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Mainstream Deammonification: Preliminary Experience Employing Granular AOB-Enriched Biomass at Low DO Values
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
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2017 (English)In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 228, no 5, 178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The deammonification process represents one of the most convenient pathways for nitrogen removal from wastewater. A great deal of scientific articles dwells on the treatment of sidestream fluxes, whereas applications to mainstream waters represent a novel field. Among the general challenges of deammonification, one of the most important is the effective selection of ammonia oxidizers (AOB) over nitrite oxidizers (NOB), but also the typical slow start-up periods. In addition to such issues, mainstream deammonification has to face water temperatures and alkalinity reserves lower than those of sidestream fluxes and higher content of organic matter. An attempt was made to tackle such challenges by employing a lab-scale plant; low dissolved oxygen (DO) values (average 0.78 mg/L) and granular AOB-enriched biomass were used in order to address exclusion of nitrite oxidizers. The granules also allowed better biomass retention. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was established initially at 24 h and later decreased to 12 h, as to possibly enhance the performance of the reactor. After 52 days of operation, Anammox biomass was also inoculated to the reactor. The results showed a maximum nitrogen removal efficiency of 54%. Moreover, little quantities of nitrates were observed throughout the experiment (<5 mg N/L twice, under the limit of quantification the rest of the sampling days), meaning that NOB out-selection techniques worked properly. Retention of biomass was also positively addressed and yielded a final SRT value of 15.6 days. Therefore, the proposed solution for mainstream deammonification was demonstrated to be promising and more research would be necessary to optimize it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing , 2017. Vol. 228, no 5, 178
Keyword [en]
Anammox, DO control, Granular biomass, Mainstream deammonification, Partial nitrification
National Category
Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-207346DOI: 10.1007/s11270-017-3253-4ISI: 000401070100001ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85017525788OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-207346DiVA: diva2:1106328
Note

QC 20170607

Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-06-07Bibliographically approved

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