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Metabolic modelling of the human gut microbiome in type 2 diabetes patients in response to metformin treatment
Kings Coll London, Fac Dent Oral & Craniofacial Sci, Ctr Host Microbiome Interact, London SE1 9RT, England.;Kings Coll London, St Johns Inst Dermatol, Unit Populat Based Dermatol, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, London, England..
Kings Coll London, Fac Dent Oral & Craniofacial Sci, Ctr Host Microbiome Interact, London SE1 9RT, England..
Kings Coll London, Fac Dent Oral & Craniofacial Sci, Ctr Host Microbiome Interact, London SE1 9RT, England.;AIVIVO Ltd, Bioinnovat Ctr, Unit 25, Cambridge Sci Pk, Cambridge, England..
Kings Coll London, Fac Dent Oral & Craniofacial Sci, Ctr Host Microbiome Interact, London SE1 9RT, England..
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2023 (English)In: NPJ SYSTEMS BIOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS, ISSN 2056-7189, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human gut microbiome has been associated with several metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Understanding metabolic changes in the gut microbiome is important to elucidate the role of gut bacteria in regulating host metabolism. Here, we used available metagenomics data from a metformin study, together with genome-scale metabolic modelling of the key bacteria in individual and community-level to investigate the mechanistic role of the gut microbiome in response to metformin. Individual modelling predicted that species that are increased after metformin treatment have higher growth rates in comparison to species that are decreased after metformin treatment. Gut microbial enrichment analysis showed prior to metformin treatment pathways related to the hypoglycemic effect were enriched. Our observations highlight how the key bacterial species after metformin treatment have commensal and competing behavior, and how their cellular metabolism changes due to different nutritional environment. Integrating different diets showed there were specific microbial alterations between different diets. These results show the importance of the nutritional environment and how dietary guidelines may improve drug efficiency through the gut microbiota.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature , 2023. Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-323908DOI: 10.1038/s41540-022-00261-6ISI: 000919036900001PubMedID: 36681701Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85146732489OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-323908DiVA, id: diva2:1739722
Note

QC 20230227

Available from: 2023-02-27 Created: 2023-02-27 Last updated: 2023-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Uhlén, MathiasShoaie, Saeed

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