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Scope for Circular Economy Model in Urban Agri-Food Value Chains
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0253-3380
Department of Methods and Models for Economics, Territory and FinanceUniversità Di Roma “La Sapienza”RomeItaly.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0863-3550
2021 (English)In: Sustainable Consumption and Production, Volume II: Circular Economy and Beyond / [ed] Ranjula Bali Swain and Susanne Sweet, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1, p. 75-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we discuss why in food waste and loss and energy debate community-led initiatives and alternative economies deserve to be looked at more seriously when considering support to circular economy approaches, modelling, and adaptation in the urban context. We focus on the emergence of two types of community-led initiatives in the energy and agri-food sectors. We draw parallels between their role in bringing variety to experimentation when applying circular economy principles in practice. To better understand the potential of combining alternative urban agri-food networks with community-led energy initiatives in sustainable transformation of urban production and consumption systems, it is important to recognize that the uptake of visions or strategies of circularity is affected by the availability and strength of social networks, driving forces behind their emergence and persistence, and technological solutions within and for these grassroots initiatives. We recognize three conditions to building resilient sustainable urban food networks: understanding of multiple urban flows from a coupled systems-perspective, the diversification of knowledge, and overcoming structural and cultural resistance to change. Different framings, such as in narrow terms of innovations focused on technological optimisation, can slow down recognition and reaping benefits from interdependencies of food and energy infrastructures, networks, and institutions. We argue that there is a need for better understanding of how can measures directed at minimizing food waste and loss and wider uptake of sustainable energy systems be coupled and complementary in a more circular urban economy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1. p. 75-97
Keywords [en]
Urban circularity Community-led sustainable energy transition Food waste and loss Sector coupling
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis, Strategies for sustainable development; Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-285924DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-55285-5_5Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85111452425OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-285924DiVA, id: diva2:1500786
Note

QC 20201117

Available from: 2020-11-13 Created: 2020-11-13 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopushttp://DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-55285-5_5

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Henrysson, Maryna

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