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Biomechanical performance of resin composite on dental tissue restoration: A finite element analysis
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Mascara, Mascara, Algeria.
Department of Engineering Management, College of Engineering, Prince Sultan University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
Advanced Digital & Additive Manufacturing Center, Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Mascara, Mascara, Algeria.
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2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 12 December, article id e0295582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the biomechanical performance of various dental materials when filled in different cavity designs and their effects on surrounding dental tissues. Finite element models of three infected teeth with different cavity designs, Class I (occlusal), Class II mesial-occlusal (MO), and Class II mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) were constructed. These cavities were filled with amalgam, composites (Young’s moduli of 10, 14, 18, 22, and 26 GPa), and glass carbomer cement (GCC). An occlusal load of 600 N was distributed on the top surface of the teeth to carry out simulations. The findings revealed that von Mises stress was higher in GCC material, with cavity Class I (46.01 MPa in the enamel, 23.61 MPa in the dentin), and for cavity Class II MO von Mises stress was 43.64 MPa, 39.18 MPa in enamel and dentin respectively, while in case of cavity Class II MOD von Mises stress was 44.67 MPa in enamel, 27.5 in the dentin. The results showed that higher stresses were generated in the non-restored tooth compared to the restored one, and increasing Young’s modulus of restorative composite material decreases stresses in enamel and dentin. The use of composite material showed excellent performance which can be a good viable option for restorative material compared to other restorative materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS) , 2023. Vol. 18, no 12 December, article id e0295582
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Dentistry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-341945DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0295582ISI: 001153816100062PubMedID: 38128035Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85180309134OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-341945DiVA, id: diva2:1824760
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QC 20240108

Available from: 2024-01-08 Created: 2024-01-08 Last updated: 2024-02-21Bibliographically approved

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Barsoum, Imad

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