Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Performance Measurement Systems: Art and Science: A Perspective from Complexity Theory
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
Universitat Rovira I Virgili, Spain.
Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
2016 (English)In: Performance Management Association (PMA) conference, Edinburgh, Scotland 26- 29 June 2016 / [ed] Umit S Bititci , Herriot - Watt University: Professor of Business Performance, 2016Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Complexity negatively impacts the process of continually improving Performance Management Systems (PMS). Extant literature in PMS considers complexity to be a result of complex external environments rather than user’s response to it. However, this paper argues that organisations face internal complexity while adopting a PMS. Miscalculations of this complexity increases uncountable costs to organisations. Henceforth, this study adopts a complexity-theory perspective, and explores how organisational controls amplify complexity at the three core process stages of a PMS i.e., design, implementation and use. The paper builds on a Systematic Literature Review, comprising 58 papers, which are analysed in depth using a framework typifying technical and social controls as suggested by Smith and Bititci (2017). Results demonstrate that social and technical controls impact PMS process stages and contribute to complexity of PMS in two ways: First, a lack of clear and concise administration between the balance of objectivity and subjectivity in PMS at each process stage results in social complexity. Second, a range of interacting elements make it difficult to manage PMS and their inter- relationships across the three process stages resulting in technical complexity. The findings reinforce that the interaction of organisational controls in the system is emergent, unintended, unpredictable, and ambiguous in what to measure and how to manage it. In conclusion, this study posits that users’ response to the external environment causes internal Performance Measurement Complexity (PMC). In doing so, this paper highlights the propagation of complexity in six forms i.e. Analytical, Methodological, Technological, Role, Procedural and Task Complexity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keyword [en]
Social controls, Technical control, Performance Measurement Complexity
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Management; Production Engineering; Industrial Information and Control Systems; Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-206831OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-206831DiVA: diva2:1094006
Conference
Performance Management Association (PMA) conference, Edinburgh, Scotland 26- 29 June 2016
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research Council
Note

This paper was invited for a special issue on PMM- Towards a Theoretical Foundation for Performance Measurement and Management.

QC 20170519

Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2017-05-29Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Collaborative Measures: Challenges in Airport Operations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative Measures: Challenges in Airport Operations
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Over the last 20 years, internal use of Performance Management(PM) within organizations has become much more complex in terms measurement techniques and approaches as well as their deployment within different organizational structures. In contrast to the traditional use of PM as an intra-organizational system, the emergence of networked operations, has extended organizational boundaries of Performance Management System (PMS) to new operational settings where actors often deal with a challenge of Collaborative Measures. Consequently, there is a significant lack of feedback and feedforward reporting mechanisms. This raises an important question for Performance Measurement & Management (PMM) literature. How do actors manage operations through inter- organizational performance measures? Hence, the purpose of this thesis is to investigate the management of collaborative measures in a quest to attain better operational performance for inter- organizational PM.

The thesis builds on four studies investigating a collaborative PMS for capacity enhancements in airport operations. Due to their operational complexity and highly networked subsystems, airport operations provided a fitting empirical scene for studying PM that transcends organizational boundaries. Within the context of this thesis, airports are viewed as a System of System (SoS), and inter- organizational PM is investigated with the dimensions Organizational Complexity, Continuous Improvement and Social system. The studies use a multimethod approach, including longitudinal action research, multiple-case study, Systematic Literature Review (SLR), Classification and Regression Tree method (CART) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) Method.

The findings show that that (1) inter- organizational performance is affected by intrinsic Performance Measurement Complexity (PMC) which aggregates as interactive complexity with many actors. (2) The challenge of feedback and feedforward mechanisms as a dual control for collaborative performance is analysed with four cybernetic functions: sensor, commander, actuator and process. (3) The concept of Reflective Performance Measurement System (RPMS) is introduced with general conditions to facilitate collaborative decision-making within such platforms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. 76 p.
Series
TRITA-IEO, ISSN 1100-7982 ; 7
Keyword
Performance Measurement, Airport Operations, Collaboration Decision Making
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Management; Planning and Decision Analysis; Transport Science; Industrial Information and Control Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207780 (URN)978-91-7729-331-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-14, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
MASCA- Managing System Change in Aviation
Note

This research was conducted within the framework of the European Doctorate in Industrial Management—EDIM, which is funded by the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) of the European Commission. QC 20170524

Available from: 2017-05-24 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2017-06-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Okwir, SimonAngelis, Jannis
By organisation
Industrial Management
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 93 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf