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Climate impact and energy efficiency of woody bioenergy systems from a landscape perspective
Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Energy & Technol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
SLU, Dept Soil & Environm, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5979-9521
SLU, Dept Forest Resource Management, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden..
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2019 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 120, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The climate impact of bioenergy is debated, especially due to potential land use change effects and biogenic carbon fluxes. This study assessed the climate impact and energy efficiency of conventional long-rotation forest residues (branches, tops and stumps) and short-rotation forestry (willow) from a landscape perspective. A time-dependent life cycle assessment method, which considers the timing of biogenic carbon fluxes and the impact on global temperature over time, was combined with GIS mapping to assess the impact for a specific Swedish region (Uppsala County), i.e. a 'real' landscape. The results showed that harvesting forest residues decreased the forest carbon stocks over the landscape, while growing willow on previous fallow land increased the total carbon stocks. On average, energy ratios of 49 MJ MJ(-1) for branches and tops, and 30 MJ MJ(-1) for stumps and willow was found. Harvesting forest residues from the studied landscape resulted in climate impacts of around 0.8.10(-15) K MJ(-1) heat for branches and tops, and 1.3.10(-15) K MJ(-1) heat for stumps. Willow energy gave the lowest climate impact of about -0.6,10(-15) K MJ(-1) heat. The landscape analysis showed that spatial variations in the region had an effect on energy efficiency and climate impact, but that this effect was relatively small. A more important factor was the time frame chosen for the analysis, especially for long-rotation forest systems. Methodological choices such as spatial scale (stand or landscape perspective), allocation method and functional unit also influenced the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2019. Vol. 120, p. 189-199
Keywords [en]
Global warming, Temperature change, Soil organic carbon, Salix, GIS, Forest residues, Stumps, Land use, Biogenic carbon, LCA
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-242253DOI: 10.1016/j.biombioe.2018.11.026ISI: 000454887700019Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057143425OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-242253DiVA, id: diva2:1284477
Note

QC 20190131

Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved

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Sundberg, Cecilia

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