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Intermittent theta burst stimulation over right somatosensory larynx cortex enhances vocal pitch‐regulation in nonsingers
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2926-6518
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2019 (English)In: Human Brain Mapping, ISSN 1065-9471, E-ISSN 1097-0193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the significance of auditory cortical regions for the development and maintenance of speech motor coordination is well established, the contribution of somatosensory brain areas to learned vocalizations such as singing is less well understood. To address these mechanisms, we applied intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a facilitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocol, over right somatosensory larynx cortex (S1) and a nonvocal dorsal S1 control area in participants without singing experience. A pitch‐matching singing task was performed before and after iTBS to assess corresponding effects on vocal pitch regulation. When participants could monitor auditory feedback from their own voice during singing (Experiment I), no difference in pitch‐matching performance was found between iTBS sessions. However, when auditory feedback was masked with noise (Experiment II), only larynx‐S1 iTBS enhanced pitch accuracy (50–250 ms after sound onset) and pitch stability (>250 ms after sound onset until the end). Results indicate that somatosensory feedback plays a dominant role in vocal pitch regulation when acoustic feedback is masked. The acoustic changes moreover suggest that right larynx‐S1 stimulation affected the preparation and involuntary regulation of vocal pitch accuracy, and that kinesthetic‐proprioceptive processes play a role in the voluntary control of pitch stability in nonsingers. Together, these data provide evidence for a causal involvement of right larynx‐S1 in vocal pitch regulation during singing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
predictive coding; sensorimotor; singing; TMS; vocal production
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-247968DOI: 10.1002/hbm.24515ISI: 000463153200014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85060332109OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-247968DiVA, id: diva2:1300862
Note

QC 20190429

Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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