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Proteome profiling of home-sampled dried blood spots reveals proteins of SARS-CoV-2 infections
KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7674-2014
KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2875-896x
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9329-2353
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
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2024 (English)In: Communications Medicine, E-ISSN 2730-664X, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Self-sampling of dried blood spots (DBS) offers new routes to gather valuable health-related information from the general population. Yet, the utility of using deep proteome profiling from home-sampled DBS to obtain clinically relevant insights about SARS-CoV-2 infections remains largely unexplored.Methods Our study involved 228 individuals from the general Swedish population who used a volumetric DBS sampling device and completed questionnaires at home during spring 2020 and summer 2021. Using multi-analyte COVID-19 serology, we stratified the donors by their response phenotypes, divided them into three study sets, and analyzed 276 proteins by proximity extension assays (PEA). After normalizing the data to account for variances in layman-collected samples, we investigated the association of DBS proteomes with serology and self-reported information.Results Our three studies display highly consistent variance of protein levels and share associations of proteins with sex (e.g., MMP3) and age (e.g., GDF-15). Studying seropositive (IgG+) and seronegative (IgG-) donors from the first pandemic wave reveals a network of proteins reflecting immunity, inflammation, coagulation, and stress response. A comparison of the early-infection phase (IgM+IgG-) with the post-infection phase (IgM-IgG+) indicates several proteins from the respiratory system. In DBS from the later pandemic wave, we find that levels of a virus receptor on B-cells differ between seropositive (IgG+) and seronegative (IgG-) donors.Conclusions Proteome analysis of volumetric self-sampled DBS facilitates precise analysis of clinically relevant proteins, including those secreted into the circulation or found on blood cells, augmenting previous COVID-19 reports with clinical blood collections. Our population surveys support the usefulness of DBS, underscoring the role of timing the sample collection to complement clinical and precision health monitoring initiatives. The COVID-19 pandemic has posed multiple challenges to healthcare systems. A significant gap that remains is a lack of understanding of the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on individuals who did not seek or require hospitalization. To address this, we distribute self-sampling devices to random citizens, aiming to analyze how blood protein levels are affected in people who have had COVID-19 but had no or mild symptoms. Conducting multiple molecular measurements in dried blood, our study confirms clinically known markers and their relationship to infection stages, even if the donors themselves collect the sample. Our work highlights the potential of combining self-sampling with laboratory methods to provide useful information on human health. This convenient patient-centric sampling approach may potentially be useful when studying other diseases. Fredolini et al. present a proteomics analysis of home-sampled dried blood spots taken from the general population in Stockholm during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study provides insights into the molecular effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in non-hospitalized individuals and demonstrates the compatibility of self-sampled blood spots with proteomics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature , 2024. Vol. 4, no 1, article id 55
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-345934DOI: 10.1038/s43856-024-00480-4ISI: 001196972300001PubMedID: 38565620OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-345934DiVA, id: diva2:1854694
Note

QC 20240426

Available from: 2024-04-26 Created: 2024-04-26 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved

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Fredolini, ClaudiaDodig-Crnkovic, TeaBendes, AnnikaDahl, LeoDale, MatildaMattsson, CeciliaThomas, Cecilia EngelRoxhed, NiclasSchwenk, Jochen M.

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Fredolini, ClaudiaDodig-Crnkovic, TeaBendes, AnnikaDahl, LeoDale, MatildaAlbrecht, VincentMattsson, CeciliaThomas, Cecilia EngelRoxhed, NiclasSchwenk, Jochen M.
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Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLabAffinity ProteomicsKTHMicro and Nanosystems
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