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Data-driven analysis of nutrient inputs and transfer through nested catchments
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. Department of Physical Geography and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Applied Hydraulics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy, University of Split, Split, Croatia.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1225-3526
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
Department of Physical Geography and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden..
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A data-driven screening methodology is developed for estimating nutrient inputs, deliveries and retentions in catchments with measured water discharges and nutrient concentrations along the river network. The methodology is also specifically applied to the Sava River Catchment (SRC), a major transboundary catchment in the Southeast Europe. A characteristic regional value emerges for nutrient input per unit area of around 30 T/yr/km2 for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and 2 T/yr/km2 for total phosphorus (TP) in the relatively large nested catchments (>40 000 km2) of the SRC; fluctuating values are obtained for smaller nested catchments (of around 10 000 km2). The applied methodology also identifies hotspot catchments for nutrient input per unit area, in the range of 158 T/yr/km2 for DIN and 13 T/yr/km2 for TP, within the SRC. Furthermore, relative nutrient delivery is found to be scale-dependent, exhibiting power-law decay with increasing catchment area, with exponents of around 1.4-1.7 for both DIN and TP. At the largest catchment scale with available data within the SRC the relative delivery is around 0.08 for DIN and 0.03 for TP. Overall, the SRC nutrient data show similar nutrient relations to driving hydro-climatic conditions (runoff for nutrient loads) and socio-economic conditions (population density and farmland share for nutrient concentrations) as in the compared Baltic region.

Keyword [en]
Total nitrogen, Total phosphorus, Input, Delivery, Loads, Methodology, (Sub)catchments
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207097OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-207097DiVA: diva2:1095748
Projects
VR 2009-3221FORMAS 2014-43
Note

QC 20170522

Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2017-05-22Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Data-driven analysis of water and nutrient flows: Case of the Sava River Catchment and comparison with other regions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data-driven analysis of water and nutrient flows: Case of the Sava River Catchment and comparison with other regions
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A growing human population and demands for food, freshwater and energy are causing extensive changes in the water and biogeochemical cycles of river catchments around the world. Addressing and investigating such changes is particularly important for transboundary river catchments, where they impose additional risk to a region’s stability. This thesis investigates and develops data-driven methodologies for detecting hydro-climatic and nutrient load changes and their drivers with limited available data and on different catchment scales. As a specific case study, we analyze the Sava River Catchment (SRC) and compare its results with other world regions. A past–present to future evaluation of hydro-climatic data is done on the basis of a water balance approach including analysis of historic developments of land use and hydropower development data and projections of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5) output. Using observed water discharge and nutrient concentration data, we propose a novel conceptual model for estimating and spatially resolving total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) input and delivery-retention properties for a river catchment and its nested subcatchments, as well as detection of nutrient hotspots. The thesis identifies hydroclimatic change signals of hydropower-related drivers and finds consistency with other world regions. The proposed nutrient screening methodology provides a good distinction between human-related nutrient inputs and landscape-related transport influences on nutrient loading at subcatchment to catchment scale. A cross-regional comparison of the SRC data with the Baltic region shows similarity between nutrient-relevant indicators and driving socio-economic and hydro-climatic conditions. The study highlights a number of complexities with regard to CMIP5 model representation of water fluxes. The large intermodel range of CMIP5 future projections of fluxes calls for caution when using individual model results for assessing ongoing and future water and nutrient changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. 30 p.
Series
TRITA-LWR. PHD, ISSN 1650-8602 ; 2017:03
Keyword
River catchment, Transboundary, Hydro-climatic change, Total nitrogen, Total phosphorus, CMIP5
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207102 (URN)978-91-7729-415-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-08, Sal F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
VR 2009-3221FORMAS 2014-43
Note

QC 20170516

Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved

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