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Mild diabetic neuropathy affects ankle motor function
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics. University of Michigan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Biomechanics. (Biomechanics)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5417-5939
2001 (English)In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 522-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To evaluate the effect of age and diabetic neuropathy on ankle motor function in the frontal plane in terms of rate of torque development and capability for balance recovery.

Design. Case control study. Six older women with diabetic neuropathy compared to six women without neuropathy, matched for age and presence of diabetes mellitus; and nine healthy young women.

Background. Neuropathy causes a distal impairment in lower extremity sensory function which increases fall risk. Impairments in ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds have been identified, but the effect of neuropathy on ankle motor strength in the frontal plane is unknown.

Methods. Subjects' abilities to recover from a lateral lean (with center of gravity offset as percentage of foot width) while standing on one foot, and to rapidly generate inversion torque about the ankle, were quantified.

Results. All nine of the young, but only one of six older, control subjects recovered from a 10% lean (P=0.0052). Three of six older controls, but no neuropathy subject, recovered from a 5% lean (P=0.083). Neuropathy subjects demonstrated half the ankle rate of torque development [78.2 (50.8) N m/s; P=0.016] of the young and older controls [162.0 (54.6) and 152.7 (22.2) N m/s, respectively].

Conclusions. Diabetic neuropathy leads to a decrease in rapidly available ankle strength which impairs balance recovery among older women. Younger women demonstrate similar ankle strength but superior balance recovery compared to older women without neuropathy.Relevance

Older women with diabetic neuropathy and normal ankle strength, as judged by clinical muscle testing, demonstrate a sub-clinical impairment in ankle motor function suggesting a target for intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 16, no 6, p. 522-528
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-251514DOI: 10.1016/S0268-0033(01)00034-1OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-251514DiVA, id: diva2:1315821
Note

QCR 20190515

Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved

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