Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Improved safety standards are needed to better protect younger children at playgrounds
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Neuronic Engineering.
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Neuronic Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0125-0784
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 15061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Playground-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children remain a considerable problem world-wide and current safety standards are being questioned due to historical reasons where the injury thresholds had been perpetuated from automobile industry. Here we investigated head injury mechanisms due to falls on playgrounds using a previously developed and validated age-scalable and positionable whole body child model impacted at front, back and side of the head simulating head-first falls from 1.59 meters (m). The results show that a playground material passing the current testing standards (HIC < 1000 and resultant linear acceleration <200g) resulted in maximum strain in the brain higher than known injury thresholds, thus not offering sufficient protection especially for younger children. The analysis highlights the age dependence of head injuries in children due to playground falls and the youngest have a higher risk of brain injury and skull fracture. Further, the results provide the first biomechanical evidence guiding age-dependent injury thresholds for playground testing standards. The results also have direct implications for novel designs of playground materials for a better protection of children from TBIs. Only making the playground material thicker and more compliant is not sufficient. This study represents the first initiative of using full body human body models of children as a new tool to improve playground testing standards and to better protect the children at playgrounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018. Vol. 8, no 1, article id 15061
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-237094DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-33393-zISI: 000446856000009PubMedID: 30305685Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054699576OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-237094DiVA, id: diva2:1258436
Note

QC 20181022

Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Li, XiaogaiKleiven, Svein

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Li, XiaogaiKleiven, Svein
By organisation
Neuronic Engineering
In the same journal
Scientific Reports
Neurosciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 107 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf