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Impact of bus electrification on carbon emissions: The case of Stockholm
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2896-8841
IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria..
Maastricht Univ, Biobased Mat Dept, Geleen, Netherlands..
IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria..
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 209, p. 74-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the potential impact of various options for decarbonization of public bus transport in Stockholm, with particular attention to electrification. An optimization model is used to locate electric bus chargers and to estimate the associated carbon emissions, using a life cycle perspective and various implementation scenarios. Emissions associated with fuels and batteries of electric powertrains are considered to be the two main factors affecting carbon emissions. The results show that, although higher battery capacities could help electrify more routes of the city's bus network, this does not necessarily lead to a reduction of the total emissions. The results show the lowest life cycle emissions occurring when electric buses use batteries with a capacity of 120 kWh. The fuel choices significantly influence the environmental impact of a bus network. For example, the use of electricity is a better choice than first generation biofuels from a carbon emission perspective. However, the use of second -generation biofuels, such as Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO), can directly compete with the Nordic electricity mix. Among all fuel options, certified renewable electricity has the lowest impact. The analysis also shows that electrification could be beneficial for reduction of local pollutants in the Stockholm inner city; however, the local emissions of public transport are much lower than emissions from private transport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD , 2019. Vol. 209, p. 74-87
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-244097DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.085ISI: 000457351900008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056180054OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-244097DiVA, id: diva2:1289815
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 39254-1
Note

QC 20190219

Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved

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Xylia, MariaSilveira, Semida

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