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Bogies towards higher speed on existing tracks
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8237-5847
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles.
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Rail transportation, ISSN 2324-8378, E-ISSN 2324-8386, Vol. 2, no 1, 40-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Running faster on existing tracks is a common operator’s wish that should be set in relation to the necessary infrastructure maintenance costs for track quality enhancement. Designing a track-friendly running gear that exerts moderate forces on the track is a key to relax this relation. A design providing good ride quality even on non-perfect track is preferred to avoid excessive track maintenance costs when speeds are higher. This paper describes how simulations and tests have been performed to optimise certain parts of a high-speed bogie. The result is a bogie with relatively soft wheelset guidance allowing passive radial self-steering in common curve radii, which in combination with appropriate yaw damping ensures stability at higher speeds. It also includes active secondary suspension to further ease the maintenance requirements on the track and/or to improve ride quality. This bogie has been tested and approved according to EN 14363 for a service speed of 250 km/h in combination with enhanced curving speed. Both simulations and recently performed on-track tests further showed that the ride comfort with active secondary suspension at 250 km/h can be at least as good as with passive suspensions at 200 km/h.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014. Vol. 2, no 1, 40-49 p.
Keyword [en]
active suspension, high-speed train, on-track tests, simulation, track friendliness, wheel wear
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-194769DOI: 10.1080/23248378.2013.878294Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84977621031OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-194769DiVA: diva2:1046115
Note

QC 20161111

Available from: 2016-11-11 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2016-11-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf