Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A subcellular map of the human proteome
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. (Emma Lundberg)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6107-1465
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. (Emma Lundberg)
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. (Emma Lundberg)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6368-6690
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. (Emma Lundberg)
Show others and affiliations
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Cell Biology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207011DOI: 10.1126/science.aal3321OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-207011DiVA: diva2:1095127
Note

QC 20170512

Available from: 2017-05-12 Created: 2017-05-12 Last updated: 2017-05-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Spatial proteome profiling of the compartments of the human cell using an antibody-based approach
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial proteome profiling of the compartments of the human cell using an antibody-based approach
2017 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The human cell is complex, with countless processes ongoing in parallel in specialized compartments, the organelles. Cells can be studied in vitro by using immortalized cell lines that represent cells in vivo to a varying degree. Gene expression varies between cell types and an average cell line expresses around 10,000-12,000 genes, as measured with RNA sequencing. These genes encode the cell’s proteome; the full set of proteins that perform functions in the cell. In paper I we show that RNA sequencing is a necessary tool for studying the proteome of the human cell.

By studying the proteome, and proteins’ localization in the cell, information can be assembled on how the cell functions. Image-based methods allow for detailed spatial resolution of protein localization as well as enable the study of temporal events. Visualization of a protein can be accomplished by using either a cell line that is transfected to express the protein with a fluorescent tag, or by targeting the protein with an affinity reagent such as an antibody. In paper II we present subcellular data for a majority of the human proteins, showing that there is a high degree of complexity in regard to where proteins localize in the cell.

Cellular energy is generated in the mitochondria, an important organelle that is also active in many other different functions. Today approximately only a third of the estimated mitochondrial proteome has been validated experimentally, indicating that there is much more to understand with regard to the functions of the mitochondria. In paper III we explore the mitochondrial proteome, based on the results of paper II. We also present a method for sublocalizing proteins to subcompartments that can be performed in a high-throughput manner.

To conclude, this thesis shows that transcriptomics is a useful tool for proteome-wide subcellular localization, and presents high-resolution spatial distribution data for the human cell with a deeper analysis of the mitochondrial proteome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. 49 p.
Series
TRITA-BIO-Report, ISSN 1654-2312 ; 2017:11
Keyword
Fluorescence imaging, Human proteome, Human Protein Atlas, Immunofluorescence, Mitochondria, Organelles, Spatial distribution
National Category
Cell Biology
Research subject
Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-206817 (URN)978-91-7729-393-4 (ISBN)
Presentation
2017-06-16, Gamma 2, Tomtebodavägen 23A, Solna, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20170512

Available from: 2017-05-12 Created: 2017-05-12 Last updated: 2017-06-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Thul, PeterÅkesson, LovisaWiking, MikaelaMahdessian, DianaLundberg, Emma Käller
By organisation
Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology
Cell Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 32 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf