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Dynamics in Swedish Industry and Political History
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
2016 (English)In: A Dynamic Mind: Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius / [ed] Pär Blomkvist, Petter Johansson, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2016, 1, 321-367 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Rules and regulations for industry are of great importance for the wellbeing of a country. In this chapter I discuss the complex inter-play between governmental actions and industrial development in Sweden during one and a half century. I divide the period into three phases.

The first phase was initiated in the mid-1800s when a number of decisions speeded up the process of industrialization in Sweden – giving Sweden many new ventures founded by entrepreneurs. The second phase was initiated by the depression after World War I. The ownership of Swedish industry was concentrated to a few financial spheres, which closely cooperated with the Social Democratic government and the reformist labor movement. The third phase was initiated by the crises in the mid-1970s. The Social Democrats lost the election in 1976 and a new political era was born. In the late 1980s it was also followed by a new globalization era in industry.

Globalization has fundamentally changed possibilities for small nations, like Sweden, to form national strategies for growth. But still the “Swedish model” from last century evokes a nostalgic response from many Swedes. Also, some concepts and institutions, as well as rules and regulations, still survive with some strength, even though they originated in a different era and are less relevant today. I hope that the reader of this chapter shall be aware that yesterday’s successful principles of setting rules for industry, as well as organizing and managing different businesses might no longer be appropriate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2016, 1. 321-367 p.
Series
TRITA-IEO, ISSN 1100-7982 ; 2016:08
Keyword [en]
Business Logics, Globalization, Industrialization, Industrial Development
National Category
Economic History Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Work Sciences
Research subject
Industrial Engineering and Management
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-198469ISBN: 978-91-7729-170-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-198469DiVA: diva2:1056568
Note

QC 20161215

Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2016-12-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf