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Challenges in architecting fully automated driving; With an emphasis on heavy commercial vehicles
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9314-545X
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4300-885X
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1768-6697
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings - 2016 Workshop on Automotive Systems/Software Architectures, WASA 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, 2-9 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Fully automated vehicles will require new functionalities for perception, navigation and decision making - an Autonomous Driving Intelligence (ADI). We consider architectural cases for such functionalities and investigate how they integrate with legacy platforms. The cases range from a robot replacing the driver - with entire reuse of existing vehicle platforms, to a clean-slate design. Focusing on Heavy Commercial Vehicles (HCVs), we assess these cases from the perspectives of business, safety, dependability, verification, and realization. The original contributions of this paper are the classification of the architectural cases themselves and the analysis that follows. The analysis reveals that although full reuse of vehicle platforms is appealing, it will require explicitly dealing with the accidental complexity of the legacy platforms, including adding corresponding diagnostics and error handling to the ADI. The current fail-safe design of the platform will also tend to limit availability. Allowing changes to the platforms, will enable more optimized designs and fault-operational behaviour, but will require initial higher development cost and specific emphasis on partitioning and control to limit the influences of safety requirements. For all cases, the design and verification of the ADI will pose a grand challenge and relate to the evolution of the regulatory framework including safety standards.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016. 2-9 p.
Keyword [en]
architecture, automotive, autonomy, commercial vehicles, dependability, full automation, functional safety, heavy vehicles, HGV, ISO 26262, modularity, platform migration, SAE L5, variability, verification
National Category
Embedded Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-194545DOI: 10.1109/WASA.2016.10ISI: 000386759300002ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84978198875ISBN: 978-150902571-8 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-194545DiVA: diva2:1043664
Conference
Workshop on Automotive Systems/Software Architectures, WASA 2016, Venice, Italy, 5 April 2016 through
Note

QC 20161031

Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2016-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Mohan, NaveenTörngren, MartinIzosimov, ViacheslavGustavsson, JoakimNesic, Damir
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