portugal.;Univ Porto, Dept Biol, Fac Ciencias, P-4169007 Porto, Portugal..
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0442-3524
Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab Uppsala, Dept Med Biochem & Microbiol, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 28, p. 7380-7385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The most characteristic feature of domestic animals is their change in behavior associated with selection for tameness. Here we show, using high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging in wild and domestic rabbits, that domestication reduced amygdala volume and enlarged medial prefrontal cortex volume, supporting that areas driving fear have lost volume while areas modulating negative affect have gained volume during domestication. In contrast to the localized gray matter alterations, white matter anisotropy was reduced in the corona radiata, corpus callosum, and the subcortical white matter. This suggests a compromised white matter structural integrity in projection and association fibers affecting both afferent and efferent neural flow, consistent with reduced neural processing. We propose that compared with their wild ancestors, domestic rabbits are less fearful and have an attenuated flight response because of these changes in brain architecture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences , 2018. Vol. 115, no 28, p. 7380-7385
Keywords [en]
rabbit, domestication, brain morphology, magnetic resonance imaging, fear
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232773DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1801024115ISI: 000438050900076PubMedID: 29941556Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85049643502OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-232773DiVA, id: diva2:1237038
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research CouncilThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Note

QC 20180807

Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Wang, ChunliangSmedby, Örjan

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