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An electrified road future.: A feasibility study of electric road systems (ERS) for the logistic sector in Sweden.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
2014 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Electrification of transportation could be one pathway into sustainability since the

electricity production can originate from renewable and low carbon energy sources.

Electrifying the road could also reduce the battery dependence and further increase the

vehicle efficiency in sense of energy consumption and load capacity when thinking of

storage of electric energy in vehicle batteries. Not only is the Electric Road System

(ERS) a rather new concept, it also raises concerns about consequences on health,

safety, environment and public acceptance.

The aim of this master thesis, within the logistics domain, is to interdisciplinary investigate the

concept of electrified roads and to define potential blockers and in various extents investigate

their feasibility. The potential blockers are assessed at a system level meaning that the depth of

analysis of each aspect depends on the amount of data available and the relative importance

according to the experts. Given the limits of research time, points that require more investigation

have been indicated. This study will have a focus on freight vehicles since that is the vehicle

considered to lack alternative solution towards decarbonization.

The areas chosen for a closer analysis are health, safety and environment. The information

available regarding the ERS impact on those areas is very limited even though they seem to

constitute crucial factors for gaining the public acceptance. By investigating energy usage and

CO

2 emissions in different phases of the ERS, the feasibility of the environment is assessed.

Investigating the Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) produced by the inductive on-road charging

technology, part of the ERS, approaches the possible health effects of ERS. Health effects of

particles and pollutants are also touched upon. Accidents involving Electric Vehicles (EVs) and

the transportation of dangerous goods through ERS will also be analyzed in the safety chapter.

Ongoing projects and available technologies are used and taken into consideration throughout

the study. Feedback from the industry and people involved with the ERS concept contribute in

defining the fields facing significant uncertainties. In the last part, two scenarios are being

analyzed in the sense of testing the feasibility of the inductive on-road charging in city logistics

and for the big city triangle.

This study has its base in literature reviews and interviews with experts within the industry. The

different ERS technologies are still under development why many specific parameters are

confidential. This poses some unintentional limits to this study in the sense of difficulty drawing

specific conclusions. Therefore factors such as commercialization of the vehicle, health, safety

and development time remain uncertain. Others such as environmental impact seem to benefit

from the ERS, while others motivates the introduction of ERS such as the battery

manufacturing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. , p. 172
Series
TSC-MT ; 14-008
Keywords [en]
Feasibility, electric roads, ERS, freight vehicles, inductive, conductive, health, electric vehicle.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-149530OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-149530DiVA, id: diva2:739888
Available from: 2014-08-22 Created: 2014-08-22

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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