kth.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Diagnostic Plot—A Tutorial with a Ten Year Perspective
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1146-3241
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8667-0520
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1663-3553
2021 (English)In: Progress in Turbulence IX: Proceedings of the iTi Conference in Turbulence 2021, Springer Nature , 2021, Vol. 267, p. 125-135Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The diagnostic plot was introduced in 2010 (Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 29: 403–406) but was used already in 2008 during a large measurement campaign as a litmus test to determine if tripped zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers fulfilled basic criteria of being canonical. It used the rms-level of streamwise velocity (urms ) in the outer part of the boundary layer, a region where urms can give clear indications if insufficient or too tough tripping has been used. In standard plots one needs both the friction velocity and measurement of the full velocity and turbulence profiles. By instead plotting urms/ U∞ as a function of U/ U∞, it was found that this gives rise to a well-defined distribution that could be used as a canonical measure. It was later discovered that it is possible to extend the description to the near wall region. It has also been extended to boundary layers over rough surfaces and with pressure gradients, and some further uses. This paper aims to be both a review of the development of the method during the last 10+ years and a tutorial for those who want to employ it in their research and maybe also find new uses of the methodology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature , 2021. Vol. 267, p. 125-135
Series
Springer Proceedings in Physics, ISSN 0930-8989 ; 267
Keywords [en]
Atmospheric thermodynamics, Boundary layer flow, Pressure gradient, Turbulence, Turbulent flow
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-313231DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-80716-0_17Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85119016980OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-313231DiVA, id: diva2:1662815
Conference
9th iTi Conference on Turbulence, iTi 2021, 25 February 2021 through 26 February 2021, Virtual, Online
Note

QC 20220601

Part of proceedings: ISBN 978-303080715-3

Available from: 2022-06-01 Created: 2022-06-01 Last updated: 2022-06-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Alfredsson, HenrikSegalini, AntonioÖrlü, Ramis

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Alfredsson, HenrikSegalini, AntonioÖrlü, Ramis
By organisation
Engineering MechanicsFluid Mechanics and Engineering AcousticsLinné Flow Center, FLOW
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 286 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf