Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Involving users and user roles in the transition to sustainable mobility systems: The case of light electric vehicle sharing in Sweden
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4685-9174
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4488-1028
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0167-7385
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 71, p. 207-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low-carbon mobility alternatives, such as shared services integrating light electric vehicles, support transitions to sustainable transport systems. However, new products and services are not enough, as changes must also incorporate the practices of travelling, infrastructure, and mobility cultures in which users of mobility solutions are core stakeholders. This paper argues that userinvolvement is necessary in sustainable innovation processes but that the expected diversity of user roles and their involvement can also lead to contrasting outcomes for sustainable innovation transitions. Guided by theory in user involvement, this study investigated users and nonusers of light electric vehicles in a sharing mobility service system set up as living lab in two large workplaces in Sweden. Fifty-one interviews with employees at the workplaces were conducted during the implementation process and analysed combined with a questionnaire and data from system tracking through sensor technology. The paper finds that both users and non-users are co-creators in building momentum for sustainable mobility alternatives and provides a spectrum of user roles with defined characteristics. Four roles are distinguished within this spectrum: vigilant users, passive collaborators, active decision makers and ambassadors. We suggest that a convergent activation strategy is deployed for involving a full spectrum of users in order to capture their insights in ways that positively affect transition. Such a strategy addresses users and non-users as part of decision-making concerning alternatives and cultivates a culture of user collaboration, while also enabling a plurality of contributions in order to challenge existing regimes and established practices among individuals

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 71, p. 207-221
Keywords [en]
User roles; User involvement; Sustainable innovation; Shared mobility services; Ambassadors
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250288DOI: 10.1016/j.trd.2018.12.011ISI: 000471361300014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-250288DiVA, id: diva2:1307615
Projects
KTH Mobility Pool
Note

QC 20190429

Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2712 kB)119 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2712 kBChecksum SHA-512
aefbea79d45f08b53e52d32afb4a0b15c67347a924681f7d2f7b0748ec13de252dcaf998c658439f0e43557f65bd17af0795bb8bd67ba032fc79fa6cb4cd1f92
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Sopjani, SanijeJanhager Stier, JennyRitzén, SofiaHesselgren, MiaGeorén, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sopjani, SanijeJanhager Stier, JennyRitzén, SofiaHesselgren, MiaGeorén, Peter
By organisation
Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRLIntegrated Product DevelopmentMachine Design (Div.)Product and Service DesignGreen LeapSchool of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM)
In the same journal
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
Transport Systems and Logistics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 119 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 350 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf