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Cedrol, a malaria mosquito oviposition attractant is produced by fungi isolated from rhizomes of the grass Cyperus rotundus
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2150-4075
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2016 (English)In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 15, 478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cedrol, a sesquiterpene alcohol, is the first identified oviposition attractant for African malaria vectors. Finding the natural source of this compound might help to elucidate why Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis prefer to lay eggs in habitats containing it. Previous studies suggest that cedrol may be a fungal metabolite and the essential oil of grass rhizomes have been described to contain a high amount of different sesquiterpenes. Results: Rhizomes of the grass Cyperus rotundus were collected in a natural malaria mosquito breeding site. Two fungi were isolated from an aqueous infusion with these rhizomes. They were identified as Fusarium falciforme and a species in the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex. Volatile compounds were collected from the headspace above fungal cultures on Tenax traps which were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). Cedrol and a cedrol isomer were detected in the headspace above the F. fujikuroi culture, while only cedrol was detected above the F. falciforme culture. Conclusion: Cedrol an oviposition attractant for African malaria vectors is produced by two fungi species isolated from grass rhizomes collected from a natural mosquito breeding site.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016. Vol. 15, 478
Keyword [en]
Malaria, Oviposition attractant, Fungi, Rhizome, Cedrol
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-193989DOI: 10.1186/s12936-016-1536-7ISI: 000383665600004PubMedID: 27639972Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84988312220OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-193989DiVA: diva2:1037672
Funder
Swedish Research Council, SWE-2010-129
Note

QC 20161017

Available from: 2016-10-17 Created: 2016-10-14 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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