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Robotic mirror therapy for stroke rehabilitation through virtual activities of daily living
Health Care Engineering Systems Center, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign – 1206 W Clark St, Urbana, IL, USA, 61801, 1206 W Clark St.
Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign – 1308 W Main St, Urbana, IL, USA, 61801, 1308 W Main St.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0416-3846
Outpatient Rehabilitation, OSF Healthcare Saint Francis Medical Center – 6501 N Sheridan Rd, Peoria, IL, USA, 6501 N Sheridan Rd.
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2024 (English)In: Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal, E-ISSN 2001-0370, Vol. 24, p. 126-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mirror therapy is a standard technique of rehabilitation for recovering motor and vision abilities of stroke patients, especially in the case of asymmetric limb function. To enhance traditional mirror therapy, robotic mirror therapy (RMT) has been proposed over the past decade, allowing for assisted bimanual coordination of paretic (affected) and contralateral (healthy) limbs. However, state-of-the-art RMT platforms predominantly target mirrored motions of trajectories, largely limited to 2-D motions. In this paper, an RMT platform is proposed, which can facilitate the patient to practice virtual activities of daily living (ADL) and thus enhance their independence. Two similar (but mirrored) 3D virtual environments are created in which the patients operate robots with both their limbs to complete ADL (such as writing and eating) with the assistance of the therapist. The recovery level of the patient is continuously assessed by monitoring their ability to track assigned trajectories. The patient's robots are programmed to assist the patient in following these trajectories based on this recovery level. In this paper, the framework to dynamically monitor recovery level and accordingly provide assistance is developed along with the nonlinear controller design to ensure position tracking, force control, and stability. Proof-of-concept studies are conducted with both 3D trajectory tracking and ADL. The results demonstrate the potential use of the proposed system to enhance the recovery of the patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier BV , 2024. Vol. 24, p. 126-135
Keywords [en]
Force feedback, Mirror therapy, Nonlinear control, Patient recovery, Rehabilitation, Robotic assistance
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-343677DOI: 10.1016/j.csbj.2024.01.017ISI: 001179581000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85184518676OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-343677DiVA, id: diva2:1839869
Note

QC 20240222

Available from: 2024-02-22 Created: 2024-02-22 Last updated: 2024-04-04Bibliographically approved

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Deka, Shankar

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