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Experimental study of convective heat transfer in nanofluids
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9902-2087
2015 (English)In: Heat Transfer Enhancement with Nanofluids, CRC Press , 2015, p. 181-206Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The term nanofluid describing diluted suspensions of metal or metal oxide nanoparticles in water was first introduced by Choi and Eastman in 1995 during the International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition (ASME) congress [1]. They claimed, based on rather limited number of experimental data, that diluted suspensions of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles in water have unusually high thermal conductivity, much higher than expected based on the commonly used effective medium theory [2]. This chapter and the concept of “exceptional” nanofluids went rather unnoticed, and between 1995 and 2001, there were only a few papers published on nanofluids. In 2001, a US patent was granted [3], supported by two graphs with no error bars, claiming that thermal conductivity of fluids can be substantially increased by the addition of small amounts of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles. Since then the research on nanofluids has steeply accelerated with more than 2500 papers published between 2001 and 2014. It needs to be stressed here that despite this exponential growth in the number of publications, only part of heat transfer research community accepted the claims about exceptional properties of nanofluids. One of the authors attended a conference on heat transfer in nanofluids [4], where nearly 50% of the participants were highly skeptical about exceptional thermal properties of the nanofluids. The acceleration in research and very strong interest in nanofluids were not surprising. If the claims made in the US patent were correct and stable suspensions of nanoparticles with high thermal conductivity and relatively low viscosity could be produced at reasonable cost, this would be a serious breakthrough in a wide range of processes, in which the heat transfer is frequently a limiting step such as engine cooling, cooling of electronic devices, and nuclear systems cooling, to name a few [5]. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press , 2015. p. 181-206
Keywords [en]
Cooling systems, Electronic cooling, Heat convection, Metal nanoparticles, Metals, Patents and inventions, Thermal conductivity of liquids, Conductivity of fluids, Convective heat transfer, Cooling of electronic devices, Effective medium theories, High thermal conductivity, Metal oxide nanoparticles, Oxide nanoparticles, Research communities, Nanofluidics
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-246645DOI: 10.1201/b18324Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054281956OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-246645DiVA, id: diva2:1326470
Note

QC 20190618

Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Haghighi, EhsanPalm, Björn

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