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Stainless steel in simulated milk and whey protein solutions - Influence of grade on corrosion and metal release
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2206-0082
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2145-3650
2020 (English)In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 331, article id 135428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reactions at the biointerfaces between stainless steel and protein-rich dairy products, which contain whey proteins, are important to consider in terms of food safety and material grade selection. Changes in corrosion behavior, metal release, and surface composition of austenitic (AISI 316 L), ferritic (AISI 430), and lean duplex (LDX 2101) stainless steels in simulated milk (SMS) and whey protein solution were investigated. The amount of released metals and the corrosion susceptibility increased according to 2101 < 316 L < 430. All grades revealed low corrosion rates in the whey protein solution without any sign of active/metastable corrosion. Pitting corrosion was evident for 430 in SMS. The total amount of released metals (iron, chromium, and nickel) was significantly higher in whey protein solution compared with SMS. This suggests the metal release process to be mainly governed by complexation reactions. Nickel was preferentially released compared to its bulk composition fraction for both 316 L and 2101 in the highly complexing SMS. Reduced metal release rates with time correlated with the enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide. The extent of metal release was for all metals substantially lower than release limits of metals stipulated in health regulations related to the use of alloys and metals in food-related environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2020. Vol. 331, article id 135428
Keywords [en]
Surface oxide, Complexation, Pitting corrosion, Food safety, Biocorrosion
National Category
Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-266917DOI: 10.1016/j.electacta.2019.135428ISI: 000506011100088Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85075909344OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-266917DiVA, id: diva2:1393266
Note

QC 20200214

Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved

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Atapour, MasoudOdnevall Wallinder, IngerHedberg, Yolanda

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