Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Optimizing the Natural Gas Engine for CO2 reduction
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9483-7992
2016 (English)In: SAE Technical Papers, SAE International , 2016, Vol. 2016-April, no AprilConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With alternative fuels having moved more into market in light of their reduction of emissions of CO2 and other air pollutants, the spark ignited internal combustion engine design has only been affected to small extent. The development of combustion engines running on natural gas or Biogas have been focused to maintain driveability on gasoline, creating a multi fuel platform which does not fully utilise the alternative fuels' potential. However, optimising these concepts on a fundamental level for gas operation shows a great potential to increase the level of utilisation and effectiveness of the engine and thereby meeting the emissions legislation. The project described in this paper has focused on optimising a combustion concept for CNG combustion on a single cylinder research engine. The ICE's efficiency at full load and the fuels characteristics, including its knock resistance, is of primary interest - together with part load performance and overall fuel consumption. In the process of increasing the efficiency of the engine the following areas have been of primary interest, increased compression ratio, thermal load at high cylinder pressure and the use of EGR to further increase efficiency. The overall goal in the project was to reduce the CO2-emissions while maintaining the performance and characteristics of the engine. The ambition is to reduce specific tail-pipe CO2-emissions in g/kWh by 50% compared to a modern gasoline engine. The goal was close to being reached at 45% reduction at full load and 25-34% on part load. This was done by theoretically downsizing the engine and increasing the specific performance of the engine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAE International , 2016. Vol. 2016-April, no April
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-195061DOI: 10.4271/2016-01-0875Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84975263292OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-195061DiVA: diva2:1049177
Conference
SAE 2016 World Congress and Exhibition, Detroit, United States, 12 April 2016 through 14 April 2016
Note

QC 20161123

Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-01 Last updated: 2017-04-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Cronhjort, Andreas
By organisation
Internal Combustion Engines
Mechanical Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 203 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf