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Interactive sonification of a fluid dance movement: an exploratory study
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4422-5223
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2659-0411
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3086-0322
2019 (English)In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present three different experiments designed to explore sound properties associated with fluid movement: (1) an experiment in which participants adjusted parameters of a sonification model developed for a fluid dance movement, (2) a vocal sketching experiment in which participants sketched sounds portraying fluid versus nonfluid movements, and (3) a workshop in which participants discussed and selected fluid versus nonfluid sounds. Consistent findings from the three experiments indicated that sounds expressing fluidity generally occupy a lower register and has less high frequency content, as well as a lower bandwidth, than sounds expressing nonfluidity. The ideal sound to express fluidity is continuous, calm, slow, pitched, reminiscent of wind, water or an acoustic musical instrument. The ideal sound to express nonfluidity is harsh, non-continuous, abrupt, dissonant, conceptually associated with metal or wood, unhuman and robotic. Findings presented in this paper can be used as design guidelines for future applications in which the movement property fluidity is to be conveyed through sonification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 13, no 3, p. 181-189
Keywords [en]
Interactive sonification, Fluid movement, Vocal sketching, sound and music computing
National Category
Media Engineering Media and Communication Technology Human Computer Interaction Other Natural Sciences Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-239168DOI: 10.1007/s12193-018-0278-yISI: 000480549700004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056702595OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-239168DiVA, id: diva2:1263917
Projects
DANCE
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 645553
Note

QC 20190904

Available from: 2018-11-18 Created: 2018-11-18 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved

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Frid, EmmaElblaus, LudvigBresin, Roberto
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