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A Comparison of Visualisation Methods for Disambiguating Verbal Requests in Human-Robot Interaction
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8874-6629
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
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2018 (English)In: 2018 27th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN) 2018 27th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Picking up objects requested by a human user is a common task in human-robot interaction. When multiple objects match the user's verbal description, the robot needs to clarify which object the user is referring to before executing the action. Previous research has focused on perceiving user's multimodal behaviour to complement verbal commands or minimising the number of follow up questions to reduce task time. In this paper, we propose a system for reference disambiguation based on visualisation and compare three methods to disambiguate natural language instructions. In a controlled experiment with a YuMi robot, we investigated realtime augmentations of the workspace in three conditions - head-mounted display, projector, and a monitor as the baseline - using objective measures such as time and accuracy, and subjective measures like engagement, immersion, and display interference. Significant differences were found in accuracy and engagement between the conditions, but no differences were found in task time. Despite the higher error rates in the head-mounted display condition, participants found that modality more engaging than the other two, but overall showed preference for the projector condition over the monitor and head-mounted display conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-235548DOI: 10.1109/ROMAN.2018.8525554ISBN: 978-1-5386-7981-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-235548DiVA, id: diva2:1252067
Conference
ROMAN 2018
Note

QC 20181207

Available from: 2018-09-29 Created: 2018-09-29 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Sibirtseva, ElenaNykvist, OlovLeite, IolandaGustafson, JoakimKragic, Danica

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Sibirtseva, ElenaKontogiorgos, DimosthenisNykvist, OlovKaraoguz, HakanLeite, IolandaGustafson, JoakimKragic, Danica
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