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Low-temperature heating in existing Swedish multi-family houses: An assessment of the significance of radiator design and geometry
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6266-8485
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5902-2886
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1882-3833
2017 (English)In: Science and Technology for the Built Environment, ISSN 2374-4731, E-ISSN 2374-474X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 500-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study evaluates the impacts of radiator designs and geometries. The aim was to map the thermal efficiency and performance differences of studied radiator types. A typical Swedish low-rise, multi-family house was selected to present the analysis. A Swedish climate was employed to evaluate the applicability. The on-site measurements, analytical model, and real-life performance data from radiator manufacturing were applied for the modeling work. Radiator Type 21 (1.2 x 0.4m) showed the highest exergy efficiency; Type 11 (1.2 x 0.45m), the lowest. There is no evidence that Type 22 (adding more convector plate) has a higher thermal efficiency than Type 21, from an engineering perspective, within the climate range of -20 degrees C to 15 degrees C. Baseboard radiators showed a 34% higher exergy performance than the most efficient conventional radiator, with the same surface area, at mean outdoor temperatures during an average heating season in Sweden (-1.3 degrees C). The results also suggest that Type 21 would have higher efficiency than Type 11 during 50% time of the heating season, in severe climate conditions. In the climate of Stockholm, this efficiency advantage was 20%. For the mild climate, Type 11 and Type 21 performed almost the same over the entire heating season.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC , 2017. Vol. 23, no 3, p. 500-511
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207727DOI: 10.1080/23744731.2017.1292741ISI: 000399688200012Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85015662204OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-207727DiVA, id: diva2:1098450
Note

QC 20170524

Available from: 2017-05-24 Created: 2017-05-24 Last updated: 2017-06-30Bibliographically approved

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Wang, QianPloskic, AdnanHolmberg, Sture

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