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Cellulose Nanopaper with Monolithically Integrated Conductive Micropatterns
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0298-8553
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5818-2378
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9088-1064
2019 (English)In: Advanced Electronic Materials, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1800924Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work presents a route to fabricate micropatterned conductive structures where the conductors are monolithically integrated with nanocellulose-based paper. To fabricate conductive features, microstructures are patterned on filter papers using wax-printing, followed by vacuum filtration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or silver nanowires (AgNWs) dispersed in aqueous cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). These patterns are then laminated onto a pure CNF substrate (both in gel-state) and dried to form cellulose nanopapers with integrated conductive micropatterns. Resolutions of the conductive features are shown down to 400 µm wide, 250 nm thick, and with conductivity values of 115 ± 5 S cm −1 for the CNF–CNT and 3770 ± 230 S cm −1 for the CNF–AgNW micropatterns. The nanopaper and the conductive patterns both constitute random fibrous networks, and they display similar ductility and swelling behavior in water. Thus, the integrated conductive micropatterns can withstand folding, as well as wetting cycles. This stability of the micropatterns makes them useful in various devices based on nanocellulose substrates. As an example, an electroanalytical nanopaper device that operates in wet conditions is demonstrated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019. Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1800924
Keywords [en]
carbon nanotubes, nanocelluloses, nanopapers, nanowires, printed electronics
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246492DOI: 10.1002/aelm.201800924ISI: 000461544600030Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85060195677OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-246492DiVA, id: diva2:1297292
Note

QC 20190319

Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved

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Hajian, AlirezaWang, Zhen

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Hajian, AlirezaWang, ZhenBerglund, Lars. AHamedi, Mahiar M.
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Fibre- and Polymer TechnologyWallenberg Wood Science CenterFibre Technology
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