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Sweden
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1523-2587
2017 (English)In: Sustainable Communities and Urban Housing: A comparative European perspective / [ed] Pareja-Eastaway, Montserrat; Winston, Nessa, Abingdon, Oxon;New York, NY: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 55-73Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sweden has a high sustainability index according to international comparisons. The Swedish policies regarding sustainability in housing focus energy consumption. These policies are relatively effective and broadly accepted, like f. ex. a number of targeted subsidies which have enhanced property owners’ investment in energy saving technology (heat-pumps, district heating….). The urban environment is generally healthy, as a result of regulations of urban planning. Housing quality is high, although differences are increasing.

This growing gap of housing quality is driven by rising prices and affordability issues. Higher income households often ‘over-consume’ dwelling space, as transaction costs are high due to the rise of house prices plus taxes on the revenue from realisation of the current house value. The main part of new housing production is aiming at the upper end of the market for ownership tenure. Young, low income households have a steep entry to the housing market, as vacant affordable rental units are few. The distribution of dwelling space is uneven, as is security of tenure and housing costs.

The pending challenge is an overheated housing market, where house prices are steadily rising. After deregulation of the former more controlled housing market, housing production has been slow to increase. Swedish households are on average indebted up to a level of 175 % of their net income (among the more debt laden European, source Riksbanken – The National Swedish Bank). This is a threatening home-made crisis. Swedish housing offers many high quality buildings and infrastructure designed to defer/postpone the climate change, but the immediate social demand of a higher supply of affordable dwellings is yet to be solved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon;New York, NY: Routledge, 2017, 1. p. 55-73
Series
Routledge Studies in International Real Estate ; 4
Keyword [en]
Economic sustainability, social sustainability, environmental sustainability, Housing
National Category
Civil Engineering
Research subject
Real Estate and Construction Management
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-206224ISBN: 978-1-138-91148-2 (print)ISBN: 978-1-315-69263-0 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-206224DiVA, id: diva2:1092008
Note

QC 20170503

Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2017-06-15Bibliographically approved

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https://www.routledge.com/Sustainable-Communities-and-Urban-Housing-A-Comparative-European-Perspective/Pareja-Eastaway-Winston/p/book/9781138911482

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Output format
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