kth.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Can the robot "see" what I see?: Robot gaze drives attention depending on mental state attribution
Örebro Univ, Ctr Appl Autonomous Sensor Syst, Örebro, Sweden..
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
Örebro Univ, Ctr Appl Autonomous Sensor Syst, Örebro, Sweden..
Show others and affiliations
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1215771Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mentalizing, where humans infer the mental states of others, facilitates understanding and interaction in social situations. Humans also tend to adopt mentalizing strategies when interacting with robotic agents. There is an ongoing debate about how inferred mental states affect gaze following, a key component of joint attention. Although the gaze from a robot induces gaze following, the impact of mental state attribution on robotic gaze following remains unclear. To address this question, we asked forty-nine young adults to perform a gaze cueing task during which mental state attribution was manipulated as follows. Participants sat facing a robot that turned its head to the screen at its left or right. Their task was to respond to targets that appeared either at the screen the robot gazed at or at the other screen. At the baseline, the robot was positioned so that participants would perceive it as being able to see the screens. We expected faster response times to targets at the screen the robot gazed at than targets at the non-gazed screen (i.e., gaze cueing effect). In the experimental condition, the robot's line of sight was occluded by a physical barrier such that participants would perceive it as unable to see the screens. Our results revealed gaze cueing effects in both conditions although the effect was reduced in the occluded condition compared to the baseline. These results add to the expanding fields of social cognition and human-robot interaction by suggesting that mentalizing has an impact on robotic gaze following.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA , 2023. Vol. 14, article id 1215771
Keywords [en]
gaze following, cueing effect, attention, mentalizing, intentional stance, social robots
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-333787DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1215771ISI: 001037081700001PubMedID: 37519379Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85166030431OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-333787DiVA, id: diva2:1786901
Note

QC 20230810

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2023-08-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Stower, RebeccaSleat, AlexLeite, Iolanda

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stower, RebeccaSleat, AlexLeite, Iolanda
By organisation
Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL
In the same journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Human Computer Interaction

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf